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The Scout Report -- December 7, 2012 (HTML)

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  • Sam Vaknin author of "Malignant Self-love
    The Scout Report -- Volume 18, Number 49 The Scout Report December 7, 2012 -- Volume 18, Number 49 A Publication of Internet Scout Computer Sciences
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 7, 2012
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      The Scout Report -- Volume 18, Number 49

      The Scout Report

      December 7, 2012 -- Volume 18, Number 49

      A Publication of Internet Scout
      Computer Sciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison




      Research and Education

        The Center for Native American Youth

        College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage

        Official 1940 Census Website

        National Air and Space Museum: Webcast Archive

        Virginia Tech Transportation Institute

        National Bureau of Economic Research: Bulletin on Aging and Health

        Penn Museum: Educator's Guides

        Content, Context, and Capacity

      General Interest

        MIT Media Lab: Demos and Downloads

        MedlinePlus: Videos and Cool Tools

        The Tennessee Historical Society

        The Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project

        Physics: Lesson Plans on the Internet

        Sing About Science & Math: Lesson Plans

        The Salt Institute for Documentary Studies

        Ehon: The Artist and the Book in Japan

      Network Tools

        SmartSettings 1.2

        MergePay

      In the News

        Despite economic troubles around the world, skyscrapers continue to rise




      Copyright and subscription information appear at the end of the Scout Report. For more information on all services of Internet Scout, please visit our Website: http://scout.wisc.edu/ If you'd like to know how the Internet Scout team selects resources for inclusion in the Scout Report, visit our Selection Criteria page at: https://scout.wisc.edu/scout-report/selection-criteria The Scout Report on the Web: Current issue: http://scout.wisc.edu/Reports/ScoutReport/Current This issue: http://scout.wisc.edu/Reports/ScoutReport/2012/scout-{filedate} Feedback is always welcome: scout@...



      Research and Education

      The Center for Native American Youth

      http://www.cnay.org/

      Based at the Aspen Institute, the Center for Native American Youth is "dedicated to improving the health, safety and overall well-being of Native American youth through communication, policy development and advocacy. The Center was founded by former US Senator Byron Dorgan to communicate with and assist tribes with the challenges Native youth face today. On the homepage, visitors can make their way through seven areas, including Our Work, Resources, Champions for Change, and Media Gallery. In the Resources area visitors can learn about the Be Excited About Reading (BEAR) Project, national help hotlines, and jobs and internships with the Center's key partners around the country. The Media Gallery contains public service announcements, their YouTube channel, and newsletters dating back to June 2011. A highlight of this resource is the Listening to Youth section, which offers direct testimony from young Native Americans about what's important to them. [KMG]


      College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage

      http://www.maa.org/pubs/monthly_jan1962-StabilityofMarriage.html

      This year, the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded jointly to economist Alvin E. Roth and mathematician Lloyd S. Shapley for their work on market design and matching theory, which relate to how people and companies find and select one another in everything from marriage to school choice to jobs to organ donations. Shapley first developed his ideas on analyzing resource allocation in a classic early paper co-authored with David Gale titled "College Admissions and the Stability of Marriage". Recently, the Mathematical Association of America plucked this 1962 article out of their fine archives and placed it online for the general public. Today, the article remains one of the American Mathematical Monthly's most cited works. [KMG]


      Official 1940 Census Website

      http://1940census.archives.gov/

      The official 1940 Census website went online in last spring. It is an invaluable resource for genealogists, historians, and the curious alike. In the "Getting Started" area, visitors will learn how the census works and the best way to search for specific records. The steps here include five discrete directions for correcting locating a specific individual in the 1940 census records. Also, a series of directed questions will help visitors focus in on getting to the records they require as quickly as possible. The "Census Search" allows users to search for people by location or enumeration districts. For more information, visit the "About the 1940 Census" for historical context as well as a recap of the ways in which the Census was conducted that year. [KMG]


