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Re: [lighttrailfood] Re: rice

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  • STONE, J. BRANDON
    Late rice reply (I was in the forest over the weekend): I use instant brown rice from the supermarket all the time. Uncle Ben s or Minute brand, I think. Works
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 31, 1969
      Late rice reply (I was in the forest over the weekend): I use instant
      brown rice from the supermarket all the time. Uncle Ben's or Minute
      brand, I think. Works fine, and I don't really worry about the cost. The
      annual cost differential between one kind of rice and another, for the
      few dozen meals a year that we're talking about, probably wouldn't add up
      to the price of one movie at the mall.

      This stuff is truly useful for backpacking. Just add boiling water and
      let it sit for a few minutes and it's ready.

      There's no magic bullet, nutritionally speaking. No one thing will make
      you or break you. You won't die from eating white rice or white bread or
      potato chips or drinking sodas. Not right away, anyway. But if you make a
      lot of little good decisions over time, I'm betting you'll be better off.
      Whole foods, such as brown rice, are one of those good decisions. You are
      what you eat!

      Brandon in Honolulu
    • grypnytail@aol.com
      So, any rice experts on board? I was looking in the grocery today for backpacking foods. I spent a little time at the rice section. I have begun eating more
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 3, 2000
        So, any rice experts on board?

        I was looking in the grocery today for backpacking foods. I spent a little
        time at the rice section. I have begun eating more rice at home and would
        like to on the trail also. There sure were a lot of varieties. Instant comes
        in regular, premium, and brown. There is also boil in bag, a dozen varieties
        of raw rice, wild rice, etc.

        At home we eat minute rice because my wife doesn't like to cook. I have been
        using this for backpacking cause it's so easy. A book I read claimed minute
        rice was stripped of most of it's nutrients. True? Boil-in-bag takes 10
        minutes. Raw rice takes 10-30 min to cook. I don't like to cook that long on
        the trail, but if the minute rice has less nutrients there is a tradeoff
        between the weight of more fuel or the weight of more rice. I like to make
        wild rice at home but that takes an hour to cook. Occasionally the store has
        a wild rice brand that takes only 20 min. but thats still a long time.

        I bet there are a lot of rice eaters here and I would appreciate your input.
        What do you use?

        Craig
      • brtaylor@telebyte.net
        ... Craig-- first, you are correct that white rice has had almost all of the nutrients stripped off. white rice is what is left after you remove the outter
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 3, 2000
          >So, any rice experts on board?
          >
          >I was looking in the grocery today for backpacking foods. I spent a little
          >time at the rice section. I have begun eating more rice at home and would
          >like to on the trail also. There sure were a lot of varieties. Instant comes
          >in regular, premium, and brown. There is also boil in bag, a dozen varieties
          >of raw rice, wild rice, etc.
          >
          >At home we eat minute rice because my wife doesn't like to cook. I have been
          >using this for backpacking cause it's so easy. A book I read claimed minute
          >rice was stripped of most of it's nutrients. True? Boil-in-bag takes 10
          >minutes. Raw rice takes 10-30 min to cook. I don't like to cook that long on
          >the trail, but if the minute rice has less nutrients there is a tradeoff
          >between the weight of more fuel or the weight of more rice. I like to make
          >wild rice at home but that takes an hour to cook. Occasionally the store has
          >a wild rice brand that takes only 20 min. but thats still a long time.
          >
          >I bet there are a lot of rice eaters here and I would appreciate your input.
          >What do you use?


          Craig--

          first, you are correct that white rice has had almost all of the nutrients
          stripped off. white rice is what is left after you remove the outter shell,
          where most of the nutrients are located.

          cooking; try cooking up the rice for a short bit then putting the whole
          thing into a thermos jug to finish cooking during the day. this of course
          assuems you are willing to haul a thermos bottle around with you on the
          trail.

          others will probably have a better, lighter answer.

