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High Speed Internet Configuration

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  • Greg
    Hi everyone, I am soon (hopefully) going to graduate beyond dial-up internet service. However, even though I am entering my fourth year as a Nix-er; I still
    Message 1 of 6 , May 31 9:36 AM
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      Hi everyone,

      I am soon (hopefully) going to graduate beyond dial-up
      internet service. However, even though I am entering my
      fourth year as a Nix-er; I still am a total newbie when
      it comes to high-speed internet configuration. I am such
      a newbie, that I do not even know how to ask the questions
      properly, either here, or in "googling". But, here goes...


      Do I use "netconfig" (running Slack 9.1) to configure
      a high speed connection? Even though I am setting up
      only one computer, to connect to an internet network
      that exists totally outside of my "realm", is it still
      considered to be "networking"?


      The "netconfig" utility seems pretty straightforward;
      but how do I determine such things as the hostname,
      IP address, mask, etc....when it is not *my* internet
      service. Does the ISP determine these things? And
      more so...will they readily *share* this info with
      me? (As opposed to just assuming I am a user of
      "cookie-cutter" sameness Windows...)


      I assume that one can always just load a Knoppix CD,
      once a high-speed internet account is set up, and copy
      the Knoppix settings....but that does not really
      *teach* how it is done...


      As I said, even though there is a ton of information
      available about all of this, including the group FAQ;
      I am still unsure as to exactly *what* I need to be
      reading. Any and all tips will be greatly appreciated.

      :o)

      --

      Greg Heilers
      Registered Linux user #328317 - SlackWare 9.1
    • Scott
      ... Ironically enough, broadband ~can~ be easier to setup than dialup. It will depend upon what sort of high speed access you will have. For example, with
      Message 2 of 6 , May 31 10:14 AM
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        On Mon, May 31, 2004 at 04:36:57PM +0000, Greg wrote:
        > Hi everyone,
        >
        > I am soon (hopefully) going to graduate beyond dial-up
        > internet service. However, even though I am entering my
        > fourth year as a Nix-er; I still am a total newbie when
        > it comes to high-speed internet configuration. I am such
        > a newbie, that I do not even know how to ask the questions
        > properly, either here, or in "googling". But, here goes...
        >
        >
        > Do I use "netconfig" (running Slack 9.1) to configure
        > a high speed connection? Even though I am setting up
        > only one computer, to connect to an internet network
        > that exists totally outside of my "realm", is it still
        > considered to be "networking"?

        Ironically enough, broadband ~can~ be easier to setup than dialup. It
        will depend upon what sort of high speed access you will have. For
        example, with RoadRunner and other cable providers, it's simply a matter
        of connecting the ethernet card to the modem--with the Verizon pppOE
        stuff, I think it's a bit more complex (haven't used that, so I don't
        know).

        >
        >
        > The "netconfig" utility seems pretty straightforward;
        > but how do I determine such things as the hostname,
        > IP address, mask, etc....when it is not *my* internet
        > service. Does the ISP determine these things? And
        > more so...will they readily *share* this info with
        > me? (As opposed to just assuming I am a user of
        > "cookie-cutter" sameness Windows...)

        In most cases, the ISP provided modem uses DHCP which will decide
        everything but the hostname. (The hostname is more or less irrelevant
        in this case.)
        >
        >
        >
        > As I said, even though there is a ton of information
        > available about all of this, including the group FAQ;
        > I am still unsure as to exactly *what* I need to be
        > reading. Any and all tips will be greatly appreciated.

        Heh--there are actually various howtos at tldp (The Linux Documentation
        Project) but unfortunately, they often quickly become dated, as ISPs
        change their procedures. In this case, I think the question is,
        assuming that only one computer is the issue, is who will the new ISP
        be--is it cable or DSL, and if DSL, will it be using pppOe? (If so,
        that isn't covered in the list faq.) If it's just cable, see above--the
        modem ~should~ give the ethernet card an address.


