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Re: [linux-dell-laptops] Networking

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  • david carlton
    ... I m not sure I understand the scenario: are you getting internet access while on the train? If so, cool! (If not, obviously you can t expect your desktop
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 2, 2002
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      On Fri, 02 Aug 2002 12:32:44 -0000, "d99ma" <d99ma@...> said:

      > I have the following setup at home. I have a desktop computer that
      > is always on and working as a gateway to Internet for my
      > laptop. What I want to do is to have my home directory available
      > both on the laptop and on the desktop. So if I work on something at
      > home and saves it to my home directory i can work on it on my laptop
      > when commuting to work, and when I get to work an realizes that I
      > have left my laptop on the train I can connect to my home desktop
      > and retreive the file. How do I achieve this in a nice way?

      I'm not sure I understand the scenario: are you getting internet
      access while on the train? If so, cool! (If not, obviously you can't
      expect your desktop to know about files that you've edited on your
      laptop since the last time your laptop was connected to the internet,
      or at least to a phone connection to your desktop somehow.)

      Anyways, the solution that I use, which involves explicitly
      synchronizing the two systems at appropriate times, is rsync; see
      <http://math.stanford.edu/~carlton/i8200/rsync.html>. If your laptop
      _always_ has a reliable internet connection to your desktop, then you
      could try some other more transparent solution (NFS or AFS or
      something).

      David Carlton | <http://math.stanford.edu/~carlton/>
      carlton@... | I8200: <http://math.stanford.edu/~carlton/i8200/>
    • Thomas Deselaers
      ... OK, there are several possibilities: 1. nfs a network-filesystem 2. rsync a tool to automatically synchronize computers 3. sfs (which is a secure remote
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 2, 2002
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        On Fri, Aug 02, 2002 at 12:32:44PM -0000, d99ma wrote:
        > Hi
        >
        > I have the following setup at home. I have a desktop computer that is
        > always on and working as a gateway to Internet for my laptop. What I
        > want to do is to have my home directory available both on the laptop
        > and on the desktop. So if I work on something at home and saves it to
        > my home directory i can work on it on my laptop when commuting to
        > work, and when I get to work an realizes that I have left my laptop
        > on the train I can connect to my home desktop and retreive the file.
        > How do I achieve this in a nice way?

        OK, there are several possibilities:

        1. nfs a network-filesystem
        2. rsync a tool to automatically synchronize computers
        3. sfs (which is a secure remote filesystem)
        4. unison a tool to automatically synchronize computers with some
        interaction if something was changed and cannot be solved
        automagically (more or less)


        I use sfs _and_ unison.

        sfs to access my home-computer from anywhere and unison to synchronize
        my laptop to my home computer as a backup.

        5. another option would probably lie in coda, which is an advanced
        networking filesystem with offline support and such and such, but I
        don't know how far the development has gone there and I have never
        tried it.


        --
        Gruß
        thomas

        thomas@... «<>» JabberID on request «<>» GPG/PGP key on request
        «< Unless stated otherwise everything I write is just my opinion >»
      • Paul
        ... Even though it s Linux, why not use Samba and smbclient?
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 2, 2002
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          >
          >
          >1. nfs a network-filesystem
          >
          Even though it's Linux, why not use Samba and smbclient?
        • Juergen Mueller
          Hi Thomas, ... Did anyone on this list try this? I wanted to ask this before, since a colleague of mine (XP ONLY user) always smiles at me saying that Linux
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 3, 2002
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            Hi Thomas,

            > 5. another option would probably lie in coda, which is an advanced
            > networking filesystem with offline support and such and such, but I
            > don't know how far the development has gone there and I have never
            > tried it.

            Did anyone on this list try this? I wanted to ask this before, since a
            colleague of mine (XP ONLY user) always smiles at me saying that Linux
            doesn't have this "offline folder" support that XP has...

            Any ideas? Solutions??

            Cheers
            Juergen
          • Walt Pennington
            Would VNC (Virtual Network Connection) provide a solution? If the home desktop is connected, could VNC be used to allow a connection to retrieve the files
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 3, 2002
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              Would VNC (Virtual Network Connection) provide a solution? If the home
              desktop is connected, could VNC be used to allow a connection to retrieve the
              files that were unavailable on the desktop?

