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Re: [linux] OT: My testing RVS4000 VPN firewall security router just arrived

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  • Doug
    ... Whyizzit that practically every router you see is only 4 ports? With 3 computers and 2 printers, I would obviously be out of ports. I am actually using a
    Message 1 of 4 , May 14, 2013
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      On 05/14/2013 06:13 PM, Thad Floryan wrote:
      >
      > I previously wrote:
      >
      > " I have been "educating" folks on the Usenet ba.internet group
      > " about the Cisco RVS4000 and how it's the best bargain so far in
      > " the 21st Century from Newegg. More about that later though I
      > " might just put up a web page since I'm really surprised no one
      > " here has even asked about it though it has a built-in managed
      > " 4-port LAN switch, jumbo frames, 800Mbps WAN <-> LAN throughput
      > " with the firewall and IPS enabled (as I have it set) -- it's the
      > " best $55 I've ever spent for something that can also do IPv4 <=>
      > " IPv6, NAT, VLANs and VPN. I am seriously thinking of buying 10+
      > " more from Newegg @ $55 each and selling them for $550 each once
      > " Newegg's stock is depleted. Cisco's docs blow, as usual, and
      > " I'll make additional $$$ consulting others how to configure the
      > " gigabit router though I will answer questions for free here in
      > " the Linux group. :-)
      >
      > Budget constraints prevented me buying 10 more but I did buy one more
      > for backup and testing purposes and it just arrived a few minutes ago.
      >
      > "Backup" is in case something happens to the one that's presently in
      > service.
      >
      > "Testing" is so I can run massive nmap and other tests against the
      > WAN port along with LAN<=>LAN and LAN<=>WAN speed tests without
      > affecting my Internet connection. Everything so far (since April 29)
      > with the first RVS4000 has been working fine and I'm now achieving
      > 3.5MB/S downloads (note that's mega BYTES per second).
      >
      > For those who may have forgotten, the Cisco RVS4000 is a Gigabit
      > VPN/Security/Firewall/Router box with a managed GiGE 4-port switch
      > all for the princely sum of US$55. Yes, that's fifty-five dollars.
      >
      > It replaces my 10-year old SonicWALL TZ170 which was limited to just
      > 100Mbps on its WAN, DMZ and LAN ports and was configured thusly:
      >
      > http://thadlabs.com/PIX/ThadLABS_network_demarc.jpg 172kB
      >
      > http://thadlabs.com/FILES/ThadLABS_network_demarc.txt 1.53kB
      >
      > As I previously wrote, web searches reveal a lot of people having
      > problems with this device. As I also wrote, those people are idiots
      > who don't know squat about computers and networking and cannot even
      > comprehend the OSI layers and how to configure a real router. I need
      > to add my "Feedback" to Newegg's page because another idiot is still
      > badmouthing the product there:
      >
      > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833150135
      >
      > To be fair, Cisco documentation both sucks and blows. Illustrations
      > featuring screenshots in the manual are unreadable. The phrase
      > "Jumbo Packets" doesn't appear in any of the data sheets, marketing
      > brochures, or the manual and release notes. Anyone who truly knows
      > networking knows that Ethernet frame size is managed in OSI Layer 2
      > and the menu system of the RVS4000 clearly has:
      >
      > L2 Switch -> Port Settings
      >
      > where such can be set. Too many (i.e., 99.9%) of the bad reviews
      > of the product are due to people NOT READING the release notes and
      > not updating to the latest firmware (July 2012) and NOT KNOWING what
      > they're doing -- i.e., stupidos.
      >
      > Two quickie screenshots I did of my first RVS4000 are here (noting I
      > used my Win98 ThinkPAD laptop for initial config since it has so many
      > tools for networking installed and I've been using it since 1998):
      >
      > http://thadlabs.com/PIX/Cisco_RVS4000_summary.jpg 121kB
      >
      > http://thadlabs.com/PIX/Cisco_RVS4000_LAN_setup.jpg 118kB
      >
      > Yes, the RVS4000 is EOL'd but it's still being supported by Cisco and
      > the $55 price is a steal compared to what else is "out there" much of
      > which are mere toys.
      >
      > The only semi-affordable (for me) alternate replacement products were
      > two SonicWALL (now Dell) appliances models TZ205 and TZ215:
      >
      > Datasheet (8 pages. 1.7MB):
      >
      > http://www.sonicwall.com/app/projects/file_downloader/document_lib.php?t=DS&id=387
      >
      > Newegg's SonicWALL product pages
      >
      > TZ205 (US$463):
      >
      > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833339179
      >
      > TZ215 (US$650):
      >
      > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833339194
      >
      > and there would still be licensing "issues" with the SonicWALLs which
      > is the only thing I dislike about the SonicWALL products noting I've
      > installed 100s at client/employer sites since the mid-1990s.
      >
      > Since there appears to be no interest in this group about routers and
      > similar given the total lack of response to far, I won't write any more
      > about this unless someone asks question(s) in this thread. I'll also
      > put up a web page about the RVS4000 after I complete my testing to
      > embarrass all the idiots who've been badmouthing the product.
      >
      > Thad
      >

      Whyizzit that practically every router you see is only 4 ports? With 3
      computers
      and 2 printers, I would obviously be out of ports. I am actually using a
      D-Link
      8-port router--it's about the only affordable one in existence. But
      using a 4-port
      and a switch, in addition to the cable modem, starts to be a kluge!

