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RE: [liturgy-l] Re: Irish Christianity

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  • Michael Joe Thannisch
    And appreciated by another history nut. It is believed that the Irish and other Celtic monks were very well educated and spoke Greek and Latin as well as
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 29 2:11 PM
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      And appreciated by another history nut. It is believed that the Irish and
      other Celtic monks were very well educated and spoke Greek and Latin as well
      as their own native tongue. There is much to be said for trade languages
      affecting other languages as well.

      Shalom b'Yeshua haMoshiach,
      +Michael Joe Thannisch
      mjthan@...
      http://www.freewebs.com/childrenofabraham/
      http://www.christiansynod.org/index.htm
      281-303-3671

      _____

      From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      Of frpeterdr@...
      Sent: 29 July 2006 09:54
      To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [liturgy-l] Re: Irish Christianity



      My professor at college always warned us that it was easy to exaggerate
      the influence of the Romans in Britain. Latin was probably only the
      administrative and liturgical language in Britain with ancient Welsh
      being the language of the home for the poorer folk. Unlike most of
      France and Spain, where a debased form of Latin is still the everyday
      language, Latin soon disappeared as a living language in Britain being
      replaced by what we can conveniently call Old Welsh. As my ancestors
      were pushed Westwards into the Cornish peninsular, Wales, Cumbria, and
      Galloway, they were displaced by the Angles and the Saxons who spoke
      various Germanic dialects. In the case of Cumbria and Galloway,
      mingling with the English eventually led to the demise of the old
      language and the adoption of some form of English

      In Ireland there would have been some Latin used for trade purposes in
      ancient times,; possibly Greek too. Then, of course, there is the
      influence of the Church which introduced Latin as an academic language.
      That in itself would be enough to account for a lot of words of Latin
      derivation finding their way into the Irish tongue.

      Just a couple of thoughts from a history nut.

      The Very Rev. Peter D. Robinson
      Rector: St Paul's Anglican Church, Prescott, AZ
      Dean of Arizona, ACA:DOW
      http://www.prescott <http://www.prescottanglican.ozonez.com>
      anglican.ozonez.com






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