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Re: [liturgy-l] germs in general

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  • Douglas Cowling
    ... During the SARS crisis in Toronto a couple of years ago, all of the churches took extraordinary measures regarding the common cup. The Anglican Bishop of
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 9 3:47 PM
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      On 8/9/06 5:36 PM, "LesandJon@..." <LesandJon@...> wrote:

      > I'm in a 2800-family Roman Catholic parish in Florida. We have about 120
      > Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion. At their recent meeting quite a
      > few
      > had attended parishes where EMHoCs cleansed their hands in the sanctuary
      > before distributing. In a couple of places Sani-gel was used. I was floored
      > that quite a few thought it was a wonderful idea.
      >
      > Have any of you experienced this?

      During the SARS crisis in Toronto a couple of years ago, all of the churches
      took extraordinary measures regarding the common cup. The Anglican Bishop
      of Toronto actually prohibited the reception of communion in both kinds for
      only the second time in history: the other was a typhoid epidemic in the
      mid-19th century.

      At that time, it became standard practice for all members of the sanctuary
      party in Anglican & Lutheran churches and many Catholic parishes to
      discreetly use an antiseptic hand wash at the credence table at the
      offertory. Most worshippers didn't even notice that ministers of communion
      also cleansed their hands before assisting.

      The washing of hands at the Lavabo began as a simple domestic act of hygiene
      before it was allegorized. I applaud churches where the clergy and
      ministers respect public health and unobtrusively take appropriate
      precautions.


      Doug Cowling
      Director of Music & Liturgical Arts
      Church of the Messiah, Toronto
    • DJP4LAW@aol.com
      We have at least one sacristan who is diligent about setting out sanitizing gel at the assistants places and encourages the assistants discreetly to clean
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 10 6:27 AM
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        We have at least one sacristan who is diligent about setting out sanitizing gel at the assistants' places and encourages the assistants discreetly to clean their hands after the sharing of the peace and before the communion. I find that it pleases me, if no one else, to do so before "setting the table" -- i.e., before touching the sacred vessels.

        >Tongue goes into cheek> In the past, for much of the year, germs were not an issue in Minnesota because the harsh winters would kill most of them off. (If you got infected with some because someone hacked during a public gathering, you just went outside and they were killed off.) Now, however, with global warming's proceeding great guns, we're more of a petri dish than anything. Consequently, the use of antibacterials (while they ought to be used sparingly) seems a wise thing to do. <Tongue now removed from cheek>

        --
        Peace
        Dwight Penas
        Minneapolis
        ____________________________
        The purpose of forgiveness is not simply to heal the guilt of the sinner, but the purpose of all love: to come into communion. -- Jon Sobrino
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