      National Air and Space Museum: Webcast Archive

      http://airandspace.si.edu/webcasts/archive.cfm

      The National Air and Space Museum offers a veritable cornucopia of programming each year, and many of these events end up right here on this site. For people who can't make it to Washington, D.C., these talks and lectures are a real find. Currently, the archived events here date back to 2007. There are many highlights, but first-time visitors might do well to start by watching "Gamma Ray Bursts and the Birth of Black Holes" or the terrific "Suited for Space: The Science of the Spacesuit". Visitors who enjoy these materials shouldn't hesitate to sign up for the "What's Up� museum newsletter. The site also contains a detailed calendar of upcoming events for museumgoers to plan their visits accordingly. [KMG]


      Virginia Tech Transportation Institute

      http://www.vtti.vt.edu/

      The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI) is the institution's largest university-level research center. The organization is "dedicated to conducting research to save lives, save time, and save money." On their homepage, visitors can read the "Spotlight on VTTI" to get some highlights about their work including focus on transportation and an aging population and other topics as of late. Transportation fanatics won't want to miss the Publications area hosting dozens of papers on technical topics such as map-based navigation, dynamic roadway signage, and military vehicles. Visitors can also read their annual reports, learn about employment opportunities, and check out the Virginia Smart Road, which is their closed, stat e-of-the-art, test-bed research facility. [KMG]


      National Bureau of Economic Research: Bulletin on Aging and Health

      http://www.nber.org/aginghealth/

      The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) produces a staggering array of working papers, research documents, and policy briefs for use by people in the public and private sectors. Since the fall of 2002, they have published over 40 installments of their "Bulletin on Aging and Health". Visitors to the site can take advantage of their research and insights by browsing around this archive. These articles are based on extensive academic research and recent titles include "Retirement Before the Social Security Entitlement Age�, “Why Are Recessions Good for Your Health?", and "How Intellectual Property Rights Affect Innovation". Also, there are "NBER Profiles" here that look a t the research agendas of different scholars associated with the NBER. Persons with an interest in the intersection of economics, health care policy, and public policy matters will want to revisit this site on a regular basis to stay abreast of future publications that are released to the site. [KMG]


      Penn Museum: Educator's Guides

      http://www.penn.museum/program-resources.html

      The University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is one of the standout destinations on campus. The Museum explores a wide range of cultures, and thousands of teachers and young people come from around the world to learn from its many displays and exhibits. These guides for educators can be used in conjunction with an in-person visit or to complement other classroom activities. Visitors can take advantage of five high-quality guides that cover Ancient Egypt, China, Math, and Mesoamerica, and also contain classroom activities that involve writing exercises, problem solving, quizzes, puzzles, and much more. These materials can be used in a range of settings and their easy prose and accessible manner make them most useful. [KMG]


      Content, Context, and Capacity

      http://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog?f%5Bispartof_facet%5B%5D=Content%2C%20Context%2C%20Capacity

      This compelling collection from the North Carolina State University Libraries Digital Collection group brings together materials related to the African-American experience at the university in the late 20th century. The collection contains 445 items including newsletters, informal posters, correspondence, and faculty notes among other things. Visitors can search the items by format, topic, keyword, or date. First-time visitors should look closely at the documents pertaining to the "Black and White Ball", which was an attempt to bring African-American and white students closer toge ther in an organized social setting. This set is a fascinating way to learn about how one major school in the American South began to address a wide range of issues around racial identity in an increasingly multicultural society. [KMG]



      General Interest

      MIT Media Lab: Demos and Downloads

      http://www.media.mit.edu/research/demos-downloads

      The MIT Media Lab has produced dozens of compelling projects over its long history. They also have a longstanding tradition of sharing their work with others who might be intrigued by their various initiatives. This site provides demonstrations and downloadable files for the general public. Currently there are ten projects on the site, including "ConceptNet", "Open Mind Common Sense", and "Outbreaks Near Me." The "Outbreaks Near Me" feature is an app that allows visitors access to real-time disease outbreak information along with the ability to report outbreaks as well. The "Open Mind Common Sense" feature enables computers to learn general knowledge from ordinary people over th e web. There are seven other projects to explore here and visitors will definitely want to share the site with friends and associates. [KMG]