          Bob Taylor

          --- "If you build it, they will come."
          / \
          ----------- Bob Taylor Troop, 1590 Committee Chairman
          (| @ @ |) Chief Seattle Council
          | > | WE1-609-97 (A good old Buffalo)
          " \_/ " worked my ticket and always an Eagle!
          """""
          """ brtaylor@... (home)
          webpage: http://pacific.telebyte.com/~brtaylor/
        • Marion Davison
          I have a Harvest Maid dehydrator. I will only eat brown rice because it is more nutritious and full of healthy fiber. Brown rice is very easy to cook in a
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 3, 2000
            I have a Harvest Maid dehydrator. I will only eat brown rice because it is more
            nutritious and full of healthy fiber. Brown rice is very easy to cook in a big
            pot with a lid. Put in several cups of rice, twice as many cups of water, bring
            to a boil, and simmer very low, covered, for one hour. You can combine brown
            rice with whole wheat, whole rye, barley, and millet for an even more tasty and
            nutritious dish. When cooked the rice will be quite dry. There should not be
            any liquid left in the pot. I then spoon it onto the dehydrator trays and dry
            it at 130 degrees until it is very dry. I store it in ziplock bags and add it
            to my backpack dinner recipes. I don't have to cook it, just add boiling water
            and let it stand, covered, to rehydrate it. I combine rice with beans, dried
            fish, dried vegetables, and a variety of soup or spice mixes to make a lot of
            different dinner.
            I have seen minute brown rice in the grocery. I haven't tried it because it's
            expensive. The stuff I make takes a while but it is very cheap, and I take
            great pleasure in preparing meticulously for trips.
            Marion Davison
            grypnytail@... wrote:

            > So, any rice experts on board?
            >
            > I was looking in the grocery today for backpacking foods. I spent a little
            > time at the rice section. I have begun eating more rice at home and would
            > like to on the trail also. There sure were a lot of varieties. Instant comes
            > in regular, premium, and brown. There is also boil in bag, a dozen varieties
            > of raw rice, wild rice, etc.
            >
            > At home we eat minute rice because my wife doesn't like to cook. I have been
            > using this for backpacking cause it's so easy. A book I read claimed minute
            > rice was stripped of most of it's nutrients. True? Boil-in-bag takes 10
            > minutes. Raw rice takes 10-30 min to cook. I don't like to cook that long on
            > the trail, but if the minute rice has less nutrients there is a tradeoff
            > between the weight of more fuel or the weight of more rice. I like to make
            > wild rice at home but that takes an hour to cook. Occasionally the store has
            > a wild rice brand that takes only 20 min. but thats still a long time.
            >
            > I bet there are a lot of rice eaters here and I would appreciate your input.
            > What do you use?
            >
            > Craig
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > lighttrailfood-unsubscribe@egroups.com
          • trailblazer75@aol.com
            You and those who replied already are correct. The milling that removes the brown outer hull removes the bran, germ and many of the nutrients . However,
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 3, 2000
              You and those who replied already are correct.  The milling that removes the
              brown outer hull removes the bran, germ and many of the "nutrients".  
              However, given the small amount of time most of us spend on the trail
              compared to what we spend at home, plus the wide variety of other foods we
              eat on the trail and at home, the loss of the few nutrients is not going to
              affect your health one way or another.  You could easily compensate for it,
              if you felt it was absolutely necessary, by carrying some wheat germ in a
              zip-lock.  A tablespoon a day will provide what you lose in the rice.  OK,
              don't everyone get bent out of shape, it is not an exact replacement, but the
              small difference won't make a difference in health for a few days.  Wheat
              germ is light, requires no cooking, and is healthy.  Minute rice still
              supplies a lot of complex carbohydrates which are an essential ingredient in!
              trail foods.
            • brtaylor@telebyte.net
              ... Dear Trail Blazer thank you for pulling me back into reality on the brown rice issue. unless we are doing extended hiking, this is probably not an issue.
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 4, 2000
                >You and those who replied already are correct. The milling that removes the
                >brown outer hull removes the bran, germ and many of the "nutrients".


