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Re: [liturgy-l] Ash Wednesday and Lent

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  • dlewisaao@aol.com
    In a message dated 3/2/2006 9:17:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, fcsenn@sbcglobal.net writes: There should be no Mass or Eucharist on Ash Wednesday because it
    Message 1 of 67 , Mar 2, 2006
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      In a message dated 3/2/2006 9:17:45 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
      fcsenn@... writes:

      There should be no Mass or Eucharist on Ash Wednesday because it is a fast
      day. (We've been around and around on this before on this list. You don't
      feast and fast at the same time.) The fast begins at midnight, and therefore
      the first Ash Wednesday liturgy would be Matins, not Vespers. (I mean, what
      would one do with fat Tuesday---Mardi gras?) One might receive communion at
      the end of Wednesday. I think there's something to be said for saving
      communion for Sundays in Lent, not the days "of" Lent.



      I thought that historically the only day without a Mass would be Good Friday.

      The current ECUSA Prayer Book certainly allows for a Mass on Ash Wednesday,
      with certain penitential features added including the blessing and imposition
      of ashes.

      David Lewis



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Waller
      ... Frank, Could you clarify the error? I understand that the Kyrie is not originally penitential in nature and I know that the Roman Mass includes it within
      Message 67 of 67 , Mar 5, 2006
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        > Frank Senn wrote:
        >
        >> The reform of the Roman Mass in 1969 erred liturgically in troping the
        >> Kyrie with the penitential petitions.


        Frank,

        Could you clarify the error? I understand that the Kyrie is not originally
        penitential in nature and I know that the Roman Mass includes it within the
        penitential rite (at least in the 3rd option) but my impression is that the
        tropes are acclamations not penitential petitions.

        David
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