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Re: Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic

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  • Olympiada
    Ray, I know this is ott but I really like this message. If you want to discuss it further, please feel free to contact me off list. I am exploring this subject
    Message 1 of 81 , Jun 30, 2006
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      Ray,
      I know this is ott but I really like this message. If you want to
      discuss it further, please feel free to contact me off list. I am
      exploring this subject in an Orthodox group if you are interested. It
      is very important to me right now.
      Olympiada
      > Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic
      > Posted by: "Ray Gadke" raygadke@...
      >
      > Thu Jun 29, 2006 3:43 pm (PST)
      > The Orthodox Church body now called "The Orthodox Church in America"
      > is composed, in large part, of the descendants of "Uniates" from the
      > former
      > Austro-Hungarian empire who came to the American shores in the late
      > 19th
      > and early 20th centuries. The Uniates were people whose ancestors had
      > been
      > Orthodox in what is now Ukraine, Poland, Hungary, and Rumania, but who
      > had accepted the authority of the Roman pope under pressure from the
      > kings
      > of Poland and the Hapsburg emperors of Austria during the so-called
      > Counter
      > or Catholic Reformation. The Uniates were permitted to keep the
      > Orthodox
      > liturgical tradition and the married priesthood, but had to accept the
      > authority of
      > the pope and the Vatican. These people considered themselves "Orthodox
      > in union with Rome." The Hapsburg ruler Maria Theresa gave the
      > Uniates in
      > her dominions the name "Greek Catholics" to distinguish them from the
      > Roman
      > Catholics, Orthodox, Protestants, and other Christians in Austria.
      > When
      > descendants of the these "Orthodox in union with Rome" came from
      > Galicia
      > and Carpatho-Russia to work in the mines and factories of the United
      > States,
      > they built churches in the New World that they identified as "Greek
      > Catholic."
      > For a number of reasons, including the refusal of the Roman
      > authorities -
      > at the request of the Roman Catholic bishops in the United States -
      > to permit
      > married priests to serve in America, large number of these Uniates
      > "returned"
      > to Orthodoxy, joining the Russian Orthodox Church, which already had
      > a presence
      > in the United States. The Uniate parishes that became Orthodox kept
      > the name
      > "Greek Catholic," adding "Russian Orthodox." This was done in part to
      > protect
      > church property, as these parishes had been founded and incorporated
      > as
      > "Greek Catholic." So you see churches identified as "Russian Orthodox
      > Greek
      > Catholic" and "Carpatho-Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic."
      >
      > Ray Gadke


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    • Tom Poelker
      I recently rejoined the History Book Club because they had desirable books on their introductory offer. One was THE OXFORD HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN WORSHIP.
      Message 81 of 81 , Jul 7, 2006
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        I recently rejoined the History Book Club because they had desirable
        books on their introductory offer.
        One was THE OXFORD HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN WORSHIP.
        Another was Jaroslav Pelikan's combined edition of JESUS THROUGH THE
        CENTURIES and MARY THROUGH THE CENTURIES.

        In reading the MARY book, I am finding footnote references to LTK which
        is not in his list of abbreviations. It appears to be a multivolume
        work from the way he cites pages preceded by a one digit number and a
        colon, then followed by a contributor's name. It might be fairly old
        because one contributor cited is Josef Andreas Jungman. Can anyone
        provide the title for LTK?

        The book club offer was four books at a dollar each plus S&H. You can
        access it at
        http://www.historybookclub.com

        I also recommend Biblical Archaeology Review (BAR -- where I got the HBC
        ad) for great photography of archaeology sites relevant to biblical
        studies and for informative and provocative articles. Definitely not
        for biblical literalists but for people of faith who believe that
        science can contribute toward understanding faith. Check out BAR at
        http://www.bib-arch.org/

        <>Tom Poelker
        St. Louis, Missouri
        USA
        --
        You know you're a bona fide
        Catholic, Lutheran or Episcopalian,
        when, while watching Star Wars, you hear,
        "May the Force be with you,"
        and you have an overwhelming urge to respond,
        "And also with you".
        --


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