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Re: how to effect control key functions with software?

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  • foohokok
    Hi, Sorry I had not been more specific. the solution I wish to overcome.. There are lots of good text to speech software out there free or otherwise. Most if
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 31, 2003
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      Hi,

      Sorry I had not been more specific.

      the solution I wish to overcome..

      There are lots of good text to speech software out there free or
      otherwise.
      Most if not all, as far as I know, need one to physically
      highlight the text, copy into memory, and activates the software to
      speak.

      This is ok for normal sighted people. For the blind it is
      impossible to know where to highlight and which sentence to activate.
      Most text2speech softwares load the entire file and one has to
      physically highlight and activate speech.

      I would like to have software to control the text to be read , send
      each line to be highlighted,copy into memory and activates the
      software without physical control. This function should also be very
      useful for those who are not blind, but physically handicapped, as
      well as those who are normal.

      Once we have this ability to replace keystrokes with software
      equivalents, many other useful functions can be achieved besides the
      abovementioned. Its just that i do not know if this is possible with
      qb4.5 or lb. I think it can be done with lower level languages e.g.
      assembler( am not familiar).

      Certain text2speech software requires users to place the entire file
      in a window and it reads the highlighted contents from there.

      If I can overcome this limitation, I do not have to reinvent the
      wheel by creating my own text2speech software(which I am unable to
      anyway:>)) that allows controlled reading without having the
      physically activities.

      Thanks for your responses

      alan





      --- In libertybasic@yahoogroups.com, Chergarj@c... wrote:
      > In a message dated 12/31/2003 8:31:03 PM Pacific Standard Time,
      > tkingston@c... writes:
      > > As a blind computer user I
      > > can tell you that keyboard access is exactly what we want more of
      in
      > > programs rather than a point-and-click interface.
      >
      > Let me try to be thorough in my understanding about this, not
      knowing to what
      > extent you are blind: Can you or have you written anything
      graphical (using
      > graphicbox or graphic box control) using Liberty BASIC? The
      question probably
      > does not make sense, but I ask in case the answer is not what one
      would
      > expect.
      >
      > G C
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tom Kingston
      ... From: ... what ... (using ... probably ... I m totally blind. I haven t had the need to use a graphic box so I haven t studied that
      Message 2 of 8 , Jan 1, 2004
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <Chergarj@...>


        > In a message dated 12/31/2003 8:31:03 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        > tkingston@... writes:
        > > As a blind computer user I
        > > can tell you that keyboard access is exactly what we want more of in
        > > programs rather than a point-and-click interface.
        >
        > Let me try to be thorough in my understanding about this, not knowing to
        what
        > extent you are blind: Can you or have you written anything graphical
        (using
        > graphicbox or graphic box control) using Liberty BASIC? The question
        probably
        > does not make sense, but I ask in case the answer is not what one would
        > expect.
        >
        > G C

        I'm totally blind. I haven't had the need to use a graphic box so I haven't
        studied that portion of LB. But that's not to say it wouldn't be usable. See
        my follow-up reply to the original poster on this topic for a more in depth
        explanation.

        Tom
      • Tom Kingston
        ... From: foohokok ... Hi Alan, Essentially what you re trying to do is reinvent the wheel. The text-to-speech software you refer to is
        Message 3 of 8 , Jan 1, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "foohokok" <foohokok@...>


          > Hi,
          >
          > Sorry I had not been more specific.
          >
          > the solution I wish to overcome..
          >
          > There are lots of good text to speech software out there free or
          > otherwise.
          > Most if not all, as far as I know, need one to physically
          > highlight the text, copy into memory, and activates the software to
          > speak.
          >
          > This is ok for normal sighted people. For the blind it is
          > impossible to know where to highlight and which sentence to activate.
          > Most text2speech softwares load the entire file and one has to
          > physically highlight and activate speech.
          >
          > I would like to have software to control the text to be read , send
          > each line to be highlighted,copy into memory and activates the
          > software without physical control. This function should also be very
          > useful for those who are not blind, but physically handicapped, as
          > well as those who are normal.
          >
          > Once we have this ability to replace keystrokes with software
          > equivalents, many other useful functions can be achieved besides the
          > abovementioned. Its just that i do not know if this is possible with
          > qb4.5 or lb. I think it can be done with lower level languages e.g.
          > assembler( am not familiar).
          >
          > Certain text2speech software requires users to place the entire file
          > in a window and it reads the highlighted contents from there.
          >
          > If I can overcome this limitation, I do not have to reinvent the
          > wheel by creating my own text2speech software(which I am unable to
          > anyway:>)) that allows controlled reading without having the
          > physically activities.
          >
          > Thanks for your responses
          >
          > alan

          Hi Alan,

          Essentially what you're trying to do is reinvent the wheel. The
          text-to-speech software you refer to is not intended for use by blind
          persons. It's just the latest multi-media rave to play around with if you
          want to convert text into an audio format.

