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Naked Liturgist

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  • Bosco Peters
    Greetings My first attempt at a vlog - a video online; If you get frustrated with the liturgy of the notices like I & my teenage children do have a look at
    Message 1 of 17 , Apr 22, 2008
      Greetings

      My first attempt at a vlog - a video online;
      If you get frustrated with the liturgy of the notices
      like I & my teenage children do
      have a look at "the Naked Liturgist"
      stripping back worship to the bare essentials

      http://www.liturgy.co.nz/naked/liturgist.html

      It's weird sitting in a room alone speaking towards a dot on my laptop.
      I guess I'll get better at it as I continue this series :-)

      Christ is Risen!

      Bosco
      www.liturgy.co.nz
    • DJP4LAW@aol.com
      Bosco, what s weird for this Upper Midwest (home of standard USAmerican speech) USAmerican Lutheran is hearing fair pronounced fear ! I joke -- but only
      Message 2 of 17 , Apr 23, 2008
        Bosco, what's weird for this Upper Midwest (home of standard USAmerican speech) USAmerican Lutheran is hearing "fair" pronounced "fear"! I joke -- but only because you made me laugh out loud at work! I'm forwarding the link to our pastor/pastor-in-training (whom we call the "Vicar")/Worship Committee Chair/and church administrator (who does the bulletins).

        This is by way of self-congratulation, because at Mount Olive Minneapolis, we would probably refuse to announce a fire, if one flared up. (We violate our policy only to announce prayer intentions that arose too late to make it into the bulletin/worship-folder/whatever.)

        Nicely done.





        Peace
        Dwight Penas
        Minneapolis
        ____________________________
        We are an Easter people, and alleluia is our song. -- Augustine of Hippo






        -----Original Message-----
        From: Bosco Peters <bpeters@...>
        To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, 22 Apr 2008 5:42 pm
        Subject: [liturgy-l] Naked Liturgist

























        Greetings



        My first attempt at a vlog - a video online;

        If you get frustrated with the liturgy of the notices

        like I & my teenage children do

        have a look at "the Naked Liturgist"

        stripping back worship to the bare essentials



        http://www.liturgy.co.nz/naked/liturgist.html



        It's weird sitting in a room alone speaking towards a dot on my laptop.

        I guess I'll get better at it as I continue this series :-)



        Christ is Risen!



        Bosco

        www.liturgy.co.nz






















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Chris McConnell
        ... I m not a USAmerican (nice YouTube pageant bimbo reference!), but I ve lived in Minnesota, and there s nothing standard about that accent! :) I thought
        Message 3 of 17 , Apr 23, 2008
          --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, DJP4LAW@... wrote:

          > Upper Midwest (home of standard USAmerican speech)

          I'm not a USAmerican (nice YouTube pageant bimbo reference!), but I've
          lived in Minnesota, and there's nothing "standard" about that accent! :)

          I thought the perceived "standard," for national newscasters, etc.,
          was supposed to be an Ohio accent. Then again, I've also heard that
          Northern California is often perceived by "USAmericans" as "not having
          an accent." Who knows?

          Chris <--- after a year and half back home, only now starting to
          recover his own accent, eh?
        • Scott Knitter
          I think the midwestern accent was broadcast-standard in the USA until The Great Vowel Shift that gave us gems like FEE-at for fat (my favorite rendering is
          Message 4 of 17 , Apr 23, 2008
            I think the midwestern accent was broadcast-standard in the USA until
            The Great Vowel Shift that gave us gems like "FEE-at" for "fat" (my
            favorite rendering is that for "Fantastic Sam's" (a haircut place):
            fee-un tee-us tee-ick see-ums). Flattened vowels in general (a good
            test phrase for a Chicago accent is "Take the Red Line to Addison" --
            that's how you get to Wrigley Field, but it also tests for the flat
            long a, duh for the, the sharp and flat long i, and the
            polysyllablically flat short a.

            I'd agree about Northern California being pretty much Standard
            American except sometimes for an extreme case of the short o being
            lengthened: PAWL-itics.

