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Re: device drivers

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  • Sword King
    I m with Chad on this one. Downloading and burning a new distro takes less time than figuring out how to fix an bad one for me, even on a 33.6k modem. Ubuntu
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 15, 2007
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      I'm with Chad on this one.

      Downloading and burning a new distro takes less time than figuring out
      how to fix an 'bad' one for me, even on a 33.6k modem.

      Ubuntu 6.06/Dapper took some work to get working, and I never got
      wireless going over the 3-4 months I used it (PPC, laptop & desktop
      PCs), but Edgy (6.10) worked flawlessly out of the
      box -- with wireless, USB Floppy, Hard and Flash Drives, Video Display,
      sound, everything I need on my laptop & PC (my Mac gave up the
      ghost). I must have 80-100 Linux CDs around here and none of them
      worked on this laptop out of the box, All needed tweaking, most to
      such an extent I gave up (I give up easily, most of the time). Mind you,
      unlike my son, I don't play fancy 3D online games, so my laptop now
      sports DualBoot XP and UbuntuEdgy, and I can do pretty much
      whatever I want in either, but Ubuntu is free (as in Free Speech, and free
      doughnuts, not free beer, which'll get you drunk), so I use it freely, so to
      speak.

      HTH, SK


      --- In linux-dell-laptops@yahoogroups.com, Chad Sutton <csutton@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I'm pretty sure that Fedora 6 will have everything you need to read and
      > write to NTFS partitions. I would really spend the time downloading
      the
      > latest Fedora. If you aren't tied to Fedora, I would suggest Ubuntu
      > 6.10. You will get everything you need on 1 CD. Ubuntu will
      > automatically recognize your Windows partitions and mount it for you.
      >
      > Here you can see the results from my mount command that shows
      my NTFS
      > partition loaded
      >
      > /dev/sda1 on /media/sda1 type ntfs (rw,nls=utf8,umask=007,gid=46)
      >
      > Fedora 2 probably has the ability to read NTFS, but I doubt it can read
      > and write out of the box. By the time you find the right packages and
      > install everything to get NTFS read/write, my guess is that you could
      > have ordered a CD or DVD in the mail or have downloaded it.
      >
      > You can order it through the mail here
      > http://www.linuxcd.org/view_distro.php?id_distro=196
      >
      > Otherwise download Ubuntu through http://ubuntu.com
      >
      >
      > i_love_chocolate_pie wrote:
      > >
      > > I have just installed Fedora 2(It takes too long to download
      something
      > > new and i am too cheap to buy it) on the second partition of my
      laptop.
      > > I need to bring my files from my windows partition to my Linux
      > > partition and wouldn't you know. My linux does not read my USB
      flash
      > > drive.0
      > >
      > > Help on either how to get my linux to read my Flash drive or another
      > > way to get my files transferred would very much appreichiated.
      > >
      > > P.S. PLEASE do not tell me to just burn a CD. I am not stupid.
      > >
      > > Thanks
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Later,
      > Chad Sutton
      > csutton@...
      > http://chadarius.com
      > http://stephandchadsutton.com
      >
    • Nick
      If you really don t want to download a newer distro, you can always update your kernel. Go to kernel.org and download the newest one, I don t know if fedora
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 16, 2007
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        If you really don't want to download a newer distro, you can always update your kernel. Go to kernel.org and download the newest one, I don't know if fedora has a program to get the kernel source for you. After you use the make menuconfig, go in and make sure it has the NTFS filesystem enabled so you can read from it. Your pen drive may also be in fat32. You didn't really say. The other thing you can do for windows is download a program to read ext2 file system. If you have ext2 or ext3 partitions in fedora, you can load them in windows as a new partition, then just copy directly over without using your pen drive.  I think this is a place you can get the ext2 program for windows.

        http://www.fs-driver.org/

        Hope this helps,

        Nick


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      • Andrew McGlashan
        ... I use this one: http://www.ext2fsd.com/ Kind Regards AndrewM Andrew McGlashan Broadband Solutions now including VoIP Current Fixed Line No: 03 8705 0300
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 16, 2007
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          Nick wrote:
          > http://www.fs-driver.org/

          I use this one:
          http://www.ext2fsd.com/

          Kind Regards

          AndrewM

          Andrew McGlashan
          Broadband Solutions now including VoIP

          Current Fixed Line No: 03 8705 0300
          Mobile: 04 2574 1827 Fax: 03 8790 1224

          National No: 1300 85 3804

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        • Gilbert Mendoza
          Just to add on to the advice given thus far, if you wish to write to your NTFS partitions while in Linux, stable write support can also be achieved through
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 16, 2007
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            Just to add on to the advice given thus far, if you wish to write to
            your NTFS partitions while in Linux, stable "write" support can also be
            achieved through ntfs-3g.

            http://www.ntfs-3g.org/

            In Ubuntu, make sure you have the Universe repositories enabled, and
            it's as simple as "sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g".

            You mentioned Fedora, which I believe also has a pre-compiled RPM. If
            not, compiling the software is very easy to do.

            The driver uses the "fuse" kernel module which is also useful for many
            other projects including one of my favorites, 'sshfs".

            Once installed and loaded you can mount the drive manually or
            automatically through /etc/fstab. See the ntfs-3g home page for the
            very simple instructions on how to use it.

            Regards.




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