          What I use - and what you're looking to create if I understand you - is
          called a screen-reader. It is an amazingly powerful and impressive
          programming feat. It basically amounts to a sub-system which intercepts all
          information going to the video card. From the user's standpoint it's like
          another operating system. I have at my disposal a mind-boggling array of
          powerful features I can use to create speech configurations which will be
          tied to and automatically loaded for each program as well as specific
          functions within programs. I couldn't even begin to list the functionality
          of a screen-reader here. But here's just a quick snapshot to give you an
          idea as well as demonstrate why keyboard control is critical to us.

          While writing this reply I hear each word spoken after I press the spacebar
          or any punctuation, which is also spoken. If I want I can set it to speak
          each letter as I type.

          When I use the keyboard to highlight text with the standard Windows hot-keys
          it voices the text and says: selected. Many people aren't aware of these
          alternative approaches. Basically it amounts to adding SHIFT to the standard
          key combinations in order to highlight. For example, adding SHIFT to the
          cursor arrows highlights the text it moves to; character, word, line. The
          same goes for home, end, PgUp and PgDn, as well as their modifier key
          variations.

          I have a read-to-end hot-key I've assigned so that I can simply hit that
          combination to begin reading a document from the current cursor position.
          ESCAPE stops the process.

          I can create two types of key assignments; hot-keys and cursoring keys. A
          hot-key is to execute a speech function without passing that keyboard input
          onto the active program. Example: Control-Shift-T speaks the title-bar of
          the current application. A cursoring key is used to assign speech functions
          to key-combinations that are used by a program. The most basic example of
          this would be the cursoring keys. Pressing the up arrow is passed to the
          program to move the cursor up one line then my screen-reader kicks in and
          executes the command I've assigned to that key-stroke; speak line. A more
          powerful example would be that when I press Control-P to print something
          this tells my screen-reader to load the configuration file I've created for
          the print menu. Holding down Insert on the numeric entry pad and tapping W
          speaks the currently active window, whatever that may be; a text window, a
          dialog box, etc.

          I also can create 3 types of speak windows; standard, hyperactive, and
          float. A standard window contains a screen area I wish to read either
          automatically or with the press of a hot-key, e.g. Insert-S speaks the
          status line. A hyperactive window monitors a defined location (keeps an eye
          out for whatever I've told it to look for) and reacts in the manner I've
          instructed it to, e.g. read a change in something, see that I've activated a
          particular function and load the configuration file I've designed for it, or
          even voice a message to me. A float window automatically resizes itself
          relative to the way in which I've defined it. I may have a float window
          which always works relative to the cursor position, highlight position, what
          has focus on screen, etc.

          Finally, I actually do have control over the mouse pointer. I've defined
          hot-keys I can use to move about the display reading by line, word, or
          character. I can also jump to the next "clip" item. I can even move by icon
          and label those icons so I'll know what they are, then use my keyboard
          defined mouse keys to click on them. I can even hit my hot-key to move the
          mouse pointer to the top left then use my search key to search for text on
          screen. The mouse pointer will automatically jump to it.

          If you want to get a real feel for such a program just run over to:
          http://www.gwmicro.com and read up on it or download the demo version of
          Window-Eyes. You should be able to access the documentation there as well if
          you just want to blow your mind.

          Hope this was helpful.

          Tom
        • Tom Kingston
          PS. If you re running Windows XP you have a real bare-bones (pretty useless) screen-reader included. It s called: Narrator. It will speak very basic Windows
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 1, 2004
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            PS. If you're running Windows XP you have a real bare-bones (pretty useless)
            screen-reader included. It's called: Narrator. It will speak very basic
            Windows components, such as: the start menu, control-panel, folder views,
            and allow you to operate some utilities. The software speech developed by
            Microsoft is pretty crude but you should be able to understand it;
            especially when you can look at what it's saying. Just click on Start,
            Programs, Accessories, Accessibility, Narrator.

            The software speech included in Window-Eyes, the screen-reader I mentioned,
            is much better. But the best speech resides in dedicated hardware speech
            synthisizers which are essentially a sound-card designed from ground up to
            speak rather than simply play any audio file you throw at it.