      MedlinePlus: Videos and Cool Tools

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/videosandcooltools.html

      MedlinePlus has a wide palette of interesting resources, and this corner of their prodigious website is well worth a close look. First-time visitors can start with the resources profiled on the website which include interactive videos on fighting colon cancer and how to screen for depression. Furthermore, the Calculators & Quizzes area includes an alcohol calorie calculator along with a "Can You Recognize a Heart Attack?" quiz. There's a bit of fun and whimsy in the Games area where one can learn about the immune system via the "Immune System Defender Game Scrub Club" and a clutch of activities about the importance of sleep. Also, the site includes a section t itled "Understanding Medical Words" that decodes some of the basic medical terminology that would be encountered in a routine visit to the doctor. [KMG]


      The Tennessee Historical Society

      http://www.tennesseehistory.org/

      Established in 1849, the Tennessee Historical Society is a non-profit, membership organization headquartered in Nashville to "promote interest in and preservation of all matters relating to the history of Tennessee." On their homepage, visitors can take advantage of seven different sections, including About, Publications, Programs, and Research & Collections. In the Publications area, visitors can learn about their twelve-volume series "Tennessee in the Civil War", and also learn about their publication, the Tennessee Historical Quarterly. Moving along, in the Programs area visitors can learn about their special lectures and talks. The Research & Collections area features information about their extensive holding s, along with a link to the online Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. This publication is a real find, as visitors can check out interactive features on the Civil War, Nashville's Music Row, and Daniel Boone. [KMG]


      The Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project

      http://ptfs.library.cmu.edu/pjn/index.jsp

      This engaging project from the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries archives over one hundred years of Jewish newspapers published in Pittsburgh such as the Jewish Criterion, the American Jewish Outlook, and the Jewish Chronicle. It's worth noting that the first Jews in Pittsburgh consisted of a small community of German immigrants who came to the area in the 1840s. It was not until 1895 when the first English-language Jewish newspaper (the Criterion) was first published and they began extensive coverage of events throughout the Jewish community. Visitors can use the Browse tab to look around for specific volumes of interest or to search all of the newspapers here by keyword or publicatio n date. It's a great way to learn about Pittsburgh's history and one of the Steel City's most vital groups of citizens. [KMG]


      Physics: Lesson Plans on the Internet

      http://www.csun.edu/science/ref/lessons/index.html

      Professor Norman Herr has worked tirelessly to promote science education through this professional site, and it remains a fine resource for science educators. Here visitors will find a vast range of resources related to teaching physics with a bit of chemistry thrown in for good measure. The site begins with a brief introduction of how to successfully search for such resources using well-known search engines such as Google. The materials are divided into areas that include Books, Lesson Ideas for Science Teachers, and Lesson Ideas for All Disciplines. The Lesson Ideas for Science Teachers area is a great place to start; it contains links to the Eisenhower National Clearin ghouse for Science Education, NASA Educators, and the Mathematics and Science Education Gateway at Cornell. Of course, visitors shouldn't miss the Lesson Ideas for All Disciplines area, which includes links to the award-winning TeachNet site and the PBS TeacherSource site, which brings together audio and video clips. [KMG]


      Sing About Science & Math: Lesson Plans

      http://singaboutscience.org/wp/lesson-plans/

      If you have ever wanted to sing out loud and proud about oceanography, physics, or the natural world, this site is for you. This site is part of the larger Sing About Science & Math website which encourages young people to make a joyous noise about the world of science. This particular section of the site brings together lesson plans designed to encourage participation in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) subjects. Visitors can scan through twenty or so lesson plans here including explorations of an "Ode to the Gaseous State" and a song about DNA sung to the ditty "Row, Row, Row Your Boat". Visitors can scan the items here by grade level and learn about th e people responsible for their creation. Also, one can elect to submit a musical exploration of science for possible inclusion on the site. [KMG]


      The Salt Institute for Documentary Studies

      http://www.salt.edu/

      The Salt Institute for Documentary Studies is based in Portland, Maine and their mission is "to educate and promote documentary storytellers." The Institute was started in 1973 when a high school English teacher named Pamela Wood founded the organization in Kennebunk. Since then, over 700 students from all over the country and the world have attended Salt. First-time visitors should click on the Programs tab to learn about their many creative programs, which include writing, radio, and photography. The "Events & Exhibits" area allows users to learn about their film viewings, galleries, and other activities. Also, visitors should sign up to receive their free newsletter for updates about upcoming events and so on. [KMG]


