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Re: [liturgy-l] The Sanctoral Calendar - Problems and Solutions?

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  • Simon Kershaw
    ... Actually the September quarter day is 29 September, the Feast of the Archangel Michael. These four dates are still quarter days in English law. And of
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 6, 2007
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      Tom Poelker wrote:
      > The other quarter days are the feasts of the conception, 25
      > September, and birth, 25 June, of John the Baptist who was
      > already six months in the womb at the Annunciation to Mary.
      >

      Actually the September quarter day is 29 September, the Feast of the
      Archangel Michael. These four dates are still 'quarter days' in English law.

      And of course, the birth of John the Baptist is celebrated on 24 June,
      not 25 -- perhaps because June has only 30 days whereas March and
      December have 31 (and so the three feasts are '8' days before the
      Kalends in the Roman method of datng).

      simon

      --
      Simon Kershaw
      simon@...
      Saint Ives, Cambridgeshire
    • Simon Kershaw
      ... Depends who the saint is and how important the commemoration is. Whilst one might disrupt the lectio continua for an important commemoration, it is
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 6, 2007
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        Robert Lyons wrote:
        > Since I know that NO ONE is going to go for a proposal to radically
        > alter the liturgical year (well, except for me) what thoughts does
        > everyone have on the best ways to commemorate the feasts of saints?

        Depends who the saint is and how important the commemoration is. Whilst
        one might disrupt the lectio continua for an important commemoration, it
        is unnecessary to do so for every commemoration.

        Even so, with out interrupting the lectio continua one might have some
        or all of: a proper collect or 'opening prayer'; a brief sentence or two
        about the commemoration after the opening greeting; optionally an
        additional non-biblical reading; mention in the prayers of the faithful
        (or custom intercessions where appropriate and available) and/or in the
        eucharistic prayer; proper post-communion prayer; possibly the
        appropriate liturgical colour.

        All of these can also alludce to the season -- a commemoration which
        will often occur in Lent, for example, can have a proper collect at is
        Lenten as well as commemorating the person; one that is frequently in
        Eastertide can proclaim the resurrection as well as the commemoration.
        Similarly for any 'custom' intercessions / prayer of the faithful.

        simon

        --
        Simon Kershaw
        simon@...
        Saint Ives, Cambridgeshire
      • Tom Poelker
        I was referring to the dividing of the year into quarters by the dates of the conceptions and births of Jesus and John in accord with the cycle based on
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 6, 2007
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          I was referring to the dividing of the year into quarters by
          the dates of the conceptions and births of Jesus and John in
          accord with the cycle based on three-quarters of the year
          from conception to birth and Elizabeth being a half-year
          pregnant when Jesus was conceived as being on the same date
          when he died. Quartodecimans (sp?)of the world unite!

          I don't know why the English church has this anomaly with
          St. Michael.

          I just fell unconsciously into using the "quarter day"
          terminology. I've gotten myself into trouble other places
          when I use specific terminology without realizing it just
          because the words come trippingly to the tongue (That seems
          familiar.).

          Thank you for the correction and likely opinion on the
          dating of the feast of the birth of John the Baptist. I was
          writing from my memory of the theory rather than from my
          rather small memory of feast dates.

          Tom Poelker
          St. Louis, Missouri
          USA
          ---
          It is not we who do Christ the favor of
          worshiping him; it is Christ who
          empowers us by strengthening us, and
          enabling us to fight for the things that
          are worth fighting for, the things that endure;
          and that is a promise worth fighting for,
          worth dying for, and worth living for.
          -- Peter Gomes, "Strength for the Journey."



          simon@... wrote:
          >
          >
          > Tom Poelker wrote:
          > > The other quarter days are the feasts of the conception, 25
          > > September, and birth, 25 June, of John the Baptist who was
          > > already six months in the womb at the Annunciation to Mary.
          > >
          >
          > Actually the September quarter day is 29 September, the Feast of the
          > Archangel Michael. These four dates are still 'quarter days' in English law.
          >
          > And of course, the birth of John the Baptist is celebrated on 24 June,
          > not 25 -- perhaps because June has only 30 days whereas March and
          > December have 31 (and so the three feasts are '8' days before the
          > Kalends in the Roman method of datng).
          >
          > simon
          >
          > --
          > Simon Kershaw
          > simon@... <mailto:simon%40kershaw.org.uk>
          > Saint Ives, Cambridgeshire
          >
          >
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