Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Catching the T into Boston

Expand Messages
  • amcquilk
    Don- While I greatly appreciate Eric s encouragement of public transportation, I also recognize that the bus isn t a solution for everyone, because of the low
    Message 1 of 12 , May 1, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Don-
      While I greatly appreciate Eric's encouragement of public
      transportation, I also recognize that the bus isn't a solution for
      everyone, because of the low frequency, especially if you commute at
      non-peak times, or occasionally have to work at night. If you have
      constraints on your commute, such as the need to pick up kids at
      daycare, it can be problematic.

      I found having a monthly parking pass at Wellington station, in
      Medford, and taking the Orange line in was the most reliable method.
      I always had a parking space, generally traffic wasn't too bad, and I
      didn't have to switch lines at Park Street (a nightmare when there is
      a Red Sox game). Most of the time I took route 128 to 93, but it's
      also possible to weave through Medford and Arlington if there's an
      accident on the highway. Definitely not the shortest route, but it
      was in fact faster and less subject to variation.

      Good luck with the new job!

      -Annie McQuilken

      --- In lexington@yahoogroups.com, "Don Detweiler" <dondet@...> wrote:
      >
      > I'm starting a new job downtown and I will need to commute into the
      > big city for the first time in quite a few years. I used to drive
      > into Cambridge every day, but my new job location is right in the
      > middle of the financial district. Parking at Alewife and taking the
      > Red Line would be fine -- if I arrived at the station before 8am. I
      > hear it typically gets filled by that hour and I don't need to get in
      > to town until 10am. If I get to Alewife and the lot is full, I'm
      > wondering what my alternatives might possibly be.
      >
      > Does anyone know of another parking location in Somerville or
      > Cambridge where I could park and jump on the Red Line at another
      > location (other than Alewife)?
      >
      > Thx. for any help.
      > Don Detweiler
      >
    • krjother
      You could call the 128 BC Shuttle (see http://www.128bc.org/wal-lex/sh_alewife-wal-lex.htm#fares) to inquire about monthly passes for the inbound morning
      Message 2 of 12 , May 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        You could call the 128 BC Shuttle (see
        http://www.128bc.org/wal-lex/sh_alewife-wal-lex.htm#fares) to inquire
        about monthly passes for the inbound morning shuttle which is unlikely
        to be running at capacity at that time.

        Alternatively you could also consider the commuter train from Waltham
        or Belmont.

        Kevin
      • Robert Mela
        I think there s two stations in Winchester -- one downtown, another near where the Aberjona joins the Upper Mystic Lake -- intersection of the parkway and
        Message 3 of 12 , May 1, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          I think there's two stations in Winchester -- one downtown, another near
          where the Aberjona joins the Upper Mystic Lake -- intersection of the
          parkway and Bacon str. You might find more parking there. There's an
          additional station on Rt. 60 in West Medford, but parking doesn't happen.

          From some locations in East Lexington it's <10 minutes to the bus depot
          in Arlington Heights. Enough lines run from there that frequency is not
          a problem.

          For me biking, depending on weather and distance, requires a shower at
          the office. I wore bike clothes in, carried office casual clothes in
          my pack, an showered/changed at the office. I saved about $1400 in
          annual parking expenses, which covered the cost of bike clothes and parts.

          The main incentive was that the 60-70 minutes per day of car time became
          70-75 minutes of bike time, albeit with an additional cost of 15 minutes
          for packing and changing. It was a good deal, esp. since there was no
          other way I could have carved out time for exercise.




          Eric Eid-Reiner wrote:
          > Hello Don and all -
          >
          > Option 4 -
          > You could bike to or get dropped off at the Winchester
          > commuter rail station. I'd imagine their 237 spaces
          > fill up by the time you'd want to go in, but I'm not
          > sure. But they do have 27 bike spaces!
          >
          > Option 5+... -
          > Things that I have forgot to list above. Or
          > combinations of some of the options....
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jccrampton@aol.com
          Fair warning about biking. I used to bike to Cambridge once a week until I got hit by a car and seriously injured (I m fine, but it was quite a scare). It was
          Message 4 of 12 , May 1, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Fair warning about biking. I used to bike to Cambridge once a week until I
            got hit by a car and seriously injured (I'm fine, but it was quite a scare).

            It was 530PM in late spring; clear, light, dry, etc. Perfect road
            conditions. I was in my proper lane, but not in a bike lane. I know and use hand
            signals and ride with reflective vests and, of course, a helmet (which saved my
            life). I got hit from behind by a car whose driver was looking ahead and didn't
            see me.

