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Re: [linuxham] Re: SoftRock RX/TX Ubuntu Fldigi Configuration

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  • John Williams
    Are you running wspr on linux? Running on windows ok means we are looking at linux config problems still. BTW, I had it working on both pulse audio and
    Message 1 of 49 , Jan 3, 2012
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      Are you running wspr on linux? Running on windows ok means we are looking at linux config problems still.

      BTW, I had it working on both pulse audio and portaudio. The waterfall was stronger on pulse.

      What does aplay -l show?

      John

      On 1/3/2012 5:26 PM, John wrote:
       

      And we know that the SoftRock is working well on this dual boot machine. You can see my WSPR 20M traffic at 23:23

      73 TI4/N0URE

      --- In linuxham@yahoogroups.com, w1hkj <w1hkj@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 01/03/2012 10:26 AM, John wrote:
      > > When I start fldigg I get 'trx/trx.cxx.216 PulseAudio error: Connection refused'
      > >
      > > John
      > Do you have the PulseAudio server running?
      >
      > Dave
      >


      -- 
      
      John Williams
      
      KE5SSH - ham since 2007
      WQKA523 - GMRS for family use on the farm
      
    • Woodchuck
      ... True enough. I just tired of typing sudo a few hundred times, then forgetting it. Yeah, I skunked a couple of systems when I was green root, not often
      Message 49 of 49 , Jan 6, 2012
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        On Wed, Jan 04, 2012 at 08:52:27PM -0500, Gmail wrote:
        >
        >
        > A few corrections inline...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > > Modern practice involves giving the user the counsel to never
        > > login as "root", or to "su" to root, but to use "sudo". This
        > > advice is just pure garbage in my (40 years) experience. You
        > > can do exactly the same damage with sudo as by any other means.
        >
        >
        > But it does make it easier to figure out who borked the system. As long as you
        > log sudo anyway.

        True enough. I just tired of typing "sudo" a few hundred times, then
        forgetting it.

        Yeah, I skunked a couple of systems when I was green root, not often any more.

        Yesterday I went to delete some "dot" files in /, saw myself type
        #rm -r /* instead of #rm /.* But I caught it. I was thinking about this
        thread at the time... No sudo would have saved me, of course. Vigilance
        and a brief pause before pressing return.

        ....
        > VMS originated with the Digital VAX line of computers in the late 70's to take
        > advantage of their 'Virtual Memory Architecture', previously restricted to
        > mainframes. UNIX predates the appearance of the VAX by quite a bit, having run
        > on the PDP-7 in 1969. (hence the 'epoch' date and our upcoming y2k36 problem.

        True, true. 1969? PDP-7? I'd have said 1972 or 1974, and guessed PDP-8.

        There are those who argue that the oldest Unix ("Unics") written in B and
        assembler wasn't "really" Unix until written in C for the PDP-10. For the
        youngsters, "Unics" came from "Multics" (see below) and the name was a jest,
        meaning "Single-user Multics", an oxymoron.

        Others swear by System 7 as the Ur-Unix. "An improvement on all its predecessors
        and successors," someone famous (Ritchie?) once remarked. It was nice.

        > Digital cooperated with Microsoft on the design and implementation of NT. It,
        > in fact, was one of the operating systems that ran on the DEC Alpha processor,
        > which was much more powerful than it's intel contemporaries.

        Yup. Alphas were sweet. I used to run a couple of MIPS Pmaxes at
        home, rescued from a dumpster at a well-known private university,
        also a decent box. (To their credit, they didn't toss them in the
        dumpster right away, just stacked them with monitors, keyboards and
        mice neatly nearby for a few days until they "evaporated") 19"
        screen, 2-level frame buffer. Ran Netscape and OpenBSD 2.1 with
        X10 on them.

        MickeySoft actually funded and participated in the and X-Window project, but
        decided not to adopt X. Which was too bad for them.

        > The permissions concepts of VMS, UNIX, and NT can be traced back to Multics.

        Yup. A fine system, which ought to be resurrected now that we have the proper
        hardware to realize its potential. Imagine it on a blade farm... (For those
        unfamiliar, Multics was conceived as a "compute utility", what is now called
        "cloud computing".)

        > > I suggest a paper bound book, a nice fireplace and an easy chair.
        >
        >
        > For some history on UNIX proper, check out the Bell System Technical Journal.
        > Many great articles over the years. A book is a good companion outside of a
        > dog...:)

        You don't have to walk it, and it feeds you.

        > I only get picky about the history because I wrote some of the code that was in
        > some of the operating systems along the way. :)

        I welcome pickiness, and thank you for picking at my loose history.

        Dave
        --
        In each of us, there burns a soul of a woodchuck.
        In every generation a few are chosen to prove it.
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