Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [liturgy-l] General Intercessions

Expand Messages
  • mjthannisch
    Prayers of the People form VI has a specific place for thanksgivings just before the general confession. My own congregation at the daily office places
    Message 1 of 33 , Dec 3, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Prayers of the People form VI has a specific place for thanksgivings just before the general confession. My own congregation at the daily office places specific thanksgivings just ahead of intercessions, while in the Eucharist, we have thanksgivings toward the end of the litany, together with specific intercessions.

      Shalom

      +Michael Joe Thannisch
      mjthan@...

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Tom Poelker
      To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 5:10 PM
      Subject: [liturgy-l] General Intercessions


      The intercessions are certainly prone to near infinite
      extension and items of questionable taste or privacy.

      Does anyone else have a problem with where to put
      thanksgivings?

      If we are praying the "General Intercessions," shouldn't we
      be limited to intercessory prayer at this point?

      Where is a good place to insert local prayers of
      thanksgiving? No place is provided in the RC Mass.

      Do other liturgical denominations have a designated place
      and style for local prayers of thanksgiving?

      Tom Poelker
      St. Louis, Missouri
      USA
      ---
      Falling in love consists merely in
      uncorking the imagination and
      bottling the common-sense.
      --- Helen Rowland

      ymcmlx@... wrote:
      > In my mind, the prayer of the church, i.e., thanksgivings and
      > petitions, are the weakest part of present liturgies. There seems to
      > be little distance between stale and run-amuck.
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • asteresplanetai
      ... while the information provided from the search results in the prior message was correct, a more particular response to Tom s question about
      Message 33 of 33 , Dec 4, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        +++

        > Posted by: "Tom Poelker" TomPoelker@... tapoelker
        > Date: Sun Dec 3, 2006 3:10 pm ((PST))
        >
        > John, thanks for these explanations.
        > However, how many orthodox patriarchs are there now?
        > I understand the five (counting Rome) ancient patriarchates,
        > but how does Moscow become a patriarchate? It seems to me
        > that I have heard others.

        > Posted by: "dlewisaao@..." dlewisaao@...

        > Here is info from a website on the above topic and more (look up
        > Orthodox
        > Patriarchates):

        <snip>

        while the information provided from the search results in the prior
        message was correct, a more particular response to Tom's question
        about patriarchal titles and autocephalies might be found at the
        Ecumenical Patriarch's website: http://www.ec-patr.org/en/links.htm

        There you will find the following list:

        five ancient patriarchates:

        [Patriarchate of Rome www.vatican.va]
        [Patriarchate of Constantinople, or] Ecum. Patriarchate
        www.patriarchate.org
        Patriarchate of Alexandria www.greekorthodox-alexandria.org
        Patriarchate of Antioch www.antiochpat.org
        Patriarchate of Jerusalem www.jerusalem-patriarchate.org

        five historical patriarchates:

        Patriarchate of Moscow www.mospat.ru
        Patriarchate of Serbia spc.org.yu
        Patriarchate of Romania www.patriarhia.ro
        Patriarchate of Bulgaria bulch.tripod.com/boc/
        Patriarchate of Georgia www.patriarchate.ge/

        seven (or eight) other autocephalous churches:

        Church of Cyprus
        Church of Greece www.ecclesia.gr
        Church of Albania www.orthodoxalbania.org
        Church of Poland www.orthodox.pl
        Church of Czech - Slovakia www.pravoslav.gts.cz
        Church of Finland www.ort.fi
        Church of Estonia www.orthodoxa.org

        In addition, the Orthododox Church in America (www.oca.org) is
        recognized as autocephalous by the "russian bloc" of churches (and
        thus by the vast majority of orthodox faithful in the world) but not
        by the "greek bloc", who have the ecumenical patriarch on their side.

        So, counting the OCA, there are seventeen Orthodox churches. As you
        can see, nine of their senior hierarchs have the title 'patriarch'.
        The others are styled either 'archbishop' or 'metropolitan'.

        The list does not mention the Autonomous Churches of Mount Sinai
        (which has only about 20 faithful but has been autonomous since it
        fell behind enemy lines in the muslim conquest and was therefore cut
        off from the rest of the orth. world), and of Japan, and there might
        be one or two more. Autonomous churches are self-governing
        archdioceses, but they are not fully autocephalous, because the
        elections of their hierarchs must be approved by their mother
        churches. Also, there is usually only one (arch)bishop there, and
        since it takes 3 bishops to make a new bishop, they have no choice
        but to invite the bishops of the mother church (for Sinai,
        Jerusalem; for Japan, the OCA) when they want to make a new one.

        The title 'patriarch' is historical, either assumed long ago by the
        see and then recognized by ecumenical synod, or awarded by an
        ecumenical synod. Otherwise, the titles of a church remain as they
        were upon receiving autocephaly. So in Greece the first hierarch is
        an archbishop, and 'metropolitan' is an honorific, whereas in the
        OCA, it's the other way around, following russian custom in which
        metropolitans are higher than archbishops.

        Regards from rainy kampala,

        john burnett
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.