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Re: [linux-dell-laptops] Connecting to the outside world

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  • Sunny Dubey
    ... I dunno .. use wvdial to use a modem to connect to the world ... or iconfig and route to use a network interface ... you sound like you just took a class
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 12, 2001
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      On Wednesday 12 September 2001 10:42 pm, you wrote:
      > So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets
      > his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation)
      > setup so that he can connect to the outside world?
      >
      I dunno .. use wvdial to use a modem to connect to the world ... or iconfig
      and route to use a network interface

      > It seems that with "medium security" the only thing one
      > can do is send emails in the localhost, connect via PPP
      > to the internet but then ONLY be able to ping the IP
      > number of the remote PPP host (and that is it), so no
      > SMTP connections to the outside, no UUCP over TCP, no
      > web browsing, etc. I really don't have time to spend
      > reading IPTABLES/IPCHAINS, I have been without mail for
      > nearly a week.
      you sound like you just took a class on Microsoft security
      there is no such thing as "medium" security.
      everyone does their own securing for whatever reason they have. For example,
      I run oidentd binded to port 113 running as the nobody group, and ssh binded
      a lovely port above 1024 running as nobody either. Those are the only two
      ports I have open to the world. I run kernel 2.2.19 with ipchains, connected
      to the net on a cable modem. Some people I know have lots of ports open, and
      run kernel 2.4.x with iptables. Go to linuxdoc.org and RTFM a little.

      >
      > If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
      > please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
      > thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
      > to 6.2+.
      you should really read a little, any distro can be secured without
      reinstalling the entire system.

      Sunny Dubey
    • degt@hotmail.com
      So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation) setup so that he can connect to the
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 12, 2001
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        So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets
        his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation)
        setup so that he can connect to the outside world?

        It seems that with "medium security" the only thing one
        can do is send emails in the localhost, connect via PPP
        to the internet but then ONLY be able to ping the IP
        number of the remote PPP host (and that is it), so no
        SMTP connections to the outside, no UUCP over TCP, no
        web browsing, etc. I really don't have time to spend
        reading IPTABLES/IPCHAINS, I have been without mail for
        nearly a week.

        If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
        please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
        thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
        to 6.2+.
      • Rudolf Usselmann
        ... To the best of my knowledge it doesn t matter how you setup security for outgoing connections. The firewall feature and security selection defines how
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 12, 2001
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          On Thursday 13 September 2001 09:42, you wrote:
          > So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets
          > his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation)
          > setup so that he can connect to the outside world?
          >
          > It seems that with "medium security" the only thing one
          > can do is send emails in the localhost, connect via PPP
          > to the internet but then ONLY be able to ping the IP
          > number of the remote PPP host (and that is it), so no
          > SMTP connections to the outside, no UUCP over TCP, no
          > web browsing, etc. I really don't have time to spend
          > reading IPTABLES/IPCHAINS, I have been without mail for
          > nearly a week.
          >
          > If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
          > please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
          > thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
          > to 6.2+.

          To the best of my knowledge it doesn't matter how you setup
          security for outgoing connections. The firewall feature and
          security selection defines how other systems from the outside
          can reach your laptop. For example, I had to install xinetd (from
          the RH 7.1 CD) so that I can rlogin to my system - I also selected
          medium security. However I had no problem reaching my local
          network at all. I ran netconf, setup the IP and dns, etc. and I
          was up and running for outgoing connections. I did not try PPP
          or SMTP, but web browsing and rlogin to other systems works
          out of the box.

          Anyway, to answer your question: review the setup of your dial-up
          configuration. I bet you that is where the problem lies. Make sure
          you have dns server setup properly and you get an IP address
          (either through DHCP or manual entry). I think there is no way
          around reading the documentation, as each problem is unique.
          You might be able to find an easy answer in the How-To's ...

          Also, if you operate in dual mode (local network connection and
          PPP) you probably need to switch your network profiles between
          the two configuration. I'm not quite sure how this works under linux
          without rerunning netconf each time ...

          Good Luck,
          rudi
        • jsc3@havoc.gtf.org
          ... I think your problem is NOT with the firewall. The firewall does not restrict outbound connections as far as I know. You may need to look for the answer
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 13, 2001
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            > On Wednesday 12 September 2001 10:42 pm, you wrote:
            > > So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets
            > > his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation)
            > > setup so that he can connect to the outside world?
            > >
            > I dunno .. use wvdial to use a modem to connect to the world ... or iconfig
            > and route to use a network interface
            >
            > > It seems that with "medium security" the only thing one
            > > can do is send emails in the localhost, connect via PPP
            > > to the internet but then ONLY be able to ping the IP
            > > number of the remote PPP host (and that is it), so no
            > > SMTP connections to the outside, no UUCP over TCP, no
            > > web browsing, etc. I really don't have time to spend
            > > reading IPTABLES/IPCHAINS, I have been without mail for
            > > nearly a week.

