Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Lexington Unplugged

Expand Messages
  • Hank Manz
    I am somewhat surprised by the naysayers to Lexington Unplugged. It sounds so Lexington that I thought it would be greeted with huzzahs from everybody ...
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      I am somewhat surprised by the naysayers to Lexington Unplugged. It sounds so Lexington that I thought it would be greeted with huzzahs from everybody ...

      There are some local organizations that have these days all the time. No electric lights. No electric stoves. No beds. No central heating. No electronics. Just a little singing and storytelling to pass the time along with some long walks.

      The only difference is that we call them Scout Camping Trips. Boy Scout Troop 160 has just returned from the Klondike Derby near Ayer, MA. Temperatures were almost tropical at 24 degrees. The Scouts cooked all their own food and it was pretty good. The entertainment, even after hearing the same skits for 40 years, was pretty good, too. In just a few weeks we will be headed for Albion, Maine for our annual three day Deep Freeze. Two years ago it was minus 20, but last year we caught a break when it warmed up to minus 15.

      Now here's a chance to get the flavor of all that togetherness and personal interaction and you don't even have to sleep outside or cook your meals in a Dutch oven over charcoal. Unplug and enjoy!

      -Hank Manz



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lorraine Fournier
      Dear Hank and Members I don t see what the point is in everyone being unplugged. If I m unplugged for a day it won t affect what the family down the street
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Hank and Members

        I don't see what the point is in everyone being unplugged. If I'm unplugged
        for a day it won't affect what the family down the street does. This is a
        matter for the individual families, to make arraignments, and set aside time
        for each other.

        I have been there and done that, meaning I had children who played sports,
        worked after school, and were busy during the school year. We did things
        that helped us to share time together.

        1.We never answered calls during dinner. It gave us time to talk and catch
        up on things we normally didn't have time for.

        2. Set a time for dinner when all of us would be home even if it meant
        waiting an hour or so. This worked out well most of the time except when
        meetings and activities overlapped.

        3.Tried to have dinner together without fail on weekends. This was more
        doable than the work week.

        4. Post your schedules where everyone can see them. This will help with
        questions about who is where and what time they will be home.

        Families started to disconnect when the Blue Laws of Massachusetts became
        law. Sunday was not a day to go shopping, play sports, have meetings, etc..
        It was a day of worship, family, and extended families. Today there is no
        time, I would have to agree, for family. It's up to the individual families
        to make the time.

        I don't believe what I do will make a difference for anyone else other than
        my own family.

        So, unplug if you must.

        Lorraine

        >From: Hank Manz <hank_manz@...>
        >To: lexington@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [lexington] Re: Lexington Unplugged
        >Date: Tue, 1 Feb 2005 10:41:43 -0800 (PST)
        >
        >I am somewhat surprised by the naysayers to Lexington Unplugged. It sounds
        >so Lexington that I thought it would be greeted with huzzahs from everybody
        >...
        >
        >There are some local organizations that have these days all the time. No
        >electric lights. No electric stoves. No beds. No central heating. No
        >electronics. Just a little singing and storytelling to pass the time along
        >with some long walks.
        >
        >The only difference is that we call them Scout Camping Trips. Boy Scout
        >Troop 160 has just returned from the Klondike Derby near Ayer, MA.
        >Temperatures were almost tropical at 24 degrees. The Scouts cooked all
        >their own food and it was pretty good. The entertainment, even after
        >hearing the same skits for 40 years, was pretty good, too. In just a few
        >weeks we will be headed for Albion, Maine for our annual three day Deep
        >Freeze. Two years ago it was minus 20, but last year we caught a break
        >when it warmed up to minus 15.
        >
        >Now here's a chance to get the flavor of all that togetherness and personal
        >interaction and you don't even have to sleep outside or cook your meals in
        >a Dutch oven over charcoal. Unplug and enjoy!
        >
        >-Hank Manz
        >
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.