            Tom

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Tom Kingston" <tkingston@...>


            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "foohokok" <foohokok@...>
            >
            >
            > > Hi,
            > >
            > > Sorry I had not been more specific.
            > >
            > > the solution I wish to overcome..
            > >
            > > There are lots of good text to speech software out there free or
            > > otherwise.
            > > Most if not all, as far as I know, need one to physically
            > > highlight the text, copy into memory, and activates the software to
            > > speak.
            > >
            > > This is ok for normal sighted people. For the blind it is
            > > impossible to know where to highlight and which sentence to activate.
            > > Most text2speech softwares load the entire file and one has to
            > > physically highlight and activate speech.
            > >
            > > I would like to have software to control the text to be read , send
            > > each line to be highlighted,copy into memory and activates the
            > > software without physical control. This function should also be very
            > > useful for those who are not blind, but physically handicapped, as
            > > well as those who are normal.
            > >
            > > Once we have this ability to replace keystrokes with software
            > > equivalents, many other useful functions can be achieved besides the
            > > abovementioned. Its just that i do not know if this is possible with
            > > qb4.5 or lb. I think it can be done with lower level languages e.g.
            > > assembler( am not familiar).
            > >
            > > Certain text2speech software requires users to place the entire file
            > > in a window and it reads the highlighted contents from there.
            > >
            > > If I can overcome this limitation, I do not have to reinvent the
            > > wheel by creating my own text2speech software(which I am unable to
            > > anyway:>)) that allows controlled reading without having the
            > > physically activities.
            > >
            > > Thanks for your responses
            > >
            > > alan
            >
            > Hi Alan,
            >
            > Essentially what you're trying to do is reinvent the wheel. The
            > text-to-speech software you refer to is not intended for use by blind
            > persons. It's just the latest multi-media rave to play around with if you
            > want to convert text into an audio format.
            >
            > What I use - and what you're looking to create if I understand you - is
            > called a screen-reader. It is an amazingly powerful and impressive
            > programming feat. It basically amounts to a sub-system which intercepts
            all
            > information going to the video card. From the user's standpoint it's like
            > another operating system. I have at my disposal a mind-boggling array of
            > powerful features I can use to create speech configurations which will be
            > tied to and automatically loaded for each program as well as specific
            > functions within programs. I couldn't even begin to list the functionality
            > of a screen-reader here. But here's just a quick snapshot to give you an
            > idea as well as demonstrate why keyboard control is critical to us.
            >
            > While writing this reply I hear each word spoken after I press the
            spacebar
            > or any punctuation, which is also spoken. If I want I can set it to speak
            > each letter as I type.
            >
            > When I use the keyboard to highlight text with the standard Windows
            hot-keys
            > it voices the text and says: selected. Many people aren't aware of these
            > alternative approaches. Basically it amounts to adding SHIFT to the
            standard
            > key combinations in order to highlight. For example, adding SHIFT to the
            > cursor arrows highlights the text it moves to; character, word, line. The
            > same goes for home, end, PgUp and PgDn, as well as their modifier key
            > variations.
            >
            > I have a read-to-end hot-key I've assigned so that I can simply hit that
            > combination to begin reading a document from the current cursor position.
            > ESCAPE stops the process.
            >
            > I can create two types of key assignments; hot-keys and cursoring keys. A
            > hot-key is to execute a speech function without passing that keyboard
            input
            > onto the active program. Example: Control-Shift-T speaks the title-bar of
            > the current application. A cursoring key is used to assign speech
            functions
            > to key-combinations that are used by a program. The most basic example of
            > this would be the cursoring keys. Pressing the up arrow is passed to the
            > program to move the cursor up one line then my screen-reader kicks in and
            > executes the command I've assigned to that key-stroke; speak line. A more
            > powerful example would be that when I press Control-P to print something
            > this tells my screen-reader to load the configuration file I've created
            for
            > the print menu. Holding down Insert on the numeric entry pad and tapping W
            > speaks the currently active window, whatever that may be; a text window, a
            > dialog box, etc.
            >
            > I also can create 3 types of speak windows; standard, hyperactive, and
            > float. A standard window contains a screen area I wish to read either
            > automatically or with the press of a hot-key, e.g. Insert-S speaks the
            > status line. A hyperactive window monitors a defined location (keeps an
            eye
            > out for whatever I've told it to look for) and reacts in the manner I've
            > instructed it to, e.g. read a change in something, see that I've activated
            a
            > particular function and load the configuration file I've designed for it,
            or
            > even voice a message to me. A float window automatically resizes itself
            > relative to the way in which I've defined it. I may have a float window
            > which always works relative to the cursor position, highlight position,
            what
            > has focus on screen, etc.
            >
            > Finally, I actually do have control over the mouse pointer. I've defined
            > hot-keys I can use to move about the display reading by line, word, or
            > character. I can also jump to the next "clip" item. I can even move by
            icon
            > and label those icons so I'll know what they are, then use my keyboard
            > defined mouse keys to click on them. I can even hit my hot-key to move the
            > mouse pointer to the top left then use my search key to search for text on
            > screen. The mouse pointer will automatically jump to it.
            >
            > If you want to get a real feel for such a program just run over to:
            > http://www.gwmicro.com and read up on it or download the demo version of
            > Window-Eyes. You should be able to access the documentation there as well
            if
            > you just want to blow your mind.
            >
            > Hope this was helpful.
            >
            > Tom
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            >
            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/libertybasic/
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > libertybasic-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
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