      Ehon: The Artist and the Book in Japan

      http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/explore/dgexplore.cfm?topic=arts&col_id=443

      New York Public Library presents this enjoyable way to leaf through a selection of Japanese books from the Spencer Collection, that encompasses "300 manuscripts and 1,500 printed books from Japan; the manuscripts range from the 12th to the 20th century, and the printed works from the year 770 to the present". The collection guide points out highlights for those uncertain where to begin in this surfeit of riches. Suggestions include Kitagawa Utamaro's Shiohi no tsuto (Gifts of the Ebb Tide, 1789; referred to in English as "The Shell Book"), considered a masterpiece in the Ehon style. The collect ion guide also directs users to view Kamisaka Sekka's Momoyogusa ("Flowers of a Hundred Worlds", 1910) from the 20th century, in a much more modern style.
      [DS]



      Network Tools

      SmartSettings 1.2

      https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rootuninstaller.settings

      Have you ever wanted to optimize and automate your device settings? Well, this process just got much simpler with this version of SmartSettings. Interested parties can use this tool to schedule meetings, save their battery, and set alarms and updates. This version is compatible with all devices Android 2.1 and newer. [KMG]


      MergePay

      https://mergepay.com/

      At the end of the year, it can be a tremendous hassle to play catch-up with taking care of finances for one's business or personal life. MergePay allows users to track all of their expenses and bills in one handy location. Visitors just need to snap a quick receipt from their iPhone and they can forward their invoices to MergePay for a simple accounting of these items. Also, visitors can use MergePay to create a visual overview of what bills they need to pay during each month. This version is compatible with all operating systems. [KMG]



      In the News

      Despite economic troubles around the world, skyscrapers continue to rise


      Reaching for the sky: streets in the sky
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-20526219

      Skyscraper stories: Reaching for the sky
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-20578262

      London's Walkie-Talkie Skyscraper to be Fuel Cell Powered
      http://www.fuelcelltoday.com/news-events/news-archive/2012/december/london’s-walkie-talkie-skyscraper-to-be-fuel-cell-powered

      Why China's Sky City One is a Bad Idea?
      http://www.businessinsider.com/why-chinas-sky-city-one-is-a-bad-idea-2012-11

      Burlington's Lonely Skyscraper: 83 Years Young
      http://www.thetimesnews.com/news/top-news/burlington-s-lonely-skyscraper-83-years-young-1.58413

      Emporis
      http://www.emporis.com/

      If asked what distinguishes large urban areas from other places of human habitation, many people might mention skyscrapers. For over a century, they have fascinated architects, social theorists, urban planners, and those passing through places like Chicago, Singapore, and London. Despite the continuing global fiscal crisis, these massive symbols of modernity continue to rise across the world at a rapid pace. This year, Europe's tallest building, the Shard, was completed in London and a major public housing complex in Singapore was also finished. These are b! ut two m ajor projects, and other projects of note include China's Sky City One. A Chinese construction company hopes to build the world's tallest skyscraper in Changsha in 90 days. Of course, such an endeavor involves complex logistics and it remains to be seen whether it can be accomplished. Another interesting wrinkle is that they hope to complete the project for $628 million, which is a third of the cost of the Burj Khalifa, which is currently the world's tallest building. [KMG]

      The first link will take interested parties to a great video clip from the BBC that profiles some of these recent skyscraper projects. The second will take visitors to a selection of wonderful "Skyscraper Stories" that look into how a skyscraper is demolished and how skyscraper design has changed in recent years. The third is from Fuel Cell Today that talks about how London's "walkie-talkie" skyscraper will eventually be powered by a 300kW FuelCell Energy carbonate fuel cell. The fourth leads to a bit of commentary from Business Insider about why this proposed Chinese skyscraper might not be such a great idea. The fifth is a great piece from the Times-News about the only skyscraper in Burlington, North Carolina. Finally, the last link will take visitors to the marvelous Emporis website which contains thousands of profiles of tall buildings around the world.





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