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reiser

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  • psyfybre
    Hello linux, whats the general oppinion of reiserfs as opposed to ext2/3. currently i am using ext3 because its the latest but i was wondering how does
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 2002
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      Hello linux,

      whats the general oppinion of reiserfs as opposed to ext2/3.
      currently i am using ext3 because its the latest but i was wondering
      how does reiser compare. i have read that you can have more than one
      file per block, does this create an overhead via the means of a more
      complex fat table?

      --
      Best regards,
      psyfybre
    • Scott Robbins
      ... I m using Reiser on most things, and find it faster than ext3. The stability issues seem to have been fixed--FWIW Gentoo seems to recommend it in their
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2002
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        On Sun, Dec 01, 2002 at 06:49:18PM +0000, psyfybre wrote:
        > Hello linux,
        >
        > whats the general oppinion of reiserfs as opposed to ext2/3.
        > currently i am using ext3 because its the latest but i was wondering
        > how does reiser compare. i have read that you can have more than one
        > file per block, does this create an overhead via the means of a more
        > complex fat table?

        I'm using Reiser on most things, and find it faster than ext3. The
        stability issues seem to have been fixed--FWIW Gentoo seems to recommend
        it in their install docs.

        I do keep an ext3 partition as recent Linux kernels can't mount
        FreeBSD--there's an ugly kernel hack that will fix it, but I'm too lazy.
        Conversely, FreeBSD can't yet mount reiser, so I need the ext3 partition
        to transfer files on the same box--otherwise, I have to copy it to
        another box, then copy it back. :)

        I see no reason not to use it on a workstation. I don't know how it's
        done being heavily stressed on a server.
        >

        HTH
        >

        --

        Scott Robbins

        PGP keyID EB3467D6
        ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
        gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6

        Xander: We're right behind you, only further back.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • art_perry
        Reiserfs is a very sophisticated filesystem which includes journaling, which is a very hot item in today s high data-integrity demanding environments. Ext2
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 3, 2002
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          Reiserfs is a very sophisticated filesystem which includes
          journaling, which is a very hot item in today's high data-integrity
          demanding environments.
          Ext2 attributes are not supported yet in reiserfs, nor is bad-block
          ckecking and tracking, as far as I know.
          Other than those small downfalls, reiserfs gives you a superior
          filesystem, which is quite robust in design.
          By using balanced-tree algorithms, reiserfs can give great speed as
          well as efficient block-handling on your device. There also is
          virtually no limit to files and directories, as limits are found in
          other filesystems.
          Try putting 2.5 million files in a single directory in ext2!
          I gurarantee you will have a problem doing that with NTFS!

          FAT tables are not used in reiserfs, nor ext2/3. The filesystem
          uses "inodes" and "superblocks", as most unix type filesystems do.

          Another thing to watch for is reiserfs 4.
          In my opinion, (an insider tip for all you Linux gurus out there:)
          here looks like an awesome oppertunity to actually have relational
          database hooks in the filesystem itself with simple middleware
          applications.
          Remember, some of the best databases we have today which are so
          neglected, are filesystems! They just are indexing databases vs
          relational databases, which we all are familiar with such as Oracle
          and mySQL.

          Check out http://www.namesys.com for more information about reiserfs.



          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Have a Linux problem?
          Maybe I can help!
          - Arthur Perry - Sair/Linux GNU certified professional
          Over 6 years of Linux experience and more than that in computer
          programming!
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          My site http://www.perryconsulting.net is under construction, but
          will be available soon.
          Please visit for Linux info and source of information.
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~







          --- In linux@y..., Scott Robbins <scottro@d...> wrote:
          > On Sun, Dec 01, 2002 at 06:49:18PM +0000, psyfybre wrote:
          > > Hello linux,
          > >
          > > whats the general oppinion of reiserfs as opposed to
          ext2/3.
          > > currently i am using ext3 because its the latest but i was
          wondering
          > > how does reiser compare. i have read that you can have more
          than one
          > > file per block, does this create an overhead via the means of a
          more
          > > complex fat table?
          >
          > I'm using Reiser on most things, and find it faster than ext3. The
          > stability issues seem to have been fixed--FWIW Gentoo seems to
          recommend
          > it in their install docs.
          >
          > I do keep an ext3 partition as recent Linux kernels can't mount
          > FreeBSD--there's an ugly kernel hack that will fix it, but I'm too
          lazy.
          > Conversely, FreeBSD can't yet mount reiser, so I need the ext3
          partition
          > to transfer files on the same box--otherwise, I have to copy it to
          > another box, then copy it back. :)
          >
          > I see no reason not to use it on a workstation. I don't know how
          it's
          > done being heavily stressed on a server.
          > >
          >
          > HTH
          > >
          >
          > --
          >
          > Scott Robbins
          >
          > PGP keyID EB3467D6
          > ( 1B48 077D 66F6 9DB0 FDC2 A409 FA54 D575 EB34 67D6 )
          > gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-keys EB3467D6
          >
          > Xander: We're right behind you, only further back.
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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