      --doug

      --
      Blessed are the peacemakers..for they shall be shot at from both sides. --A.M.Greeley



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • thad_floryan
      ... Probably due to the hardware modules used; the Cisco RVS4000 uses this managed switch module: https://www.vitesse.com/products/product.php?number=VSC7385
      Message 2 of 4 , May 14, 2013
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        --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, Doug <dmcgarrett@...> wrote:
        > [ ... 108 lines trimmed ...
        > Doug, Please learn how to trim before replying; these may help:
        > http://linux.sgms-centre.com/misc/netiquette.php
        > http://howto-pages.org/posting_style
        > ]
        >
        > Whyizzit that practically every router you see is only 4 ports?

        Probably due to the hardware modules used; the Cisco RVS4000 uses this
        managed switch module:

        https://www.vitesse.com/products/product.php?number=VSC7385

        which is THE reason the Cisco product caught my attention and I bought
        it.

        > With 3 computers and 2 printers, I would obviously be out of ports.
        > I am actually using a D-Link 8-port router -- it's about the only
        > affordable one in existence. But using a 4-port and a switch, in
        > addition to the cable modem, starts to be a kluge!

        How so a "kluge"?

        I have on my LAN some 30+ computers, Ethernet-to-RS-232 converters,
        3 printers, an Ethernet-to-USB hub, 2 LAN cams, and some other stuff.

        The RVS4000 has 4 LAN ports which I have setup per:

        port 1: to a ZyXEL GS1100-16 16-port gigabit switch
        port 2: to a ZyXEL GS1100-16 16-port gigabit switch
        port 3: to a D-Link DGS2208 8-port gigabit switch
        port 4: set as a DMZ to a D-Link DIR-655 gigabit WiFi router

        The WAN port goes to a Motorola SB6121 DOCSIS 3.0 gigabit cable modem.

        It all works fine and I don't see any of that as a "kluge" -- what
        would you do with 8 computers and 2 printers on your LAN? You'd need
        a switch(es) like everyone else on the planet uses from SOHO/SMB to
        Fortune 500 companies to entire governments' networks.

        Thad
      • thad_floryan
        ... Here s one of my network setups I did for Sigaba noting this was the last re-configuration after downsizing due to product changes (and the company went
        Message 3 of 4 , May 14, 2013
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          --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, "thad_floryan" <thad@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, Doug <dmcgarrett@> wrote:
          > > [...]
          > > Whyizzit that practically every router you see is only 4 ports?
          > [...]
          > Probably due to the hardware modules used; the Cisco RVS4000 uses
          > this managed switch module:
          >
          > https://www.vitesse.com/products/product.php?number=VSC7385
          > [...]

          Here's one of my network setups I did for Sigaba noting this was the
          last re-configuration after downsizing due to product changes (and the
          company went belly-up shortly afterwards) -- the original config was
          twice the size and redundantly duplicated across the USA in Virginia:

          http://thadlabs.com/FILES/Thad_San_Jose_colo_2006.07.10.pdf 28kB

          Note the Cisco router has 2 WAN ports and one LAN port which feeds a
          PIX firewall which feeds a Foundry Networks switch and load balancer.

          The computer vendors are listed at the bottom left corner of each box
          with VA (VA Linux), Sun, and Dell. VA Linux was here in Mountain View
          and later became Geeknet noting it was also the largest vendor of
          pre-installed Linux systems and it was one of the "Linux Big Three"
          along with Linuxcare and Red Hat:

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geeknet

          When Sigaba (in San Mateo CA) went belly-up I walked across the court
          yard and joined Levanta (formerly Linuxcare) and I was their last IT
          guy until they went belly-up thanks to Novell and Microsoft on March
          31, 2008, when I received a 6:30am phone call to come in and close
          down the company -- that was really disruptive for a lot of customers
          including Los Angeles' MTA and a number of universities worldwide due
          to the nature of the products: self-fixing/-repairing data centers.

          See this Wikipedia page for more info showing the progression from
          Linuxcare to Levanta and the product change to auto-managed data
          centers (which I thought was an excellent product):

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levanta

          Thad
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