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Confession

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  • frpeterdr@webtv.net
    Dear David, I agree that fixed box times are a good idea. Currently I do 11.30am to noon on the first Saturday of the month and Saturdays before major
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 13, 2006
      Dear David,

      I agree that fixed "box" times are a good idea. Currently I do 11.30am
      to noon on the first Saturday of the month and Saturdays before major
      feasts such as Easter and Pentecost. I don't hear many folks, but at
      least I hear some, unlike in the days when they had to make an
      appointment.

      Yours,
      Fr Peter

      The Very Rev. Peter D. Robinson
      Rector: St Paul's Anglican Church, Prescott, AZ
      Dean of Arizona, ACA:DOW
      http://www.prescottanglican.ozonez.com
    • Shawn Shafer
      On a tangent from the current discussion, may I ask those priests that have regularly scheduled times for confession how they use that time? Do you sit in
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 13, 2006
        On a tangent from the current discussion, may I ask those priests that have
        regularly scheduled times for confession how they use that time? Do you sit
        in contemplation in the confessional, or other designated area, waiting for
        confessors? If so, have you come to value that time, regardless of whether
        or not you've heard confessions?

        I wonder if there's not some small amount of good for a priest to regularly
        have this time of contemplation, waiting, wanting to proclaim the mercy of
        God on his loved ones and pronounce their absolution in the name of Christ.

        ---
        Shawn Shafer
        Boise, Idaho
      • James Morgan
        My Episcopal priest back in the late 50s used to do his intercessions for everyone in the parish, and some serious spiritual reading while waiting for people.
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 13, 2006
          My Episcopal priest back in the late 50s used to do his intercessions for
          everyone in the parish, and some serious spiritual reading while waiting for
          people. As he was a very 'social' person, it was sometimes hard for him to
          be 'alone' in the church, until he remembered that God was there with him!

          Rdr. James
          Olympia, WA

          PS, not to belabor a point, but I think there is a psychological value in
          the idea of having a service on Saturday evening (Vespers, Evening Prayer,
          Compline, whatever! That way, the people who want to come for confession
          can engage in worship together and prepare for Sunday communally as well.
          I've noticed in the Orthodox church that Saturday vespers can be kind of
          'sparse' until we start gearing up for Lent (or Pascha or Christmas) and
          then more people start showing up, in order to come to confession.


          -----Original Message-----
          From: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com [mailto:liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of Shawn Shafer
          Sent: Monday, February 13, 2006 11:44 AM
          To: liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [liturgy-l] Confession

          On a tangent from the current discussion, may I ask those priests that have
          regularly scheduled times for confession how they use that time? Do you sit
          in contemplation in the confessional, or other designated area, waiting for
          confessors? If so, have you come to value that time, regardless of whether
          or not you've heard confessions?

          I wonder if there's not some small amount of good for a priest to regularly
          have this time of contemplation, waiting, wanting to proclaim the mercy of
          God on his loved ones and pronounce their absolution in the name of Christ.

          ---
          Shawn Shafer
          Boise, Idaho
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