                Dear Trail Blazer

                thank you for pulling me back into reality on the brown rice issue. unless
                we are doing extended hiking, this is probably not an issue. doi you have
                any thoughts on where the dividing line is for length of hike, and
                nutrition does become an issue?

                Bob Taylor
                a brown rice fan

                **********************************************************************
                "There are no coincidences, only small miracles." Author Unknown

                Mrs. Rusty Taylor - Poulsbo, WA
                brtaylor@... (home)
                website -- http://pacific.telebyte.com/~brtaylor/
                **********************************************************************
              • Elizabeth A. Foshion
                I hadn t thought about adding wheat germ. Good idea. I find that I do have more energy and verve when eating less processed foods, even on short trips. I
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 4, 2000
                  I hadn't thought about adding wheat germ. Good idea.

                  I find that I do have more energy and "verve" when eating less processed foods, even
                  on short trips. I also don't get as tired of eating the same dish over and over.
                  And, there are fewer painful trips to the shrubs with more fiber in the diet.
                  Oatmeal is where I notice the biggest difference. I never touch the instant stuff
                  now.

                  BTW you can buy instant brown rice in bulk at: http://www.adventurefoods.com/ It's
                  still not cheap at around $8 / lb. A dehydrator quickly pays for itself.

                  Katt

                  trailblazer75@... wrote:

                  > You and those who replied already are correct. The milling that removes the
                  > brown outer hull removes the bran, germ and many of the "nutrients".
                  > However, given the small amount of time most of us spend on the trail
                  > compared to what we spend at home, plus the wide variety of other foods we
                  > eat on the trail and at home, the loss of the few nutrients is not going to
                  > affect your health one way or another. You could easily compensate for it,
                  > if you felt it was absolutely necessary, by carrying some wheat germ in a
                  > zip-lock. A tablespoon a day will provide what you lose in the rice. OK,
                  > don't everyone get bent out of shape, it is not an exact replacement, but the
                  > small difference won't make a difference in health for a few days. Wheat
                  > germ is light, requires no cooking, and is healthy. Minute rice still
                  > supplies a lot of complex carbohydrates which are an essential ingredient in
                  > trail foods.
                • Marion Davison
                  I am the one who advocates eating brown rice and other whole grains on backpack trips, just like I do at home. Pardon me for being somewhat religious about my
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 4, 2000
                    I am the one who advocates eating brown rice and other whole grains on backpack trips, just like I do at home.  Pardon me for being somewhat religious about my eating practices.  (I am a Seventh Day Adventist).  I take a 25 to 35 day trip of some 300 miles every summer, and I am very interested in getting the most bang for my buck nutritionally.  SInce I don't eat meat I look for those essential fatty acids wherever I can get them, as the body can't operate without some fat.  I always lose any excess weight I may have started the trip with, and I come back in the best shape I will be in all year.  I give half the credit to all the rigorous exercise, and the other half to eating well.
                    Marion Davison

                    trailblazer75@... wrote:

                    You and those who replied already are correct.  The milling that removes the
                    brown outer hull removes the bran, germ and many of the "nutrients".
                    However, given the small amount of time most of us spend on the trail
                    compared to what we spend at home, plus the wide variety of other foods we
                    eat on the trail and at home, the loss of the few nutrients is not going to
                    affect your health one way or another.  You could easily compensate for it,
                    if you felt it was absolutely necessary, by carrying some wheat germ in a
                    zip-lock.  A tablespoon a day will provide what you lose in the rice.  OK,
                    don't everyone get bent out of shape, it is not an exact replacement, but the
                    small difference won't make a difference in health for a few days.  Wheat
                    germ is light, requires no cooking, and is healthy.  Minute rice still
                    supplies a lot of complex carbohydrates which are an essential ingredient in!
                    trail foods.

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    lighttrailfood-unsubscribe@egroups.com
                     
                     

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