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CHURCH AFFECTIVE DISORDER

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  • Gregory Holmes Singleton
    [This is being sent to individuals and a few selected lists. Therefore some of you may receive duplicate copies. I apologize if that is the case.] Dear
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 8, 2007
      [This is being sent to individuals and a few selected lists. Therefore some of you may receive duplicate copies. I apologize if that is the case.]

      Dear Friends,

      Over the past weeks we have been shriven, received ashes, gone through our symbolic forty days and forty nights, celebrated the Mandatum Novum, adored the cross, lit the New Fire, sung or heard the Exultet, attended to the readings summarizing Salvation History, renewed our baptismal vows, heard the proclamation "Christos anesti!" (in a variety of languages), responded "Alithos anesti!" (in a variety of languages), and celebrated the Resurrection by receiving the body and blood of our Lord.

      Exhausted, we now contemplate a week leading to "Low Sunday." I realize that the term is usually explained by reference to Easter II as the Octave of the Feast of the Resurrection, but it is also an apt term to use for the significantly smaller attendance following the huge crowds the previous Sunday. Alas, it is also indicative of the depressive condition many of us experience after the rigors of Holy Week, when tension is high and irritability can run rampant. This exacerbates a condition clinically known as Church Affective Disorder (CAD). While we see an increase in the symptoms during this week, it is a chronic condition suffered by many Christians throughout the liturgical year.

      It is, therefore, appropriate at this time we to turn out attention to the Center for the Study of Church Affective Disorder. Please visit our web site at

      http://www.neiu.edu/~ghsingle/CSCAD.htm

      Be certain to look at the "Classic Symptoms" link. Do any of them look familiar?

      Feel free to pass this along to Individuals or lists that may need some relief from CAD.

      Blessed Fifty Days,

      Greg

      Gregory Holmes Singleton, Ph.D.
      Professor of History, Emeritus: Northeastern Illinois University
      Adjunct Professor of History: Concordia University Chicago
      RESIDENT OLD CURMUDGEON in All Venues
      http://www.neiu.edu/~ghsingle

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