            Scott, who thought he had no accent until he read a lesson at a daily
            Mass at St Michael's, NYC, and asked for feedback from an East Coast
            friend. Twang, he said. Twang? TWANG?

            On 4/23/08, Chris McConnell <cdmcconnell@...> wrote:
            > --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, DJP4LAW@... wrote:
            >
            > > Upper Midwest (home of standard USAmerican speech)
            >
            > I'm not a USAmerican (nice YouTube pageant bimbo reference!), but I've
            > lived in Minnesota, and there's nothing "standard" about that accent! :)
            >
            > I thought the perceived "standard," for national newscasters, etc.,
            > was supposed to be an Ohio accent. Then again, I've also heard that
            > Northern California is often perceived by "USAmericans" as "not having
            > an accent." Who knows?
            >
            > Chris <--- after a year and half back home, only now starting to
            > recover his own accent, eh?
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To write to the owners/moderators, please send an email to:
            > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.comYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >


            --
            Scott R. Knitter
            Edgewater, Chicago, Illinois USA
          • Chris McConnell
            ... For this Canadian, that was exactly the most distinctive thing about it in Minnesota. I saw a documentary on the history of Canadian English a while back,
            Message 5 of 17 , Apr 23, 2008
              --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, "Scott Knitter" <scottknitter@...>
              wrote:

              > I think the midwestern accent was broadcast-standard in the USA until
              > The Great Vowel Shift that gave us gems like "FEE-at" for "fat"

              For this Canadian, that was exactly the most distinctive thing about
              it in Minnesota. I saw a documentary on the history of Canadian
              English a while back, and they mentioned that "Northern Cities Vowel
              Shift," called such because it stretches from Minnesota through
              Chicago, and all the way to Buffalo and Rochester. Apparently it's an
              interesting phenomenon, because while it's so widespread, it decidedly
              stops right at the border. You can hear it in Niagara Falls, NY, but
              not in Niagara Falls, ON (except, of course, among tourists). It
              demonstrates that accents are not just a result of geographic
              location, but identity. Even though I live fairly close to native
              users of that accent, and hear Buffalo newscasters use it all the
              time, no one I know would use it, because it just sounds foreign to us.

              Chris
            • Douglas Cowling
              ... I grew in St. Catharines, 20 miles from Niagara Falls and the American border. Buffalo was in a completely different linguistic zone. We used to laugh at
              Message 6 of 17 , Apr 23, 2008
                On 4/23/08 10:20 PM, "Chris McConnell" <cdmcconnell@...> wrote:

                > Even though I live fairly close to native
                > users of that accent, and hear Buffalo newscasters use it all the
                > time, no one I know would use it, because it just sounds foreign to us.

                I grew in St. Catharines, 20 miles from Niagara Falls and the American
                border. Buffalo was in a completely different linguistic zone. We used to
                laugh at the way the news commentators on WKBW-Buffalo pronounced the
                suburban towns of Cheektowaga, Lackawana and Tonawanda.

                Doug Cowling
                Director of Music
                St. Philip's Church, Toronto
              • R Drake
                Chris, I was amused by your comments from the other side of the border. I grew up in Rochester, and as a singer, counted myself lucky to have been brought up
                Message 7 of 17 , Apr 23, 2008
                  Chris, I was amused by your comments from the other side of the border. I grew up in Rochester, and as a singer, counted myself lucky to have been brought up linguistically by parents from out of the area and a radio which was normally tuned to CBL Toronto rather than to a local station. The result, of course, was that for years people tended to mistake me for Canadian but couldn't tell quite where! It wasn't until years later that I saw the research on the Northern vowel shift and realized that was what I had heard in the area.