        --

        Scott

        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Cordelia: What's her saga?
        Xander: She's freaking.
        Cordelia: About what?
        Xander: The mayor is gonna kill us all during graduation.
        Cordelia: Oh. Are you gonna go to 5th period?
      • Greg
        ... Yes...RoadRunner was what I was considering. ... That is where most of my confusion is centered. Distros such as RedHat and Mandrake will auto-magically
        Message 3 of 6 , May 31 10:21 AM
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          --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@d...> wrote:
          > On Mon, May 31, 2004 at 04:36:57PM +0000, Greg wrote:
          > > Hi everyone,
          > >
          > > I am soon (hopefully) going to graduate beyond dial-up
          > > internet service. However, even though I am entering my
          > > fourth year as a Nix-er; I still am a total newbie when
          > > it comes to high-speed internet configuration. I am such
          > > a newbie, that I do not even know how to ask the questions
          > > properly, either here, or in "googling". But, here goes...
          > >
          > >
          > > Do I use "netconfig" (running Slack 9.1) to configure
          > > a high speed connection? Even though I am setting up
          > > only one computer, to connect to an internet network
          > > that exists totally outside of my "realm", is it still
          > > considered to be "networking"?
          >
          > Ironically enough, broadband ~can~ be easier to setup than dialup. It
          > will depend upon what sort of high speed access you will have. For
          > example, with RoadRunner and other cable providers, it's simply a matter
          > of connecting the ethernet card to the modem--with the Verizon pppOE
          > stuff, I think it's a bit more complex (haven't used that, so I don't
          > know).


          Yes...RoadRunner was what I was considering.


          > >
          > >
          > > The "netconfig" utility seems pretty straightforward;
          > > but how do I determine such things as the hostname,
          > > IP address, mask, etc....when it is not *my* internet
          > > service. Does the ISP determine these things? And
          > > more so...will they readily *share* this info with
          > > me? (As opposed to just assuming I am a user of
          > > "cookie-cutter" sameness Windows...)
          >
          > In most cases, the ISP provided modem uses DHCP which will decide
          > everything but the hostname. (The hostname is more or less irrelevant
          > in this case.)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > As I said, even though there is a ton of information
          > > available about all of this, including the group FAQ;
          > > I am still unsure as to exactly *what* I need to be
          > > reading. Any and all tips will be greatly appreciated.
          >
          > Heh--there are actually various howtos at tldp (The Linux Documentation
          > Project) but unfortunately, they often quickly become dated, as ISPs
          > change their procedures. In this case, I think the question is,
          > assuming that only one computer is the issue, is who will the new ISP
          > be--is it cable or DSL, and if DSL, will it be using pppOe? (If so,
          > that isn't covered in the list faq.) If it's just cable, see above--the
          > modem ~should~ give the ethernet card an address.
          >


          That is where most of my confusion is centered. Distros such as
          RedHat and Mandrake will "auto-magically" configure the connection
          on install. Knoppox will do it on boot. Is this because the cable
          modem just automatically "works"? Will it be also be so in Slack?


          > --
          >
          > Scott
          >
          > PGP keyID EB3467D6
          > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
          > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
          >
          > Cordelia: What's her saga?
          > Xander: She's freaking.
          > Cordelia: About what?
          > Xander: The mayor is gonna kill us all during graduation.
          > Cordelia: Oh. Are you gonna go to 5th period?
        • Mike Dillinger
          ... From: Greg Date: Monday, May 31, 2004 at 10:21AM PDT G That is where most of my confusion is centered. Distros such as G RedHat
          Message 4 of 6 , May 31 10:40 AM
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            --- Original Message
            From: Greg <linux@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Monday, May 31, 2004 at 10:21AM PDT

            G> That is where most of my confusion is centered. Distros such as
            G> RedHat and Mandrake will "auto-magically" configure the connection
            G> on install. Knoppox will do it on boot. Is this because the cable
            G> modem just automatically "works"? Will it be also be so in Slack?

            Are you getting RoadRunner residential (dynamic IP) or business (static
            IP)?

            I'm not familiar with Slackware personally (I've used RedHat and now
            Debian), but it is very easy to set up. I did a quick Google search and
            found this link for Slackware:
            http://www.slackware.com/book/index.php?source=x1100.html
            Hopefully it's for version 9. I just perused it quickly and did not see
            any mention of version.

            -MikeD
          • Scott
            ... At one point, you had to have an MS or MAC install handy, to put in some software, but I believe that is no longer the case. ... With Slack, you will want
            Message 5 of 6 , May 31 10:48 AM
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              On Mon, May 31, 2004 at 05:21:00PM +0000, Greg wrote:
              > --- In linux@yahoogroups.com, Scott <scottro@d...> wrote:
              > > On Mon, May 31, 2004 at 04:36:57PM +0000, Greg wrote:
              > > > Hi everyone,
              > > >
              >
              > Yes...RoadRunner was what I was considering.

