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Time sure flies by

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  • Joan Leach
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/23/microsoft_windows3_birthday/ I wish I had known about Unix/Linux way back then, because I remember I hated the GUI and
    Message 1 of 4 , May 23, 2013
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      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/23/microsoft_windows3_birthday/
      I wish I had known about Unix/Linux way back then, because I remember I hated the GUI and the mouse for the longest time. I still have my DOS floppies and it's only been a few years since I let my 486 go to a new home.
      I remember my A+ Class/Linux professor was surprised I knew about the piping symbol from DOS scripting I managed to learn a bit of.
      Joan in Reno






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • ed
      ... The Register, source of inaccuracies, Windows 3.0 did not give the world a file manager, it already existed in many forms, particularly XTree:
      Message 2 of 4 , May 29, 2013
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        On Thu, May 23, 2013 at 11:29:46PM -0700, Joan Leach wrote:
        > http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/23/microsoft_windows3_birthday/
        > I wish I had known about Unix/Linux way back then, because I remember I hated the GUI and the mouse for the longest time. I still have my DOS floppies and it's only been a few years since I let my 486 go to a new home.
        > I remember my A+ Class/Linux professor was surprised I knew about the piping symbol from DOS scripting I managed to learn a bit of.
        > Joan in Reno

        The Register, source of inaccuracies, Windows 3.0 did not give the world
        a file manager, it already existed in many forms, particularly XTree:

        <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XTree>

        Sadly, Windows absorbed many of the good features that XTree had and
        that now ceases to exist, if there was a place for patent protection,
        then XTree should have had it, for navigation and features, not for
        innovating the "file manager" perhaps. There's unixtree on linux though:

        <http://www.unixtree.org/>

        Ah, memories. Oddly, I didn't ever get on with the significantly more
        popular midnight commander.

        --
        Best regards,
        Ed http://www.s5h.net/
      • thad_floryan
        ... That brings back memories: the West Coast Computer Faire (in San Francisco every year). Every year I was demo ing one or two of my 3B1 (aka UNIXPC aka
        Message 3 of 4 , May 29, 2013
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          --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, ed <ed@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Thu, May 23, 2013 at 11:29:46PM -0700, Joan Leach wrote:
          > > http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/23/microsoft_windows3_birthday/
          > > I wish I had known about Unix/Linux way back then, because I
          > > remember I hated the GUI and the mouse for the longest time. I
          > > still have my DOS floppies and it's only been a few years since I
          > > let my 486 go to a new home.
          > > I remember my A+ Class/Linux professor was surprised I knew about
          > > the piping symbol from DOS scripting I managed to learn a bit of.
          > > Joan in Reno
          >
          > The Register, source of inaccuracies, Windows 3.0 did not give the
          > world a file manager, it already existed in many forms,
          > particularly XTree:
          >
          > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XTree>

          That brings back memories: the West Coast Computer Faire (in San
          Francisco every year). Every year I was demo'ing one or two of my
          3B1 (aka UNIXPC aka PC7300) systems in the AT&T booth (since I ran
          the AT&T UNIX Users Group for the entirety of its existence (when
          AT&T abandoned its UNIX franchise)). During breaks I'd wander around
          and I do recall seeing XTree. The 3B1's file manager was extremely
          nice and it wouldn't be out of place on any of today's systems. The
          demos I run on the 3B1 included gcc, emacs, and a shoot'em'up space
          game all running simultaneously -- the OS was AT&T UNIX SVR3.51a

          For those curious about the 3B1:

          http://unixpc.org/

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3B1

          I used the 3B1 as a test bed for developing my tprobe program which
          was the only thing available to duplicate boot tapes even across a
          network -- I was concerned for the longevity of Sun-3 boot tapes -- as
          I've here before, and people are still using it today in 2013 as I
          read in the Usenet comp.sys.3b1 group.

          > Sadly, Windows absorbed many of the good features that XTree had and
          > that now ceases to exist, if there was a place for patent protection,
          > then XTree should have had it, for navigation and features, not for
          > innovating the "file manager" perhaps.

          Software patents (in the USA) are for the most part bogus due to the
          patent examiners' inabilities checking for prior art which means most
          software patents are a sham. I've seen software receive patents in
          the 1990s and 2000s for stuff I was using in the 1960s on computers.

          > There's unixtree on linux though:
          >
          > <http://www.unixtree.org/>

          Just a quick search on the 'Net finds these among 3 million other
          hits (using 'unix directory tree programs' as the search term):

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_%28Unix%29

          http://www.cs.unc.edu/~livingst/Xtree/

          http://www.centerkey.com/tree/

          http://code.activestate.com/recipes/217212-treepy-graphically-displays-the-directory-structur/

          I was using something else for directory tree graphical display back
          in the 1970s but I don't recall the exact program name -- there were
          so many all providing the same kind of directory presentation.