                  Robin Drake
                  (now living in Herndon, VA)

                  ----- Original Message ----
                  From: Chris McConnell <cdmcconnell@...>
                  To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2008 10:20:50 PM
                  Subject: [liturgy-l] accents, was Re: Naked Liturgist

                  --- In liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com, "Scott Knitter" <scottknitter@...>
                  wrote:

                  > I think the midwestern accent was broadcast-standard in the USA until
                  > The Great Vowel Shift that gave us gems like "FEE-at" for "fat"

                  For this Canadian, that was exactly the most distinctive thing about
                  it in Minnesota. I saw a documentary on the history of Canadian
                  English a while back, and they mentioned that "Northern Cities Vowel
                  Shift," called such because it stretches from Minnesota through
                  Chicago, and all the way to Buffalo and Rochester. Apparently it's an
                  interesting phenomenon, because while it's so widespread, it decidedly
                  stops right at the border. You can hear it in Niagara Falls, NY, but
                  not in Niagara Falls, ON (except, of course, among tourists). It
                  demonstrates that accents are not just a result of geographic
                  location, but identity. Even though I live fairly close to native
                  users of that accent, and hear Buffalo newscasters use it all the
                  time, no one I know would use it, because it just sounds foreign to us.

                  Chris


                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
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                  know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
                • John Botari
                  ... I grew up a few miles away from Doug (in Welland), and one of my musician friends told a story about being lost in Buffalo with his band, on the way to a
                  Message 8 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                    Doug Cowling wrote (in part):

                    > I grew up in St. Catharines, 20 miles from Niagara Falls and the American
                    > border. Buffalo was in a completely different linguistic zone. We used to
                    > laugh at the way the news commentators on WKBW-Buffalo pronounced the
                    > suburban towns of Cheektowaga, Lackawana and Tonawanda.

                    I grew up a few miles away from Doug (in Welland), and one of my
                    musician friends told a story about being lost in Buffalo with his
                    band, on the way to a gig. They pulled over to the side of the
                    road and walked into a variety store, in hopes of finding a Buffalo
                    city map.

                    The clerk asked if they needed any help, and my friend said,

                    "Have you got a map?"

                    The clerk looked puzzled, and repeated, "... a map?"

                    My friend said, "Ya, we're lost, and we were wondering if you
                    had a city map."

                    Enlightenment flashed across the clerk's face as she realized
                    what they were talking about. "Oh, a mee-ap! Geez, I thought
                    you were looking for a map, like, to map the floor!"

                    John Botari
                    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
                  • Frank Senn
                    I grew up in Buffalo listening to WKBW (until I discovered as a teen ager the classical music station in Toronto). I ve spent a lifetime trying to rid myself
                    Message 9 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                      I grew up in Buffalo listening to WKBW (until I discovered as a teen ager the classical music station in Toronto). I've spent a lifetime trying to rid myself of the Buffalo/Western NY accent. It grates on my ears when I hear it from my siblings, especially the nasal a and u that both sound like ah, as in Bahfahlo.

                      Frank from Buffalo

                      Douglas Cowling <cowling.douglas@...> wrote: On 4/23/08 10:20 PM, "Chris McConnell" <cdmcconnell@...> wrote:

                      > Even though I live fairly close to native
                      > users of that accent, and hear Buffalo newscasters use it all the
                      > time, no one I know would use it, because it just sounds foreign to us.

                      I grew in St. Catharines, 20 miles from Niagara Falls and the American
                      border. Buffalo was in a completely different linguistic zone. We used to
                      laugh at the way the news commentators on WKBW-Buffalo pronounced the
                      suburban towns of Cheektowaga, Lackawana and Tonawanda.

                      Doug Cowling
                      Director of Music
                      St. Philip's Church, Toronto






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • dlewisaao@aol.com
                      Reminds me of a time 15 years ago when I was in Cambridge, England hailing a cab. I got in, asked to be taken to the train station, and the cabbie said what
                      Message 10 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                        Reminds me of a time 15 years ago when I was in Cambridge, England hailing a
                        cab. I got in, asked to be taken to the train station, and the cabbie said
                        what I thought was "are you a priest?" (I had been picked up in front of
                        Jesus College.) I gave a puzzled response and found that he was really trying
                        to say, "are you impressed?"

