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Re: [liturgy-l] Pastors

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  • Michael Joe Thannisch
    No, I have always heard Preist, both from Texas German s and German Germans. Shalom in Yeshua Ha Moshiach Michael Joe Thannisch mjthan@quik.com
    Message 1 of 71 , Oct 2, 2003
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      No, I have always heard Preist, both from Texas German's and German Germans.

      Shalom in Yeshua Ha Moshiach

      Michael Joe Thannisch
      mjthan@...
      http://episcopalanglicanresources.com
      www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ridge/4120/
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <fcsenn@...>
      To: <liturgy-l@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 9:54 AM
      Subject: Re: [liturgy-l] Pastors


      > In a message dated 10/1/2003 11:24:07 PM Central Standard Time,
      > mjthan@... writes:
      >
      > > In German the Lutherans continued to use the word priest (still do)
      > >
      >
      > Do you mean Pfarrer? Scandinavians use the term "Praest." However, this
      is
      > generic. The head of a parish in Germany is "Pastor." This was the use
      > before the Reformation. That's where Lutherans got it from (also the
      Reformed).
      > In Sweden the head of a parish is the Kyrkoherde (church shepherd).
      Same
      > idea de-Latinized.
      >
      > FCSenn
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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    • cantor03@aol.com
      In a message dated 10/5/03 3:20:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time, przip@compuserve.com writes:
      Message 71 of 71 , Oct 5, 2003
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        In a message dated 10/5/03 3:20:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        przip@... writes:

        <<
        One of my parishioners, an immigrant from Germany, calls me "Herr Pharrer"
        wwhen addressing me in German.
        >>

        And, undoubtedly, your wife [if you are married] as "Frau Herr Pharrer."

        When I lived in Frankfurt/Main, we sent patients to the U. Frankfurt for
        x-ray therapy for skin cancers. Everything was channeled through the
        Professor and Department Chairman. Unless our US Army receptionist
        making the appointment referred to him as "Herr Doktor Professor Hermann,"
        the receptionist at U. Frankfurt would refuse to make the appointment.

        Professor Hermann's wife was properly called
        "Frau Herr Doktor Professor Hermann."

        David Strang.
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