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Re: [liturgy-l] Redemptionis Sacramentum.

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  • cantor03@aol.com
    This new Vatican document has been getting a lot of publicity, and locally it was the front page lead article in the Diocesan weekly. The text is quite
    Message 1 of 35 , May 1 10:05 AM
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      This new Vatican document has been getting a lot of publicity, and
      locally it was the front page lead article in the Diocesan weekly.

      The text is quite lengthy, but here are a couple of paragraphs that
      seem interesting to me:


      <<<[40.] Nevertheless, from the fact that the liturgical celebration
      obviously entails activity, it does not follow that everyone must necessarily have
      something concrete to do beyond the actions and gestures, as if a certain
      specific liturgical ministry must necessarily be given to the individuals to be
      carried out by them. Instead, catechetical instruction should strive diligently to
      correct those widespread superficial notions and practices often seen in
      recent years in this regard, and ever to instill anew in all of Christ's faithful
      that sense of deep wonder before the greatness of the mystery of faith that is
      the Eucharist, in whose celebration the Church is forever passing from what is
      obsolete into newness of life: "in novitatem a vetustate".101 For in the
      celebration of the Eucharist, as in the whole Christian life which draws its power
      from it and leads toward it, the Church, after the manner of Saint Thomas the
      Apostle, prostrates herself in adoration before the Lord who was crucified,
      suffered and died, was buried and arose, and perpetually exclaims to Him who is
      clothed in the fullness of His divine splendor: "My Lord and my God!"102>>>

      The local Catholic weekly summaraized that by "Standing, sitting, and
      kneeling, singing,
      reciting prayers and praying in silence are all part of an active
      participation in the Mass."


      <<<[42.] It must be acknowledged that the Church has not come together by
      human volition; rather, she has been called together by God in the Holy Spirit,
      and she responds through faith to His free calling (thus the word ekklesia is
      related to klesis, or "calling").106 Nor is the Eucharistic Sacrifice to be
      considered a "concelebration", in the univocal sense, of the Priest along with
      the people who are present.107 On the contrary, the Eucharist celebrated by the
      Priests "is a gift which radically transcends the power of the community....
      The community that gathers for the celebration of the Eucharist absolutely
      requires an ordained Priest, who presides over it so that it may truly be a
      Eucharistic convocation. On the other hand, the community is by itself incapable of
      providing an ordained minister".108 There is pressing need of a concerted will
      to avoid all ambiguity in this matter and to remedy the difficulties of
      recent years. Accordingly, terms such as "celebrating community" or "celebrating
      assembly" (in other languages "asamblea celebrante", "assemblée célébrante",
      "assemblea celebrante") and similar terms should not be used injudiciously.>>>>>


      Thus, the Vatican would seem to differ strongly with the many who have given
      the "celebrating assembly" term a broader meaning.

      <<<[71.] The practice of the Roman Rite is to be maintained according to
      which the peace is extended shortly before Holy Communion. For according to the
      tradition of the Roman Rite, this practice does not have the connotation either
      of reconciliation or of a remission of sins, but instead signifies peace,
      communion and charity before the reception of the Most Holy Eucharist.151 It is
      rather the Penitential Act to be carried out at the beginning of Mass
      (especially in its first form) which has the character of reconciliation among brothers
      and sisters.>>>

      This seems to eliminate any likely moving of the Peace to a position before
      the Offertory.



      <<<[112.] Mass is celebrated either in Latin or in another language,
      provided that liturgical texts are used which have been approved according to the
      norm of law. Except in the case of celebrations of the Mass that are scheduled by
      the ecclesiastical authorities to take place in the language of the people,
      Priests are always and everywhere permitted to celebrate Mass in Latin.200>>>


      There was some question about this on another list. On a practical level,
      does this
      mean that the local RC priest here in my Pocono Valley could, on a whim, just
      decide to change, say, the 8AM Sunday Mass into Roman Rite Latin Mass, or
      would he likely have to run this by the Diocesan Chancellory first?

      David Strang.









      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Michael Joe Thannisch
      You are quite correct. Those who helped prepare the 1979 BCP wanted a single chalice and loaf to make the statement that we are one body. Shalom B Yeshua
      Message 35 of 35 , May 13 4:33 PM
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        You are quite correct. Those who helped prepare the 1979 BCP wanted a
        single chalice and loaf to make the statement that we are one body.

        Shalom B'Yeshua HaMoshiach

        Michael Joe Thannisch
        mjthan@...

        The beginning of wisdom is fear of the Lord.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Ormonde Plater" <oplater@...>
        To: <liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2004 6:18 AM
        Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Re: Redemptionis Sacramentum.


        > > My impression is that the quasi-requirement in the Episcopal Church that
        > > only one chalice may be on the altar during the consecration is also
        > > motivated by "a concern about reverence for the Sacrament" -- that at
        the
        > > Last Supper there was only one chalice.
        >
        > The governing rubric states: "During the Great Thanksgiving, it is
        > appropriate that there be only one chalice on the Altar, and, if need be,
        a
        > flagon of wine from which additional chalices may be filled after the
        > Breaking of the Bread."
        >
        > Rather than a replication of the Last Supper, I think it has to do with
        the
        > symbolism of unity--one cup, one loaf. This theme is picked up in some of
        > our fraction anthems: e.g., "One body are we, alleluia, for though many we
        > share one bread." Of course, one sometimes sees one cup (and one or more
        > flagons, depending on the size of the congregation) but multiple wafers.
        > Liturgical renewal still has a ways to go.
        >
        > Ormonde Plater
        > oplater@...
        >
        > Christos anesti!
        >
        >
        >
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