                        David Lewis


                        In a message dated 4/24/2008 11:13:45 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                        jb@... writes:

                        I grew up a few miles away from Doug (in Welland), and one of my
                        musician friends told a story about being lost in Buffalo with his
                        band, on the way to a gig. They pulled over to the side of the
                        road and walked into a variety store, in hopes of finding a Buffalo
                        city map.

                        The clerk asked if they needed any help, and my friend said,

                        "Have you got a map?"

                        The clerk looked puzzled, and repeated, "... a map?"

                        My friend said, "Ya, we're lost, and we were wondering if you
                        had a city map."

                        Enlightenment flashed across the clerk's face as she realized
                        what they were talking about. "Oh, a mee-ap! Geez, I thought
                        you were looking for a map, like, to map the floor!"





                        **************Need a new ride? Check out the largest site for U.S. used car
                        listings at AOL Autos.
                        (http://autos.aol.com/used?NCID=aolcmp00300000002851)


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • asteresplanetai
                        +++ moved to Boulder, Colorado a few years ago and a couple weeks later found myself walking around, going Calarada, Calarada, Calarada until it suddenly
                        Message 11 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                          +++

                          moved to Boulder, Colorado a few years ago and a couple weeks later
                          found myself walking around, going "Calarada, Calarada, Calarada"
                          until it suddenly dawned on me what i was saying. "Calarada!" I
                          thought-- "Who says *that*??"

                          Then i realized: Everybody.

                          Just in case you were wondering, it's Call-oh-rad-oh. And not ...rahd-
                          oh, but ...*rad*-oh!

                          regards and have a blessed Pascha,

                          John burnett.
                        • Michael
                          Brings back memories of a couple from Queens looking for “terlot paper.” Our Texas ladies were a bit confused. Shalom b Yeshua haMoshiach, +Mar Michael
                          Message 12 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                            Brings back memories of a couple from Queens looking for �terlot paper.�
                            Our Texas ladies were a bit confused.



                            Shalom b'Yeshua haMoshiach,



                            +Mar Michael Abportus

                            Bishop of La Porte

                            Pastor: Congregation Benim Avraham

                            mjthannisch@...

                            HYPERLINK
                            "http://www.freewebs.com/childrenofabraham/"http://www.freewebs.com/children
                            ofabraham/

                            http://stores.lulu.com/store.php?fAcctID=1929216

                            281-867-9081



                            _____

                            From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                            Of John Botari
                            Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2008 9:28 AM
                            To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                            Cc: John Botari
                            Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] accents, was Re: Naked Liturgist



                            Doug Cowling wrote (in part):

                            > I grew up in St. Catharines, 20 miles from Niagara Falls and the American
                            > border. Buffalo was in a completely different linguistic zone. We used to
                            > laugh at the way the news commentators on WKBW-Buffalo pronounced the
                            > suburban towns of Cheektowaga, Lackawana and Tonawanda.

                            I grew up a few miles away from Doug (in Welland), and one of my
                            musician friends told a story about being lost in Buffalo with his
                            band, on the way to a gig. They pulled over to the side of the
                            road and walked into a variety store, in hopes of finding a Buffalo
                            city map.

                            The clerk asked if they needed any help, and my friend said,

                            "Have you got a map?"

                            The clerk looked puzzled, and repeated, "... a map?"

                            My friend said, "Ya, we're lost, and we were wondering if you
                            had a city map."

                            Enlightenment flashed across the clerk's face as she realized
                            what they were talking about. "Oh, a mee-ap! Geez, I thought
                            you were looking for a map, like, to map the floor!"

                            John Botari
                            Saskatoon, Saskatchewan




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                          • cantor03@aol.com
                            In a message dated 4/24/2008 11:35:50 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, fcsenn@sbcglobal.net writes: It grates on my ears when I hear it from my siblings,
                            Message 13 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                              In a message dated 4/24/2008 11:35:50 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                              fcsenn@... writes:

                              It grates on my ears when I hear it from my siblings, especially the nasal a
                              and u that both sound like ah, as in Bahfahlo. >>>>>

                              The Eastern USA is chock full of so many regional accents
                              that it is sometimes bewildering.