            I think your problem is NOT with the firewall. The firewall
            does not restrict outbound connections as far as I know. You
            may need to look for the answer to your problem elsewhere, probably
            in the network configuration itself.

            > you sound like you just took a class on Microsoft security

            No need to be insulting, particularly when in this case it is
            you yourself who are wrong (see my response to the next statement).

            > there is no such thing as "medium" security.

            Actually, there is, at least when you install "Redhat 7.X". When you
            do the graphical installation (I haven't done the text install for
            either 7.0 or 7.1) you are asked to choose from one of three security
            settings - none, medium and high, if I recall. There is also an option
            with medium and high security to specify additional ports that will
            remain open.

            > everyone does their own securing for whatever reason they have. For example,
            > I run oidentd binded to port 113 running as the nobody group, and ssh binded
            > a lovely port above 1024 running as nobody either. Those are the only two
            > ports I have open to the world. I run kernel 2.2.19 with ipchains, connected
            > to the net on a cable modem. Some people I know have lots of ports open, and
            > run kernel 2.4.x with iptables. Go to linuxdoc.org and RTFM a little.

            This is all reasonable. I have a similar setup, though I run ssh on the
            standard port (22). Be advised that if you have Redhat 7.0 (haven't
            scanned my new 7.1 system yet), and you scan it with nmap/nessus, you
            will probably see LOTS of ports opened, even if you closed most of them
            yourself. This is because portsentry is listening on those ports and
            logging scans (took me a couple of minutes to figure out what is going
            on). I highly recommend nmap, nessus, snort and ethereal. nmap is a
            "basic" scanner. nessus is a full-featured scanner that also checks
            for common exploits. snort is an intrusion detection system, better
            than portsentry in many ways. ethereal is a network sniffer. In my
            opinion, everybody should have at least nmap to check out there own
            system after installation, and ethereal for troubleshooting network
            problems (ethereal is MUCH easier to use than tcpdump).

            > > If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
            > > please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
            > > thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
            > > to 6.2+.

            I don't think this will help (it might) as I think the problem is
            your network configuration, not the firewall software.

            > you should really read a little, any distro can be secured without
            > reinstalling the entire system.

            I don't think he is talking about reinstalling to gain security,
            he is thinking about reinstalling to get rid of the security. This
            is a mistake in my opinion, and I do agree that with a little
            reading he can resolve his problem in the same time as it would
            take to reinstall, and he would learn something. "reinstall the
            OS" is definitely a Microsoft-like way of fixing the problem.

            --
            John Cronin
            mailto: `echo NjsOc3@... | sed 's/[NOSPAM]//g'`
          • J. Orrell
            Just to add my own experience. I selected a high (RH 7.1) firewall because I don t know enough to do any of my own configuring. PPP works fine and I use a
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 13, 2001
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              Just to add my own experience. I selected a "high" (RH 7.1) firewall
              because I don't know enough to do any of my own configuring.

              PPP works fine and I use a the network connection with out a problem.

              My understanding (which could be wrong) is that high just means no
              in-bound access is allowed. That is to say, I can't ftp or ssh or telnet
              to my machine when it's on the network, but I can still use all these
              lovely tools from my laptop going outward.

              I read some detail somewhere that said "Doing streaming media through
              firewalls is hard..." I stream stuff on my computer all the time.

              So I am naively hoping that my computer is safe from invasion.

              I guess another thing to say would be, "Do your release's security
              updates."

              Cheers,
              John O.

              On Thu, 13 Sep 2001 jsc3@... wrote:

