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Re: [liturgy-l] Questions answered was Re: Since things seem quiet

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  • Douglas Cowling
    ... I d be interested in what you mean by steeped in the Catholic traditon . The Prayers for the conversion of Russia were added to the order of low mass by
    Message 1 of 48 , Sep 4, 2005
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      On 9/4/05 11:00 AM, "nataliemoreau2000" <nataliemoreau2000@...> wrote:

      > But all those decisions were steeped in the Catholic tradition. The
      > Leonine prayers were after Mass I think.
      >

      I'd be interested in what you mean by "steeped in the Catholic traditon".

      The Prayers for the conversion of Russia were added to the order of low mass
      by Leo XIII (1884) and Pius XI (1934) Although they were technically
      "after" the mass -- the way the Asperges was "before" the mass -- they have
      no precedent and were freshly composed. The mass knew no commemoration of
      St. Joseph in the canon for 19 centuries. The "In nomine Patris" was part
      of the official private prayers of the celebrant and had never been part of
      the rite. The "Divine Mercy" devotion is less than a century old.

      All of these cases are examples of the private pieties of a pope being
      inserted into the liturgy of the church of the universal church. It's worth
      pointing out that these are all small flourishes to the liturgy and did not
      have significant theological impact.

      Doug Cowling
      Director of Music & Liturgical Arts
      Church of the Messiah, Toronto
    • Frank Senn
      As was noted on a previus post, German sang; the Irish didn t. Lutherans also sang German Catholic hymns such as All creatures of all our God and King (set
      Message 48 of 48 , Sep 7, 2005
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        As was noted on a previus post, German sang; the Irish didn't. Lutherans also sang German Catholic hymns such as "All creatures of all our God and King" (set to Lasst uns erfreuen), "Holy God we praise your name" (Grosser Gott), and "Lo, how a rose e're blooming" (Es ist ein Rose entsprungen). Hymnody has been an ecumenical expression. "O sacred head, now wounded" is a text amplified by Paul Gerhadt from Bernard of Clairvaux. "Fath of our fathers" is, I believe, a Catholic hymn extolling confessors of the faith persecuted by Protestants, now sung lustily by Protestants.

        Frank C. Senn

        Scott Knitter <scottknitter@...> wrote:
        It's interesting to recall that one of the first few hymns we sang in
        RC churches in the 1960s was that great Catholic standard, "A mighty
        fortress." :) It was quite a few years later that I learned it is a
        Lutheran fight song. In fact, many of the hymns I remember from my
        early days were sung to German chorale tunes: "Praise to the Lord,
        the Almighty," "On this day, the first of days," "O sacred head."
        Other hymns often used included "Beautiful Savior" and "Faith of our
        fathers."


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