                              The VA Medical Center where I work serves a tri-state
                              region, and as a result I hear a multiplicity of accents.

                              The local anthracite region of NE Pennsylvania has its
                              own distinctive "coal-cracker" accent with a confusion
                              of "t" and "d" sounds and nasal "a" probably descending
                              from Eastern European immigrants.

                              There is a section of the "Southern Tier" of New York
                              State from Elmira and Binghamton south and the
                              adjoining "Northern Tier" of Pennsylvania where the
                              accents mimic the "Country Western" singers' speech.

                              Then there are the numerous and very distinctive New Jersey
                              accents from natives transplanted to the eastern edge of
                              Pennsylvania from the New York Metropolitan area.

                              It's an aural bouquet!

                              David Strang
                              From the Greater Twin Cities Area which
                              prides itself on "not having an accent,"
                              but which accent was nonetheless humorously
                              over-characterized in the movie, "Fargo."











                              **************Need a new ride? Check out the largest site for U.S. used car
                              listings at AOL Autos.
                              (http://autos.aol.com/used?NCID=aolcmp00300000002851)


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Michael
                              I was amazed the first time I visited New Orleans to find a Brooklyn accent. Turns out the people in that part of New Orleans came from the same area of
                              Message 14 of 17 , Apr 24, 2008
                                I was amazed the first time I visited New Orleans to find a Brooklyn accent.
                                Turns out the people in that part of New Orleans came from the same area of
                                Ireland as Brooklanites did.



                                Shalom b'Yeshua haMoshiach,



                                +Michael Joe Thannnisch

                                mjthannisch@...

                                HYPERLINK
                                "http://www.freewebs.com/childrenofabraham/"http://www.freewebs.com/children
                                ofabraham/

                                http://stores.lulu.com/store.php?fAcctID=1929216

                                281-867-9081



                                _____

                                From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                                Of cantor03@...
                                Sent: Thursday, April 24, 2008 6:21 PM
                                To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] accents, was Re: Naked Liturgist



                                In a message dated 4/24/2008 11:35:50 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
                                HYPERLINK "mailto:fcsenn%40sbcglobal.net"fcsenn@sbcglobal.-net writes:

                                It grates on my ears when I hear it from my siblings, especially the nasal a

                                and u that both sound like ah, as in Bahfahlo. >>>>>

                                The Eastern USA is chock full of so many regional accents
                                that it is sometimes bewildering.

                                The VA Medical Center where I work serves a tri-state
                                region, and as a result I hear a multiplicity of accents.

                                The local anthracite region of NE Pennsylvania has its
                                own distinctive "coal-cracker" accent with a confusion
                                of "t" and "d" sounds and nasal "a" probably descending
                                from Eastern European immigrants.

                                There is a section of the "Southern Tier" of New York
                                State from Elmira and Binghamton south and the
                                adjoining "Northern Tier" of Pennsylvania where the
                                accents mimic the "Country Western" singers' speech.

                                Then there are the numerous and very distinctive New Jersey
                                accents from natives transplanted to the eastern edge of
                                Pennsylvania from the New York Metropolitan area.

                                It's an aural bouquet!

                                David Strang
                                From the Greater Twin Cities Area which
                                prides itself on "not having an accent,"
                                but which accent was nonetheless humorously
                                over-characterized in the movie, "Fargo."



                                ************-**Need a new ride? Check out the largest site for U.S. used car

                                listings at AOL Autos.
                                (HYPERLINK
                                "http://autos.aol.com/used?NCID=aolcmp00300000002851"http://autos.-aol.com/u
                                sed?-NCID=aolcmp00300-000002851)

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                              • PETER ROBINSON
                                I retain my local accent from Barton-on-Humber in Lincolnshire, and some of the speech patterns that go with it - though it was somewhat modified by living in
                                Message 15 of 17 , Apr 25, 2008
                                  I retain my local accent from Barton-on-Humber in Lincolnshire, and some of the speech patterns that go with it - though it was somewhat modified by living in Yorkshire for several years. This occasionally causes a little confusion especiallu as there is a tendancy in that part of the world to omit "the" from a sentence. Hence my conversation with a new member of my parish

                                  Where are you from Father?

