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Replacing "ob" for "ka" or "kad"?

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  • csolisr_azk
    Hello again! (Or in LdP, Swaagat! ) I m starting to be interested in your language, and I ve been learning earlier Ido (reformed Esperanto). In LdP, the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 3, 2009
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      Hello again! (Or in LdP, "Swaagat!")

      I'm starting to be interested in your language, and I've been learning earlier Ido (reformed Esperanto). In LdP, the particle for questions is "ob", which as far as I know, comes from Novial, right? Well, what about the Ido's "kad", or "ka"? It also fits nicely with the Japanese question particle, "ka". What do you think about it?
    • lingwadeplaneta
      ... Hola! Swaagat is welcome , hello may be said in different ways, greetings are described here: http://lingwadeplaneta.info/en/anglegram.shtml#int The
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 3, 2009
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        --- In lingwadeplaneta@yahoogroups.com, "csolisr_azk" <csolisr@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello again! (Or in LdP, "Swaagat!")

        Hola!

        "Swaagat" is "welcome", "hello" may be said in different ways, greetings are described here:
        http://lingwadeplaneta.info/en/anglegram.shtml#int

        The most distinctive LdP's hello/goodbye word is "Swasti!" which means roughly "Good luck! May fortune favour you! Everything good to you!"


        > I'm starting to be interested in your language, and I've been learning earlier Ido (reformed Esperanto). In LdP, the particle for questions is "ob", which as far as I know, comes from Novial, right?

        Right!

        >Well, what about the Ido's "kad", or "ka"? It also fits nicely with the Japanese question particle, "ka". What do you think about it?
        >

        The Japanese "ka" stands in the end. But there is Hindi's "kya" ("what") which stands in the beginning and is used as a question particle. So "ka" seems to be a good choice.
        We have also an end question particle "ku". Its use is described here:
        http://lingwadeplaneta.info/en/anglegram.shtml#synt
        In addition I'll say that while "ob" relates to the whole phrase, "ku" may relate to one word, e.g.:
        - Lai ba! (Come!)
        - Me ku mus lai? (Is it me that must come?)

        It's long after midnight here, so I'm not going to produce anything clever right away. Let's live until the morning.

        Nu miti ba manya!
        Hao nocha!

        Dmitri
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