              > > On Wednesday 12 September 2001 10:42 pm, you wrote:
              > > > So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets
              > > > his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation)
              > > > setup so that he can connect to the outside world?
              > > >
              > > I dunno .. use wvdial to use a modem to connect to the world ... or iconfig
              > > and route to use a network interface
              > >
              > > > It seems that with "medium security" the only thing one
              > > > can do is send emails in the localhost, connect via PPP
              > > > to the internet but then ONLY be able to ping the IP
              > > > number of the remote PPP host (and that is it), so no
              > > > SMTP connections to the outside, no UUCP over TCP, no
              > > > web browsing, etc. I really don't have time to spend
              > > > reading IPTABLES/IPCHAINS, I have been without mail for
              > > > nearly a week.
              >
              > I think your problem is NOT with the firewall. The firewall
              > does not restrict outbound connections as far as I know. You
              > may need to look for the answer to your problem elsewhere, probably
              > in the network configuration itself.
              >
              > > you sound like you just took a class on Microsoft security
              >
              > No need to be insulting, particularly when in this case it is
              > you yourself who are wrong (see my response to the next statement).
              >
              > > there is no such thing as "medium" security.
              >
              > Actually, there is, at least when you install "Redhat 7.X". When you
              > do the graphical installation (I haven't done the text install for
              > either 7.0 or 7.1) you are asked to choose from one of three security
              > settings - none, medium and high, if I recall. There is also an option
              > with medium and high security to specify additional ports that will
              > remain open.
              >
              > > everyone does their own securing for whatever reason they have. For example,
              > > I run oidentd binded to port 113 running as the nobody group, and ssh binded
              > > a lovely port above 1024 running as nobody either. Those are the only two
              > > ports I have open to the world. I run kernel 2.2.19 with ipchains, connected
              > > to the net on a cable modem. Some people I know have lots of ports open, and
              > > run kernel 2.4.x with iptables. Go to linuxdoc.org and RTFM a little.
              >
              > This is all reasonable. I have a similar setup, though I run ssh on the
              > standard port (22). Be advised that if you have Redhat 7.0 (haven't
              > scanned my new 7.1 system yet), and you scan it with nmap/nessus, you
              > will probably see LOTS of ports opened, even if you closed most of them
              > yourself. This is because portsentry is listening on those ports and
              > logging scans (took me a couple of minutes to figure out what is going
              > on). I highly recommend nmap, nessus, snort and ethereal. nmap is a
              > "basic" scanner. nessus is a full-featured scanner that also checks
              > for common exploits. snort is an intrusion detection system, better
              > than portsentry in many ways. ethereal is a network sniffer. In my
              > opinion, everybody should have at least nmap to check out there own
              > system after installation, and ethereal for troubleshooting network
              > problems (ethereal is MUCH easier to use than tcpdump).
              >
              > > > If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
              > > > please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
              > > > thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
              > > > to 6.2+.
              >
              > I don't think this will help (it might) as I think the problem is
              > your network configuration, not the firewall software.
              >
              > > you should really read a little, any distro can be secured without
              > > reinstalling the entire system.
              >
              > I don't think he is talking about reinstalling to gain security,
              > he is thinking about reinstalling to get rid of the security. This
              > is a mistake in my opinion, and I do agree that with a little
              > reading he can resolve his problem in the same time as it would
              > take to reinstall, and he would learn something. "reinstall the
              > OS" is definitely a Microsoft-like way of fixing the problem.
              >
              > --
              > John Cronin
              > mailto: `echo NjsOc3@... | sed 's/[NOSPAM]//g'`
              >
              >
              >
              > --------------------------------------------------------------
              > Please post your X config files in the group links or database
              > FAQ: http://www.whacked.net/ldl-faq
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >

              There's very good air where there's trees.
              There's more oxygen
              because they breath out oxygen like we breath out... the other.
              - Sample from 'The Altogether'
            • Sunny Dubey
              ... no no no ... I was trying to be insluting at all it was ment as a joke ... ( I guess I should stop *trying* to joke) I apologize to degt@hotmail.com I
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 13, 2001
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                On Thursday 13 September 2001 10:06 am, you wrote:

                >
                > > you sound like you just took a class on Microsoft security
                >
                > No need to be insulting, particularly when in this case it is
                > you yourself who are wrong (see my response to the next statement).
                >
                no no no ... I was trying to be insluting at all
                it was ment as a joke ... ( I guess I should stop *trying* to joke)
                I apologize to degt@... I seemed offensive at any point.

                > > there is no such thing as "medium" security.
                >
                > Actually, there is, at least when you install "Redhat 7.X". When you
                > do the graphical installation (I haven't done the text install for
                > either 7.0 or 7.1) you are asked to choose from one of three security
                > settings - none, medium and high, if I recall. There is also an option
                > with medium and high security to specify additional ports that will
                > remain open.
                >
                no, when I said that "there is no such thing as 'medium' security", I was
                talking about that sort of thing to UNIX in general, not so much as a redhat
                installer specfic thing. I wasn't too aware that redhat had a security
                option setting at the installer.