              At one point, you had to have an MS or MAC install handy, to put in
              some software, but I believe that is no longer the case.


              >
              >
              >
              > That is where most of my confusion is centered. Distros such as
              > RedHat and Mandrake will "auto-magically" configure the connection
              > on install. Knoppox will do it on boot. Is this because the cable
              > modem just automatically "works"? Will it be also be so in Slack?

              With Slack, you will want to configure your ethernet card to use DHCP.
              The modem will then give it an address.

              One point--this is assuming it is only one computer. If there is more
              than one computer using the modem, and you have to change which cable
              goes into the modem, you should first turn off the computer using the
              modem, unplug the modem, plug the second computer into the modem, turn
              the modem back on and then turn on the computer--the RR modems bind to a
              MAC address, and have to know that a particular address is released.

              As long as Slackware recognizes your network card, you should be fine.

              I've actually used a Linksys router for years, which simply makes it
              easy, but I have a few computers--in that case, the modem connects to
              the router, and, depending upon the router, either a hub (or switch) or
              various computers go into the router--while my one port router cost
              over $100 a few years ago, the 4 port ones are now about $65 dollars, so
              if you only have, say, two computers, that's the easiest solution.


              --

              Scott

              PGP keyID EB3467D6
              ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
              gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

              Buffy: I don't play well with others.
            • James Drabb
              ... In another post you mention roadrunner. I have used RR for about 5 years in two different locations. RR uses DHCP, so it is _very_ easy to setup with
              Message 6 of 6 , May 31 3:50 PM
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                Greg wrote:
                > Hi everyone,
                >
                > I am soon (hopefully) going to graduate beyond dial-up
                > internet service. However, even though I am entering my
                > fourth year as a Nix-er; I still am a total newbie when
                > it comes to high-speed internet configuration. I am such
                > a newbie, that I do not even know how to ask the questions
                > properly, either here, or in "googling". But, here goes...
                >
                >
                > Do I use "netconfig" (running Slack 9.1) to configure
                > a high speed connection? Even though I am setting up
                > only one computer, to connect to an internet network
                > that exists totally outside of my "realm", is it still
                > considered to be "networking"?
                >
                >
                > The "netconfig" utility seems pretty straightforward;
                > but how do I determine such things as the hostname,
                > IP address, mask, etc....when it is not *my* internet
                > service. Does the ISP determine these things? And
                > more so...will they readily *share* this info with
                > me? (As opposed to just assuming I am a user of
                > "cookie-cutter" sameness Windows...)
                >
                >
                > I assume that one can always just load a Knoppix CD,
                > once a high-speed internet account is set up, and copy
                > the Knoppix settings....but that does not really
                > *teach* how it is done...
                >
                >
                > As I said, even though there is a ton of information
                > available about all of this, including the group FAQ;
                > I am still unsure as to exactly *what* I need to be
                > reading. Any and all tips will be greatly appreciated.
                >
                > :o)
                >

                In another post you mention roadrunner. I have used RR for about 5
                years in two different locations. RR uses DHCP, so it is _very_ easy to
                setup with Linux (or windows). In most distros there will be an option
                to use DHCP, just select this and your set. For the hostname, RR does
                not set this via DHCP, so just make up one. For example, my computers
                are named after my children, Keelie and Kaleb. Those names are only
                valid for my local network, the same for the name(s) you pick for your
                computer(s) when you switch to RR.

                For my network, I have a cable/dsl router that I connect to RR. This
                gets the DHCP assigned IP and then I set all my boxes to be on
                192.168.1.x/255.255.255.0 and they can all use the network through the
                router. I would recemmend this since you will be _always_ connected to
                the net with RR and you will be far greater target then with dial-up.
                In the future you could use Linux to do the routing if you want, though
                it is not neccesary with a cable/dsl router.

                Jim Drabb
                --
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
                He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without
                lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light
                without darkening me. -- Thomas Jefferson; 1813
                =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
                James Drabb JR
                Senior Programmer
                Davenport, FL USA
                http://tinyurl.com/2hwrn - Public Key
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