                                  Me: I'm from North of England

                                  So you are a Scot?

                                  Me: No - I grew up 30 mile from York. (then it dawns on me that I've done it again)

                                  Another linguistic quirk that sticks to me like glue - especially hen I am tired or not thinking about what I am saying - is the retention of thee and thou in the form of the word "tha" as in "what's tha doing; where's tha been; when tha's finished." Another one is as I walk out the house to go to work I'll usually say "I'll si thee, later."


                                  The Rev. Peter D. Robinson, F.S.S.M.
                                  Rector: St Paul's Anglican Church (UECNA), Prescott, AZ
                                  http://www.prescott-anglican.org



                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Michael
                                  Aye, that’s the way it is. I’ve just spent much of the evening with two Jordies (from Newcastle for those not familiar with the term. Great evening.
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Apr 25, 2008
                                    Aye, that�s the way it is. I�ve just spent much of the evening with two
                                    Jordies (from Newcastle for those not familiar with the term. Great
                                    evening. There was also a Scouse (Liverpuddlian) and one Austrailian. They
                                    made Currie for the Chile Cook Off at the Houston International Seafarers�s
                                    Center. I did find my h�s vanishing while talking with the Scouser (I come
                                    by it honestly, me mum also being from Liverpoo.



                                    Shalom b'Yeshua haMoshiach,



                                    +Mar Michael Abportus

                                    Bishop of La Porte

                                    Pastor: Congregation Benim Avraham

                                    mjthannisch@...

                                    HYPERLINK
                                    "http://www.freewebs.com/childrenofabraham/"http://www.freewebs.com/children
                                    ofabraham/

                                    http://stores.lulu.com/store.php?fAcctID=1929216

                                    281-867-9081



                                    _____

                                    From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                                    Of PETER ROBINSON
                                    Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 10:52 AM
                                    To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: [liturgy-l] Re: accents, was Re: Naked Liturgist



                                    I retain my local accent from Barton-on-Humber in Lincolnshire, and some of
                                    the speech patterns that go with it - though it was somewhat modified by
                                    living in Yorkshire for several years. This occasionally causes a little
                                    confusion especiallu as there is a tendancy in that part of the world to
                                    omit "the" from a sentence. Hence my conversation with a new member of my
                                    parish

                                    Where are you from Father?

                                    Me: I'm from North of England

                                    So you are a Scot?

                                    Me: No - I grew up 30 mile from York. (then it dawns on me that I've done it
                                    again)

                                    Another linguistic quirk that sticks to me like glue - especially hen I am
                                    tired or not thinking about what I am saying - is the retention of thee and
                                    thou in the form of the word "tha" as in "what's tha doing; where's tha
                                    been; when tha's finished." Another one is as I walk out the house to go to
                                    work I'll usually say "I'll si thee, later."


                                    The Rev. Peter D. Robinson, F.S.S.M.
                                    Rector: St Paul's Anglican Church (UECNA), Prescott, AZ
                                    HYPERLINK
                                    "http://www.prescott-anglican.org"http://www.prescott--anglican.-org

                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                                  • Theodore Lorah
                                    David Strang wrote: ... College Misericordia placed a piece on Youtube called Heynabonics which will teach you to speak NE Pennsylvanian. The teacher uses
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Apr 26, 2008
                                      David Strang wrote:
                                      wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > The local anthracite region of NE Pennsylvania has its
                                      > own distinctive "coal-cracker" accent with a confusion
                                      > of "t" and "d" sounds and nasal "a" probably descending
                                      > from Eastern European immigrants.
                                      >


                                      College Misericordia placed a piece on Youtube called "Heynabonics"
                                      which will teach you to speak NE Pennsylvanian. The teacher uses
                                      perfect Scranton English throughout. It's only 4 minutes long, and it
                                      is quite funny--and accurate.

                                      Ted Lorah
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