            As much as I love biking, I have decided to avoid biking to work. Were I to
            move to an office where I could stay on bike paths and in bike lanes the WHOLE
            WAY, I'd change in a heartbeat.


            Jeff


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Eric Eid-Reiner
            Hi all - No doubt that the area and the U.S. needs to be more bike-friendly! People do need to realize that bikes are traffic, too. There should be more bike
            Message 5 of 12 , May 1, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi all -

              No doubt that the area and the U.S. needs to be more
              bike-friendly! People do need to realize that bikes
              are traffic, too. There should be more bike lanes,
              bike paths, and smooth sidewalks and roads. Drivers
              and bicyclists alike need to respect and follow the
              rules of the road. Certainly people pass me waaaay
              too close all the time if I'm biking on the road (even
              if I'm on the inner edge of the 6-inch "bike lane"
              that is often somewhat filled with holes and breaks).
              And it's very frustrating. We would be doing the
              environment, bikers, drivers, the biking industry,
              and, well, everyone a great favor to make things safer
              and friendlier for bikers in the area. While such
              ideas can be somewhat costly and time-consuming, if
              persued overtime and well-planned out, the
              establishment of roads that are safe for people not in
              cars is a noble and important task!

              Ride and drive safely!
              Eric





              --- jccrampton@... wrote:

              > Fair warning about biking. I used to bike to
              > Cambridge once a week until I
              > got hit by a car and seriously injured (I'm fine,
              > but it was quite a scare).
              >
              > It was 530PM in late spring; clear, light, dry, etc.
              > Perfect road
              > conditions. I was in my proper lane, but not in a
              > bike lane. I know and use hand
              > signals and ride with reflective vests and, of
              > course, a helmet (which saved my
              > life). I got hit from behind by a car whose driver
              > was looking ahead and didn't
              > see me.
              >
              > As much as I love biking, I have decided to avoid
              > biking to work. Were I to
              > move to an office where I could stay on bike paths
              > and in bike lanes the WHOLE
              > WAY, I'd change in a heartbeat.
              >
              >
              > Jeff
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >
            • Steve Isenberg
              There is no money in setting up bike lanes, thus I don t think it ll ever happen. They will take space away from the lanes for the big SUV s and trucks, these
              Message 6 of 12 , May 2, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                There is no money in setting up bike lanes, thus I don't think it'll
                ever happen. They will take space away from the lanes for the big
                SUV's and trucks, these make money for Big Business, not bicycles.

                Interesting to note: I find myself driving to Detroit frequently
                (family there). The very worst roads for the entire trip are those I
                find in Michigan, auto capital of USA. Worse roads than in Mass. And
                I've figured out the reason -- bad roads cause those big SUV's,
                trucks, and passenger cars to wear out more quickly. This may be
                their plan -- it results in multiple savings: people have to buy
                vehicles more often and the state doesn't have to shell out money to
                make the roads decent. The best roads I've ever ridden on are in
                Europe -- drove 1000 miles and only saw 1 pothole.

                Sorry, I'm in a skeptical mood this morning...maybe it's the weather?

                By the way, you'll know me, I'm the guy in the Prius who gives you a
                wide berth whenever I pass you on the bike; or running; or walking.
                I'm not the guy who tries to see how close he can get to you. If I do
                need to honk I do it when I'm way behind you (as I don't want to
                startle you). And I know you may want to pull out a bit from the curb
                when the road gets rough on the side -- been there, done that.

                Regards,
                -steve

                On 5/1/06, Eric Eid-Reiner <frisbeeman2001@...> wrote:
                > Hi all -
                >
                > No doubt that the area and the U.S. needs to be more
                > bike-friendly! People do need to realize that bikes
                > are traffic, too. There should be more bike lanes,
                > bike paths, and smooth sidewalks and roads. Drivers
                > and bicyclists alike need to respect and follow the
                > rules of the road. Certainly people pass me waaaay
                > too close all the time if I'm biking on the road (even
                > if I'm on the inner edge of the 6-inch "bike lane"
                > that is often somewhat filled with holes and breaks).
                > And it's very frustrating. We would be doing the
                > environment, bikers, drivers, the biking industry,
                > and, well, everyone a great favor to make things safer
                > and friendlier for bikers in the area. While such
                > ideas can be somewhat costly and time-consuming, if
                > persued overtime and well-planned out, the
                > establishment of roads that are safe for people not in
                > cars is a noble and important task!
                >
                > Ride and drive safely!
                > Eric
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- jccrampton@... wrote:
                >
                > > Fair warning about biking. I used to bike to
                > > Cambridge once a week until I
                > > got hit by a car and seriously injured (I'm fine,
                > > but it was quite a scare).
                > >
                > > It was 530PM in late spring; clear, light, dry, etc.
                > > Perfect road
                > > conditions. I was in my proper lane, but not in a
                > > bike lane. I know and use hand
                > > signals and ride with reflective vests and, of
                > > course, a helmet (which saved my
                > > life). I got hit from behind by a car whose driver
                > > was looking ahead and didn't
                > > see me.
                > >
                > > As much as I love biking, I have decided to avoid
                > > biking to work. Were I to
                > > move to an office where I could stay on bike paths
                > > and in bike lanes the WHOLE
                > > WAY, I'd change in a heartbeat.
                > >
                > >
                > > Jeff
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been
                > > removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Glenn Parker
                ... It has happened in Cambridge, MA, but they re all hippies and commies :) so maybe it s the exception that proves the rule? Anyway, it didn t stop my friend
                Message 7 of 12 , May 2, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Steve Isenberg wrote:
                  > There is no money in setting up bike lanes, thus I don't think it'll
                  > ever happen.

