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Re: [liturgy-l] Spirit Theology [was Participation]

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  • Douglas Cowling
    ... This was certainly a theological controversory at the time that Pope John XXIII announced the development of a universal canon law for the Latin church.
    Message 1 of 61 , Jul 3, 2006
      On 7/3/06 12:14 PM, "James O'Regan" <oregan@...> wrote:

      > Precisely because one cannot control the Holy Spirit, one must ask if all
      > speech about the Holy Spirit is a matter of either/or: control or no control.
      > If
      > the Holy Spirit is much more complex than the matter of sovereignty, then
      > especially for liturgy, in which we make claims about the Holy Spirit, we
      > ought to take pains to understand what it is that the Holy Spirit does, what
      > we
      > claim for that action, when and where it happens and how we may detect it.

      This was certainly a theological controversory at the time that Pope John
      XXIII announced the development of a universal canon law for the Latin
      church. There were many who argued that the Church never had nor needed a
      law code because the nature of the Church was essentially pneumatic and
      Spirit-driven. And the Holy Spirit has an alarming tendency to blow where it
      listeth.

      Those who wanted a fixed black and white Constitution for the Church with an
      enforcing legal apparatus were disappointed when the code was promulgated
      because it was both a legal and theological document. For instance, the
      concept of the People of God was right up front before the juridical status
      of "persons" was enumerated.

      This is not a peculiarly Catholic dilemma between law and Spirit: every
      church which has a judicatory structure and process has to wrestle with the
      problem of Law and Spirit.

      Doug Cowling
      Director of Music & Liturgical Arts
      Church of the Messiah, Toronto
    • Douglas Cowling
      ... By the time of the Reformation, Compline had migrated with Vespers to the early afternoon and the two were sung as a continuous office. Hence, the first
      Message 61 of 61 , Aug 28, 2006
        On 8/28/06 1:46 AM, "Margaret metcalf" <mlfm1943@...> wrote:

        > ...Ap[parently late in the middle ages the
        > office of vespers was moved earlier in the day and
        > compline was often said in church. There were several
        > other accretions throughout the centuries.


        By the time of the Reformation, Compline had migrated with Vespers to the
        early afternoon and the two were sung as a continuous office. Hence, the
        first Anglican BCP conflated the two and sang both the Magnificat and the
        Nunc Dimittis. Vespers in Bach's time was sung at 1 pm.


        Doug Cowling
        Director of Music & Liturgical Arts
        Church of the Messiah, Toronto
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