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Re: [liturgy-l] Re: UCC Rites

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  • Chris Arnold
    Dear James, I think it might be poor form to post them on the list. I could email them to you directly, perhaps. Which ones would you like? -Chris ... --
    Message 1 of 15 , Nov 30, 2005
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      Dear James,
      I think it might be poor form to post them on the list. I could email them
      to you directly, perhaps. Which ones would you like?

      -Chris


      > > Chris,
      > >
      > >> The UCC orders of worship from the New Century Hymnal and the Book of
      > >> Worship are all online in PDF format at
      > >> http://www.ucc.org/worship/tnch/
      > >
      > > For some reason, my computer will not allow the PDF to be opened.
      > > Could you post the Orders of Service on here?
      > >
      > > James
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at
      > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To write to the
      > > owners/moderators, please send an email to:
      > > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.com
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > "Faith is believing that one of two things will happen," she said.
      > "That there will be something solid for you to stand on -- Or that you
      > will be taught to fly."
      >
      >
      >
      > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/Towrite to the owners/moderators, please send an email to:
      > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.com
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      --
      Christopher Arnold
      Seminarian, Church Divinity School of the Pacific
      http://www.somethingunderstood.org


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • RIRevShev@aol.com
      In a message dated 12/1/2005 9:46:19 AM Eastern Standard Time, oregan@jamesoregan.com writes: Thanks for that. I had found the site previously but the actual
      Message 2 of 15 , Dec 1, 2005
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        In a message dated 12/1/2005 9:46:19 AM Eastern Standard Time,
        oregan@... writes:
        Thanks for that. I had found the site previously
        but the actual PDF file was not available. There
        appears to be a bad link.
        I had no trouble accessing the site and all of the PDF files yesterday. Try
        right clicking the service title with your mouse, then choose "Save as" and the
        file should appear on your hard drive.

        "Semper Gumby!" ("Always Flexible!")
        (The Rev.) Linda A. Shevlin
        6 Ash Street
        Cumberland, RI 02864
        Cellular Phone: 401-529-4584
        RIRevShev@...


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ray Gadke
        One of the antecedents of the United Church of Christ, the Reformed Church in the United States, experienced an interesting high church movement during the
        Message 3 of 15 , Dec 1, 2005
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          One of the antecedents of the United Church of Christ, the
          Reformed Church in the United States, experienced an interesting "high
          church" movement during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
          Centered around the seminary in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, the liturgical
          movement in the Reformed Church in the United States (of German origin,
          as opposed to the Reformed Church in America, which is of Dutch background)
          was called the "Mercersburg Movement." Reformed church buildings influenced
          by the Mercersburg Movement introduced divided chancels, altars rather than
          communion tables, vested choirs, and the clergy in the movement dressed
          like their peers in the Episcopal Church or in the Lutheran churches affected
          by the beginning of the liturgical movement in the old UCLA - cassock or gown,
          surplice and stole. The Order of Worship in "The Hymnal of the Evangelical &
          Reformed Church" and the Evangelical & Reformed Church "Book of Worship"
          was/is, as Pastor White describes it, almost identical with the Lutheran
          Common
          Service - and both drew heavily on Anglican worship. The old E & R hymnal
          included a number of the chants used in the Episcopal Church in their1940
          Hymnal. As Pastor White points out, the Evangelical Synod of North America,
          which merged with the Reformed Church in the United States in 1934, was of
          German Lutheran background, and the Evangelical Book of Worship was based
          on that of the Lutheran churches in Europe. My guess is that there is a
          very wide
          range of worship in the current United Church of Christ, just as there is a
          very
          broad range of theological belief.

          Ray Gadke



          At 04:44 PM 11/30/2005, you wrote:
          >On 11/30/2005 6:37 AM, James O'Regan wrote:
          > > I am interested to know what the communion
          > > service of the United Church of Christ might look
          > > like. Does anyone have their Book of Worship?
          >
          >Since you've had your initial question answered, this may be more
          >information that you want, but anyway--
          >
          >According to the UCC web site: "On Tuesday, June 25, 1957, at the
          >Uniting General Synod in Cleveland, Ohio, the Evangelical and Reformed
          >Church, 23 years old, passionate in its impulse to unity, committed to
          >"liberty of conscience inherent in the Gospel," and the Congregational
          >Christian Churches, 26 years old, a fellowship of biblical people living
          >under a covenant for responsible freedom in Christ, joined together as
          >the United Church of Christ."
          >
          > From a Lutheran liturgical perspective, the interesting piece of that
          >merger was the E&R. I don't know what worship looked like in the other
          >two traditions. The E side of the E&R was in many ways "Lutheran"
          >particularly in its worship. In 1987, I served the Lutheran side of
          >"Union Church" (Lutheran and UCC inhabiting [not always peacefully] the
          >same building). The UCC's had been E&R (and before that E) and were
          >still using to old Evangelical Worship Book (rebound perhaps because the
          >books were old, or perhaps to blur the predecessor body's connections).
          >The liturgy was what I had grown up with in the Common Service Book --
          >the liturgical and hymn book of most North American Lutherans from
          >around 1900 to 1958. There may well be some UCC congregations (perhaps
          >that one back in Central Pennsylvania) still using the old books.
          >
          >Bob
          >
          >--
          >It isn't that they can't see the solution.
          >It is that they can't see the problem.
          >-----G.K. Chesterton
          >
          >Bob White
          >Lordstown Lutheran Church
          >Lordstown, Ohio
        • James
          Chris, ... Thank you very much, but that is okay. James
          Message 4 of 15 , Dec 1, 2005
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            Chris,

            > Which ones would you like?