                  It has happened in Cambridge, MA, but they're all hippies and commies :)
                  so maybe it's the exception that proves the rule?

                  Anyway, it didn't stop my friend from getting "doored" in Harvard
                  Square, requiring surgery on his shoulder. He doesn't commute by bike
                  any more.

                  --
                  Glenn Parker | glenn.parker-AT-comcast.net | <http://www.tetrafoil.com/>
                • Laura Dickerson
                  These people market something they call a sports utility bicycle - basically a way to hook up a stable cart behind your bike. It looks like a good idea, but I
                  Message 8 of 12 , May 2, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    These people market something they call a sports utility bicycle -
                    basically a way to hook up a stable cart behind your bike. It looks
                    like a good idea, but I was outraged that the riders on their site
                    aren't wearing helmets. I've written in with a complaint.
                    http://www.xtracycle.com/sub.php
                    Laura Dickerson
                  • amcquilk
                    This gives me a good idea...I have one of those add-a-bike things for my daughter, who has almost outgrown it. I wonder if I could find a way to convert it
                    Message 9 of 12 , May 3, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      This gives me a good idea...I have one of those "add-a-bike" things
                      for my daughter, who has almost outgrown it. I wonder if I could find
                      a way to convert it to haul stuff? We previously had a trailer that
                      was very handy for bike rides to the beach, carrying the cooler and
                      sand chairs, but it took up too much space in the garage. Thanks for
                      sharing this!
                      -Annie



                      --- In lexington@yahoogroups.com, Laura Dickerson <lauradi@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > These people market something they call a sports utility bicycle -
                      > basically a way to hook up a stable cart behind your bike. It looks
                      > like a good idea, but I was outraged that the riders on their site
                      > aren't wearing helmets. I've written in with a complaint.
                      > http://www.xtracycle.com/sub.php
                      > Laura Dickerson
                      >
                    • Robert Mela
                      Beacon/Hampshire is the way to go. Mass Ave stinks, literally and figuratively, on bike. It s all a matter of picking the route. For much of Somerville and
                      Message 10 of 12 , May 4, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Beacon/Hampshire is the way to go.

                        Mass Ave stinks, literally and figuratively, on bike. It's all a matter
                        of picking the route. For much of Somerville and Cambridge weaving
                        through back streets avoids lights and traffic.

                        It takes months or years to refine a route. I've been thinking about
                        mapping these "hidden quiet zones" and posting them.

                        Even so, there are plenty of people for whom I would recommend against
                        bike commuting. I should have stated so in my first posting.

                        For me it helps to keep up with traffic in situations such as mass ave,
                        where the bike lane is too close to parked cars. Hugging the right side
                        of the bumper of a car in front of you keeps you further out from the
                        parked cars. It takes focus and muscle burn. That and other
                        techniques ( using cars as shields in intersections), together with
                        carefully chosen routes, has reduced my risk.

                        For me the remaining risk has to be balanced against risks of diabetes
                        and heart disease. It's an individual decision, part tea-leaf
                        reading, and what's optimal is per individual.


                        Glenn Parker wrote:
                        > Steve Isenberg wrote:
                        >
                        >> There is no money in setting up bike lanes, thus I don't think it'll
                        >> ever happen.
                        >>
                        >
                        > It has happened in Cambridge, MA, but they're all hippies and commies :)
                        > so maybe it's the exception that proves the rule?
                        >
                        > Anyway, it didn't stop my friend from getting "doored" in Harvard
                        > Square, requiring surgery on his shoulder. He doesn't commute by bike
                        > any more.
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.