              Walt


              > Hi
              >
              > I have the following setup at home. I have a desktop computer that is
              > always on and working as a gateway to Internet for my laptop. What I
              > want to do is to have my home directory available both on the laptop
              > and on the desktop. So if I work on something at home and saves it to
              > my home directory i can work on it on my laptop when commuting to
              > work, and when I get to work an realizes that I have left my laptop
              > on the train I can connect to my home desktop and retreive the file.
              > How do I achieve this in a nice way?
            • James D Strandboge
              ... The problem is a very simple one. Basically when you save something, you want it saved in two places, otherwise called a mirror . The problem with
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 3, 2002
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                On Sat, 2002-08-03 at 13:05, Juergen Mueller wrote:
                > Hi Thomas,
                >
                > > 5. another option would probably lie in coda, which is an advanced
                > > networking filesystem with offline support and such and such, but I
                > > don't know how far the development has gone there and I have never
                > > tried it.
                >
                > Did anyone on this list try this? I wanted to ask this before, since a
                > colleague of mine (XP ONLY user) always smiles at me saying that Linux
                > doesn't have this "offline folder" support that XP has...
                >

                The problem is a very simple one. Basically when you save something,
                you want it saved in two places, otherwise called a 'mirror'. The
                problem with network filesystems like samba and nfs (and the others) is
                that the files ultimately reside on one computer. You requested that
                the laptop and desktop always be in sync, no matter which is doing the
                writing. Some of the other network filesystems have cache's and the
                like that you can use in offline mode, but you never cache the entire
                filesystem, just what you have already opened, so these will be
                limiting.

                I don't know how XP does this, but Linux most certainly has this
                functionality-- it is called rsync. You can do this securely with ssh
                too and it is a great tool. Of course, to make it all transparent, you
                need to play with it and run it from cron and/or from an init script
                (either on shutdown or boot).

                Off the top of my head, I would suggest running rsync as part of the
                shutdown and startup sequence of the laptop, or whenever the network is
                coming up or down on your home LAN. This way, whenever you make changes
                to your laptop, when you shutdown, they are automatically saved to the
                desktop (laptop is source and desktop is destination). If you make
                changes on the desktop, they will be merged to the laptop on boot
                (desktop is source and laptop is destination). Read the man page for
                rsync-- there are a lot of options. One I can say you will definitely
                want to use is '-u'. This means that something that is older on the
                source computer won't overwrite something that is newer on the
                destination computer.

                As far as making changes on both at the same time, you may want to bring
                a network filesystem like (like nfs) into the fold in addition to using
                rsync, since it is designed to handle files being changed by multiple
                users concurrently. This would seem to be an odd case for your
                situation based on the description.

                This 'offline folder mode' that XP has I doubt would come close to
                giving you the flexibility that rsync has. Regardless, you can smile
                back at your buddy and say that Linux most definitely can do this.

                Jamie Strandboge
              • Thomas Deselaers
                ... Yes, the unison thing is the solution to this. I know people on Windows use unison (yes it is available for windows, too), and there are some advances. It
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 4, 2002
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                  On Sat, Aug 03, 2002 at 07:05:22PM +0200, Juergen Mueller wrote:
                  > Hi Thomas,
                  >
                  > > 5. another option would probably lie in coda, which is an advanced
                  > > networking filesystem with offline support and such and such, but I
                  > > don't know how far the development has gone there and I have never
                  > > tried it.
                  >
                  > Did anyone on this list try this? I wanted to ask this before, since a
                  > colleague of mine (XP ONLY user) always smiles at me saying that Linux
                  > doesn't have this "offline folder" support that XP has...


                  Yes, the unison thing is the solution to this.
                  I know people on Windows use unison (yes it is available for windows,
                  too), and there are some advances. It is possible to use it over ssh and
                  such and such.



                  --
                  Gruß
                  thomas

                  thomas@... «<>» JabberID on request «<>» GPG/PGP key on request
                  «< Unless stated otherwise everything I write is just my opinion >»
                • d99ma
                  Thanks for all answers. I will go with rsync as it looks the most promising. /Martin
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 5, 2002
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                    Thanks for all answers. I will go with rsync as it looks the most
                    promising.

                    /Martin
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