            Thank you very much, but that is okay.

            James
          • James O'Regan
            ... Ah-ha, I had not noticed the list of PDF files. I had been clicking on a Book of Worship link that was bad. Thanks. James O Regan
            Message 5 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
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              Linda wrote and I snipped:

              > I had no trouble accessing the site and all of the PDF files
              > yesterday.

              Ah-ha, I had not noticed the list of PDF files. I had been clicking on a
              Book of Worship link that was bad.

              Thanks.

              James O'Regan
            • Hugh Graham
              I m not sure that the Mercersburg liturgy can be said to have drawn heavily on Anglican worship certainly looking at the communion service in the E&R
              Message 6 of 15 , Dec 2, 2005
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                I'm not sure that the Mercersburg liturgy can be said to have 'drawn heavily
                on Anglican worship' certainly looking at the communion service in the E&R
                worship book the heaviest influence is still that of the Catholic
                Apostolics.

                Hugh Graham

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Ray Gadke" <raygadke@...>
                To: <liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2005 6:23 PM
                Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] UCC Rites


                > One of the antecedents of the United Church of Christ, the
                > Reformed Church in the United States, experienced an interesting "high
                > church" movement during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
                > Centered around the seminary in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, the liturgical
                > movement in the Reformed Church in the United States (of German origin,
                > as opposed to the Reformed Church in America, which is of Dutch
                background)
                > was called the "Mercersburg Movement." Reformed church buildings
                influenced
                > by the Mercersburg Movement introduced divided chancels, altars rather
                than
                > communion tables, vested choirs, and the clergy in the movement dressed
                > like their peers in the Episcopal Church or in the Lutheran churches
                affected
                > by the beginning of the liturgical movement in the old UCLA - cassock or
                gown,
                > surplice and stole. The Order of Worship in "The Hymnal of the
                Evangelical &
                > Reformed Church" and the Evangelical & Reformed Church "Book of Worship"
                > was/is, as Pastor White describes it, almost identical with the Lutheran
                > Common
                > Service - and both drew heavily on Anglican worship. The old E & R hymnal
                > included a number of the chants used in the Episcopal Church in their1940
                > Hymnal. As Pastor White points out, the Evangelical Synod of North
                America,
                > which merged with the Reformed Church in the United States in 1934, was of
                > German Lutheran background, and the Evangelical Book of Worship was based
                > on that of the Lutheran churches in Europe. My guess is that there is a
                > very wide
                > range of worship in the current United Church of Christ, just as there is
                a
                > very
                > broad range of theological belief.
                >
                > Ray Gadke
                >
                >
                >
                > At 04:44 PM 11/30/2005, you wrote:
                > >On 11/30/2005 6:37 AM, James O'Regan wrote:
                > > > I am interested to know what the communion
                > > > service of the United Church of Christ might look
                > > > like. Does anyone have their Book of Worship?
                > >
                > >Since you've had your initial question answered, this may be more
                > >information that you want, but anyway--
                > >
                > >According to the UCC web site: "On Tuesday, June 25, 1957, at the
                > >Uniting General Synod in Cleveland, Ohio, the Evangelical and Reformed
                > >Church, 23 years old, passionate in its impulse to unity, committed to
                > >"liberty of conscience inherent in the Gospel," and the Congregational
                > >Christian Churches, 26 years old, a fellowship of biblical people living
                > >under a covenant for responsible freedom in Christ, joined together as
                > >the United Church of Christ."
                > >
                > > From a Lutheran liturgical perspective, the interesting piece of that
                > >merger was the E&R. I don't know what worship looked like in the other
                > >two traditions. The E side of the E&R was in many ways "Lutheran"
                > >particularly in its worship. In 1987, I served the Lutheran side of
                > >"Union Church" (Lutheran and UCC inhabiting [not always peacefully] the
                > >same building). The UCC's had been E&R (and before that E) and were
                > >still using to old Evangelical Worship Book (rebound perhaps because the
                > >books were old, or perhaps to blur the predecessor body's connections).
                > >The liturgy was what I had grown up with in the Common Service Book --
                > >the liturgical and hymn book of most North American Lutherans from
                > >around 1900 to 1958. There may well be some UCC congregations (perhaps
                > >that one back in Central Pennsylvania) still using the old books.
                > >
                > >Bob
                > >
                > >--
                > >It isn't that they can't see the solution.
                > >It is that they can't see the problem.
                > >-----G.K. Chesterton
                > >
                > >Bob White
                > >Lordstown Lutheran Church
                > >Lordstown, Ohio
                >
                >
                >
                > Visit the liturgy-l homepage at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/liturgy-l/To
                write to the owners/moderators, please send an email to:
                > liturgy-l-owner@yahoogroups.com
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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