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RedHat 7.2 and Windows 2K

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  • Nelson Ricciardi
    Hi. I m new to Linux. Been using it fot less the 6 month. My computer has REdhat 7.2 Today I decided to use Redhat network and accept the system upgrades.
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
      Hi.

      I'm new to Linux. Been using it fot less the 6 month. My computer has REdhat 7.2

      Today I decided to use Redhat network and accept the system upgrades. Among them was the kernel upgrade.

      Everything went fine but when I restarted the machine, the boot manager was showing 3 different options.

      1 - Linux (new kernel)
      2 - Linux (old kernel)
      3 - Windows 2k

      Does it mean that I have two differente Linux on my computer?

      If so, how can I get ride of the old one?

      I was expecting the upgrade to overwrite the old kernel, and not to create a "new linux".

      Can someone help me?

      Thanks

      Nelson


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • tim fairchild
      On Friday 02 November 2001 14:04, Nelson Ricciardi wrote: Hi. I m new to Linux. Been using it fot less the 6 month. My computer has REdhat 7.2
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
        On Friday 02 November 2001 14:04, Nelson Ricciardi wrote:
        > Hi.
        >
        > I'm new to Linux. Been using it fot less the 6 month. My computer has
        > REdhat 7.2
        >
        > Today I decided to use Redhat network and accept the system upgrades. Among
        > them was the kernel upgrade.
        >
        > Everything went fine but when I restarted the machine, the boot manager was
        > showing 3 different options.
        >
        > 1 - Linux (new kernel)
        > 2 - Linux (old kernel)
        > 3 - Windows 2k
        >
        > Does it mean that I have two differente Linux on my computer?

        No, just the one 'linux'. You have a new kernel, that's all. When you upgrade
        a kernel it keeps a copy of the old one 'just in case'. If the new kernel
        doesn't work or has a bug, you can boot the old one.

        You don't really need to get rid of it.

        tim

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      • Nelson Ricciardi
        ... Hi Thanks Satish and Tim for the replies. What will happen when I make a new upgrade? Will I have 3 kernels? How much disk space does a kernel waste? I m
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 1, 2001
          On Friday 02 November 2001 03:05, tim fairchild wrote:

          > > Does it mean that I have two differente Linux on my computer?
          >
          > No, just the one 'linux'. You have a new kernel, that's all. When you
          > upgrade a kernel it keeps a copy of the old one 'just in case'. If the new
          > kernel doesn't work or has a bug, you can boot the old one.
          >
          > You don't really need to get rid of it.
          >
          > tim

          Hi
          Thanks Satish and Tim for the replies.
          What will happen when I make a new upgrade? Will I have 3 kernels?
          How much disk space does a kernel waste?

          I'm fascinated. Linux on my laptop is so fast it's amazing.
        • Jason Flatt
          ... Red Hat 7.1 with 3 kernels due to upgrades: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/hdb1 23M 8.1M 13M 38% /boot
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 2, 2001
            On Thursday 01 November 2001 09:31 pm, Nelson Ricciardi wrote:
            > On Friday 02 November 2001 03:05, tim fairchild wrote:
            > > > Does it mean that I have two differente Linux on my computer?
            > >
            > > No, just the one 'linux'. You have a new kernel, that's all. When you
            > > upgrade a kernel it keeps a copy of the old one 'just in case'. If the
            > > new kernel doesn't work or has a bug, you can boot the old one.
            > >
            > > You don't really need to get rid of it.
            > >
            > > tim
            >
            > Hi
            > Thanks Satish and Tim for the replies.
            > What will happen when I make a new upgrade? Will I have 3 kernels?
            > How much disk space does a kernel waste?


            Red Hat 7.1 with 3 kernels due to upgrades:
            Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
            /dev/hdb1 23M 8.1M 13M 38% /boot


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