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Re: [liturgy-l] Unordained Gospeller

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  • Derek Pratt
    While many references are being made to specific rubrics in the BCP of the ECUSA, do similar rubrics occur in other Anglican Prayer Books? Here in South
    Message 1 of 36 , Nov 1, 2005
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      While many references are being made to specific rubrics in the BCP of the
      ECUSA, do similar rubrics occur in other Anglican Prayer Books? Here in
      South Africa the "Anglican Prayer Book 1989" has a scarcity of rubric and
      those that are there are so wide you can drive a bus through them.
      Concerning the reading of the Gospel , it lays it out as follows

      General Rubric for the Eucharist 1 says "The Priest presides in absence of
      the Bishop. He [sic] may ask lay persons to rtake sections 4-13 [after the
      greeting till the confession], 17-20 [The Word of God up to the Hymn or
      Canticle before the gospel] and 27-40 [Prayers of the Church up to the
      peace]. It is the privilege of a deacon to read the Gospel. A deacon or a
      lay minister who is so licensed may preach." So it does not specifically
      say that in the absence of a deacon the presider or priest must read the
      Gospel and because of this many Anglican clergy in South Africa get a lay
      person/minister to the read the gospel "in order to preserve the priest's
      voice" for the sermon and the Ecuharistic Prayer etc.

      At my own parish I have an assistant who is the university chaplian as well
      as a retired priest who assists with the distribution. Whoever is not
      preaching reads the Gospel.

      Derek Pratt
      St Paul's
      Rondebosch, Cape Town, South Africa
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Daniel Lawson" <k95dl01@...>
      To: <liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, October 31, 2005 9:27 PM
      Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Unordained Gospeller


      > On Oct 31, 2005, at 12:42 PM, David Wisner wrote:
      >
      >> As I recall, the rubrics contained in the '79 BCP's "Additional
      >> Directions"
      >> for the Eucharist state that "In the absence of a priest, all of
      >> the above
      >> [i.e., through the Prayers of the People] may be said by a deacon,
      >> or, if
      >> there is no deacon, by a lay reader." That would imply that Prayer
      >> Book
      >> rubrics do indeed allow someone not in holy orders to read the
      >> Gospel during
      >> an antecommunion-type service.
      >
      > The key line there, though, seems to be "in the absence of a priest"
      > -- if this is a celebration of Holy Eucharist, which would mean a
      > priest or bishop were present, there isn't a rubric authorizing a lay
      > person to read the Gospel in English. The other key rubric is the
      > one that states that "When a portion of the congregation is composed
      > of persons whose native tongue is other than English, a reader
      > appointed by the celebrant may read the Gospel in the language of the
      > people, either in place of, or in addition to, the Gospel in English."
      >
      > Peace,
      > Daniel Lawson
      >
      >
      >
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    • Pastor Art Hebbeler STS
      James: Ah, those were the days, when we fought over things of some import--liturgy, theology, and such--rather than sex, secularism, and the like. As my bishop
      Message 36 of 36 , Nov 2, 2005
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        James:

        Ah, those were the days, when we fought over things of some import--liturgy,
        theology, and such--rather than sex, secularism, and the like.

        As my bishop says often, "Oh, for a good heresy trial!"



        Art Hebbeler
        --This message has been virus-checked prior to sending--

        | -----Original Message-----
        |
        | Scott,
        |
        | You are right that charges can be brought against priests for
        | violating the rubrics of the Book of Common Prayer. During the mid to
        | late 1800s, many ecclesiastical trials were held, because some priests
        | were practitioners of "ritualism" or "Romanism." From this persecution
        | grew the Anglo-Catholic Movement of the Anglican Communion.
        |
        | James
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