Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [liturgy-l] Digest Number 249

Expand Messages
  • Art Hebbeler
    ... Interesting point made here, Robin. I ve struggled in conversation with folks at the seminary and on internship with making a new definition for shut in
    Message 1 of 38 , Jan 10, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      At 07:49 PM 1/9/2001 -0800, Robin Drake wrote:
      >On Fri, 29 December 2000, Doug Cowling wrote:
      ><SNIP>
      >I'm all in favor of the availability of anticipated/Saturday evening
      >services, as well as Sunday evening, to accomodate our varied
      >schedules. As a college student, I remember many dates which ended up at
      >a midnight Mass, and I have also gone to non-Sunday morning services to
      >have the opportunity for corporate worship and still keep a personal
      >schedule (either work or social).
      >
      >However, if we schedule other events into our personal calendars as worth
      >clearing time for, isn't it worth scheduling something like the Holy Week
      >services too? I usually plan to take at least a half day off on Good
      >Friday, and feel odd if I'm at work, and my entire schedule for that week
      >is built around the three evening services of the Triduum. To me, it's
      >well worth it, and I would encourage others to do likewise. There is
      >something very special about actually setting apart time for prayer and
      >worship at least occasionally, rather than just fitting it in as best one can.
      >
      >Shalom -
      >
      >Robin Drake

      Interesting point made here, Robin. I've struggled in conversation with
      folks at the seminary and on internship with making a new definition for
      "shut in" (a term I'm not keen on, but it will do). While there are many
      folks, like you, who can (or will) work their secular life around the
      church year, there are many others who simply can't do that. How many law
      enforcement, fire protection, taxi drivers, restaurant staff, etc, men and
      women are shift workers and unable to go to church on Sunday morning? Are
      these folks, "occupational shut ins" if you will, any less deserving of a
      visit by the pastor or Eucharistic minister than the 82 year old at home
      recovering from a broken hip? Sure, these shift workers will have SOME
      Sundays free (at least one would hope that would be the case), but not
      every week. How do we best minister to them?

      Would it be considered "bad form" to have, for example, a Tuesday morning
      or Thursday evening worship that is designed to meet the needs of the
      person who can't get to church on Sunday AM, and make the service known to
      one's ecumenical partners to share with their flocks? Roman and Episcopal
      congregations are much more likely to have a weekday service from my
      experience, but other than St Luke's (ELCA) Dundalk MD, I can't think of a
      regularly scheduled weekday Eucharist in the DC-Baltimore corridor (outside
      PECUA and Roman congregations).

      I don't have answers...but I hope some of you might.

      Peace
      Art
    • Avril Baigent
      ... In England! Middle of the road (dare I say mediocrity?) is what we do really well . . . Avril Avril Baigent Parish Pastoral Worker St Ethelbert s RC
      Message 38 of 38 , Jan 15, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Robert J. Riley wrote:

        > Where oh where is there a solid
        > middle-of-the-road parish these days?

        In England! Middle of the road (dare I say mediocrity?) is what we do
        really well . . .

        Avril

        Avril Baigent
        Parish Pastoral Worker
        St Ethelbert's RC Church
        Wellington Rd
        Slough
        SL1 1XU
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.