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Getting started with Linux

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  • jimburt372
    This is my first post, and it may be out of line, if so I apologize, but it is the main thing I am dealing with right now. I have an I8100, and I am just
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2003
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      This is my first post, and it may be out of line, if so I apologize,
      but it is the main thing I am dealing with right now.
      I have an I8100, and I am just getting started with Linux. I am
      running RH9. I know that the Nike approach is best, you know, Just
      Do It. But, like most people now days, I am really short on time to
      just tinker with new things. Does anyone have a simple suggestions
      for getting "fluent" in linux? I have a number of books that I have
      read, but they seem to cover installation and then leave you to
      figure the rest out for yourself. I have the 'install and get
      everything operational' part down. What I need to learn now, is
      the 'what to do next' part. I need to learn how to shut off unneeded
      daemons/services, identify what services/daemons that are associated
      with what activities, etc... Bsasically the "real stuff" for doing
      day-to-day usage and network connection type stuff. I have been
      working as a PC tech then Network tech since 1993, but all of my
      history is on the Novell then MS side of the world. I took a 1 hour
      UNIX class that I slept through in 1991, before there really was a
      Linux, at which time I had no desire to mess with "the big UNIX
      systems."
      Any pointers, or sites, books, whatever recommendations would be very
      much appreciated.
    • Arnold Troeger
      ... I would suggest taking one task at a time, locate the appropriate HOWTO document for it and try to get it working. The Linux Documentation Project website
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2003
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        jimburt372 wrote:
        > This is my first post, and it may be out of line, if so I apologize,
        > but it is the main thing I am dealing with right now.
        > I have an I8100, and I am just getting started with Linux. I am
        > running RH9. I know that the Nike approach is best, you know, Just
        > Do It. But, like most people now days, I am really short on time to
        > just tinker with new things. Does anyone have a simple suggestions
        > for getting "fluent" in linux? I have a number of books that I have
        > read, but they seem to cover installation and then leave you to
        > figure the rest out for yourself. I have the 'install and get
        > everything operational' part down. What I need to learn now, is
        > the 'what to do next' part. I need to learn how to shut off unneeded
        > daemons/services, identify what services/daemons that are associated
        > with what activities, etc... Bsasically the "real stuff" for doing
        > day-to-day usage and network connection type stuff. I have been
        > working as a PC tech then Network tech since 1993, but all of my
        > history is on the Novell then MS side of the world. I took a 1 hour
        > UNIX class that I slept through in 1991, before there really was a
        > Linux, at which time I had no desire to mess with "the big UNIX
        > systems."
        > Any pointers, or sites, books, whatever recommendations would be very
        > much appreciated.
        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >

        I would suggest taking one task at a time, locate the appropriate HOWTO document
        for it and try to get it working. The Linux Documentation Project website
        http://www.tldp.org/docs.html is a good place to start. Google is also an
        excellent resource. This mailing list is another. Enjoy :-)

        Cheers,
        Arnold

        --
        Arnold Troeger Unocal Thailand
        Phone: 011-66-2-545-5456 5th Floor, Tower 3, SCB Park Plaza
        FAX: 011-66-2-545-5374 19 Ratchadapisek Road, Chatuchak
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        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      • Sean Gibbins
        On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 05:01:05 -0000 ... Nah, forget it, your post is entirely appropriate. ... Well, a good foundation in basic commands as issued through the
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2003
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          On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 05:01:05 -0000
          "jimburt372" <jimmy.burt@...> wrote:

          > This is my first post, and it may be out of line, if so I
          > apologize,

          Nah, forget it, your post is entirely appropriate.

          > Any pointers, or sites, books, whatever recommendations
          > would be very much appreciated.

          Well, a good foundation in basic commands as issued through
          the command line is invaluable. Without it you will be
          puzzled by a lot of what you are asked to do in response to
          your questions here, etc.

          It can be achieved through the numerous online resources out
          there or alternative one of the many books available. I used
          to like 'Sams Teach Yourself Linux in 10 Mins' as it was
          easily digestable and contained enough of the basics (but
          not too many) to whet the newbie's appetite and get them up
          and running. I think this may be out of print now, but there
          is a Unix equivalent that is (no surprises here) virtually
          the same book.

          A book that goes a little further is 'Sams TY Unix in an
          Hour'; alittle more in-depth and again, easily achievable.

          Anyway, I hope you rediscover the same enjoyment of
          computing as I did through LInux!

          Sean
          --
          The sooner you fall behind, the more time you'll have to
          catch up. - Steven Wright
        • Steve Harris
          ... Well, you can do the first by running redhat-config-services, you should get a bit of explanation about each service that appears there and you can usually
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 2, 2003
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            On Tue, Dec 02, 2003 at 05:01:05AM -0000, jimburt372 wrote:
            > the 'what to do next' part. I need to learn how to shut off unneeded
            > daemons/services, identify what services/daemons that are associated
            > with what activities, etc... Bsasically the "real stuff" for doing

            Well, you can do the first by running redhat-config-services, you should
            get a bit of explanation about each service that appears there and you can
            usually get more by running
            man <name-of-service>
            And even more in /usr/share/doc/

            FWIW, I leanrt unix by looking in /bin/ and running man on the commands in
            there, but I was a student with too much time on my hands :)

            - Steve
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