                > > everyone does their own securing for whatever reason they have. For
                > > example, I run oidentd binded to port 113 running as the nobody group,
                > > and ssh binded a lovely port above 1024 running as nobody either. Those
                > > are the only two ports I have open to the world. I run kernel 2.2.19
                > > with ipchains, connected to the net on a cable modem. Some people I know
                > > have lots of ports open, and run kernel 2.4.x with iptables. Go to
                > > linuxdoc.org and RTFM a little.
                >
                > This is all reasonable. I have a similar setup, though I run ssh on the
                > standard port (22). Be advised that if you have Redhat 7.0 (haven't
                > scanned my new 7.1 system yet), and you scan it with nmap/nessus, you
                > will probably see LOTS of ports opened, even if you closed most of them
                > yourself. This is because portsentry is listening on those ports and
                > logging scans (took me a couple of minutes to figure out what is going
                > on). I highly recommend nmap, nessus, snort and ethereal. nmap is a
                > "basic" scanner. nessus is a full-featured scanner that also checks
                > for common exploits. snort is an intrusion detection system, better
                > than portsentry in many ways. ethereal is a network sniffer. In my
                > opinion, everybody should have at least nmap to check out there own
                > system after installation, and ethereal for troubleshooting network
                > problems (ethereal is MUCH easier to use than tcpdump).
                >
                > > > If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
                > > > please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
                > > > thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
                > > > to 6.2+.
                >
                > I don't think this will help (it might) as I think the problem is
                > your network configuration, not the firewall software.
                >
                > > you should really read a little, any distro can be secured without
                > > reinstalling the entire system.
                >
                > I don't think he is talking about reinstalling to gain security,
                > he is thinking about reinstalling to get rid of the security. This
                > is a mistake in my opinion, and I do agree that with a little
                > reading he can resolve his problem in the same time as it would
                > take to reinstall, and he would learn something. "reinstall the
                > OS" is definitely a Microsoft-like way of fixing the problem.
                well, when I first got my LInux CD (redhat 5.2) I think I reinstalled it like
                5 times the very first week. I had no idea what I was doing, and couldn't
                seem to figure out what to do, and so I figured I'd reinstall and make life
                easier. Sure reinstalling might not be the best thing in the world ... but I
                think that for one who has yet to learn about linux, getting it up and
                running to the point that they can do "cool" stuff on it is a first.


                Sunny Dubey
                Bless America
              • herby
                Hello Suny, i have a suse 7.2 installation and my experience is that with the Kppp dialer it doesnot work because he sets no DNS servers. With the vwdial in my
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 19, 2001
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                  Hello Suny,

                  i have a suse 7.2 installation and my experience is that with the Kppp dialer
                  it doesnot work because he sets no DNS servers. With the vwdial in my case it
                  works fine. he gets the ipaddress and DNS entrys from the provider. So in
                  your case it could be if you are not defining the DNS servers manually that
                  the are not correct set when you work with the wrong dialer.

                  i hope it helps
                  Herbert

                  Am Donnerstag, 13. September 2001 04:24 schrieben Sie:
                  > On Wednesday 12 September 2001 10:42 pm, you wrote:
                  > > So how does a person that has no knowledge of firewall gets
                  > > his Linux (Dell Inspiron 7500, laptop class installation)
                  > > setup so that he can connect to the outside world?
                  >
                  > I dunno .. use wvdial to use a modem to connect to the world ... or iconfig
                  > and route to use a network interface
                  >
                  > > It seems that with "medium security" the only thing one
                  > > can do is send emails in the localhost, connect via PPP
                  > > to the internet but then ONLY be able to ping the IP
                  > > number of the remote PPP host (and that is it), so no
                  > > SMTP connections to the outside, no UUCP over TCP, no
                  > > web browsing, etc. I really don't have time to spend
                  > > reading IPTABLES/IPCHAINS, I have been without mail for
                  > > nearly a week.
                  >
                  > you sound like you just took a class on Microsoft security
                  > there is no such thing as "medium" security.
                  > everyone does their own securing for whatever reason they have. For
                  > example, I run oidentd binded to port 113 running as the nobody group, and
                  > ssh binded a lovely port above 1024 running as nobody either. Those are
                  > the only two ports I have open to the world. I run kernel 2.2.19 with
                  > ipchains, connected to the net on a cable modem. Some people I know have
                  > lots of ports open, and run kernel 2.4.x with iptables. Go to linuxdoc.org
                  > and RTFM a little.
                  >
                  > > If anybody had this problem and knows a reasonable solution
                  > > please tell me. I really don't want to reinstall the whole
                  > > thing only to select "low/no security", much less downgrade
                  > > to 6.2+.
                  >
                  > you should really read a little, any distro can be secured without
                  > reinstalling the entire system.
                  >
                  > Sunny Dubey

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                • degt@hotmail.com
                  ... Well you are mistaken :) I am anti-Microsoft for most of the time, NEVER took any MS course (never will). These terms i did not invent, if you look at the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 30, 2001
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                    > you sound like you just took a class on Microsoft security
                    > there is no such thing as "medium" security.
                    > everyone does their own securing for whatever reason they have.

                    Well you are mistaken :) I am anti-Microsoft for most of the
                    time, NEVER took any MS course (never will). These terms i
                    did not invent, if you look at the Gnome Lokkit tool you
                    will see that it allows you to select "high/medium/low/none"
                    for security. Everything is relative of course, you should
                    know that :)

                    > to the net on a cable modem. Some people I know have lots of
                    ports open, and
                    > run kernel 2.4.x with iptables. Go to linuxdoc.org and RTFM a
                    little.
                    >
                    > Sunny Dubey

                    Believe me I did plenty of the RTFM, that's why I am asking.
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