          > Ah, memories. Oddly, I didn't ever get on with the significantly
          > more popular midnight commander.

          Though the name sounded familiar, I had to look that one up:

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_Commander

          and it's a clone of Norton Commander and apparently very popular as
          you wrote assuming you're not talking about the 1983 game:

          http://www.giantbomb.com/midnight-commander/3030-33707/

          which also turned up in the same search along with several porno
          versions (DO NOT CLICK on the following two URLs):

          https://www.xplay.co/porn:midnight-commander-312188

          http://www.hotpornshow.com/watch/1696085/midnight-commander.html

          and the GNU Midnight Commander (safe to click on these four):

          http://www.gnu.org/software/mc/

          http://www.gnu.org/software/mc/images/mc-panelize-info.png

          http://www.midnight-commander.org/

          http://www.ibiblio.org/mc/FAQ

          :-)

          Thad
        • thad_floryan
          ... Hi Joan, You would have liked a 3B1 even though it was pricey. Though I ran the AT&T Silicon Valley UNIX Users Group I also assisted its sister DOS
          Message 4 of 4 , May 29, 2013
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            --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, Joan Leach <jleach728@...> wrote:
            >
            > http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/05/23/microsoft_windows3_birthday/
            > I wish I had known about Unix/Linux way back then, because I remember
            > I hated the GUI and the mouse for the longest time. I still have my
            > DOS floppies and it's only been a few years since I let my 486 go to a
            > new home.
            > I remember my A+ Class/Linux professor was surprised I knew about the
            > piping symbol from DOS scripting I managed to learn a bit of.

            Hi Joan,

            You would have liked a 3B1 even though it was pricey. Though I ran the
            AT&T Silicon Valley UNIX Users Group I also assisted its "sister" DOS
            group (yes, AT&T made PCs) because I couldn't turn down the lure of
            free dinners (AT&T was a very gracious host); this was back circa 1980s
            and 1990s. I was surprised (then) to learn DOS had piping -- it was
            obviously "borrowed" from UNIX.

            Nowadays I sort of do the opposite with Cygwin on my Windows boxes. I
            cited these screenshots here previously and you can see that Red Hat 9
            Vista and WinXP run xfig perfectly whereas CentOS 6 does not:

            http://thadlabs.com/PIX/xfig_test_RedHat_9_32-bit.jpg 217kB OK
            http://thadlabs.com/PIX/xfig_test_Vista-SP2_64-bit.jpg 219kB OK
            http://thadlabs.com/PIX/xfig_test_WinXP-SP3_32-bit.jpg 213kB OK
            http://thadlabs.com/PIX/xfig_test_CentOS_6.3_64-bit.jpg 205kB BAD

            Cygwin presents a Linux/UNIX environment under Windows without any
            requirement for virtualization; one can even "play" with the registry
            as you can see ("REGULUS" is one of my Vista systems):

            REGULUS bash 1/2380> ls /proc/registry
            HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT/ HKEY_CURRENT_USER/ HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/
            HKEY_USERS/ HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG/ HKEY_DYN_DATA/
            HKEY_PERFORMANCE_DATA/
            REGULUS bash 1/2380> ls /proc/registry/HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/
            COMPONENTS/ HARDWARE/ SAM/ SECURITY/ SOFTWARE/ SYSTEM/

            Note my bash alias for ls is: alias ls='ls -F' because I cannot
            stand or tolerate the directory listing color display default that
            most linux distros (including Cygwin) inflict on the user.

            BTW, in case you didn't know, the DOS [%SystemRoot%\system32\cmd.exe]
            program accepts Linux/UNIX style slashes "/" the same as "\"; to wit:

            Microsoft Windows [Version 6.0.6002]
            Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

            C:\Users\thad>cd Desktop/Computers/bash/Bash_scripting

            C:\Users\thad\Desktop\Computers\bash\Bash_scripting>dir
            Volume in drive C is COMPAQ
            Volume Serial Number is 58A9-2A64

            Directory of C:\Users\thad\Desktop\Computers\bash\Bash_scripting

            08/29/2008 04:21 PM <DIR> .
            08/29/2008 04:21 PM <DIR> ..
            08/29/2008 04:18 PM 41 0WHERE.txt
            08/29/2008 04:19 PM 1,002,317 abs-guide-5.4.tar.bz2
            08/29/2008 04:20 PM 2,464,319 abs-guide.pdf
            08/29/2008 04:20 PM 73,596 Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide.pdf

            4 File(s) 3,540,273 bytes
            2 Dir(s) 74,345,340,928 bytes free

            Another not-well-known tip: to do a screen capture as I just did for
            the above lines, right-click the [C:\] icon at the top left corner of
            the DOS window and choose "Edit -> Select All", then click again and
            choose "Copy" which can then be pasted anywhere (e.g., an editor, etc)

            Thad
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