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Re: [lewiscarroll] "Charles Lutwidge" -> "Lewis Carroll"

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  • Adele Cammarata
    Hi Bryan! Ludovicus is Louis/Lewis/Luìs/Luiz/Luigi/Ludwig in Modern European languages More than one name come from the common old French/German roots chlod
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 30, 2003
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      Hi Bryan!
       
      Ludovicus is Louis/Lewis/Luìs/Luiz/Luigi/Ludwig in Modern European languages.
      More than one name come from the common old French/German roots chlod and wich (brilliant warrior). From this root, derived Clodovechus and its abbreviation Clovis. Both names were very popular in medieval France.
      Clodovechus became Ludovicus in Latin, Clovis became Aloisius.
      In Italian, Clodovechus became Clodoveo (not common at all), Ludovicus became Ludovico, Aloisius became Luigi and Alvise (in Venice).
      In English (via French, I suppose) it's both Louis and Lewis. Lutwidge (not Lutdwidge, as I wrote yesterday) may sound like a theme variation.
       
      Moreover, both Carolus and Ludovicus were German derived names (Carolus from karl that is man - that is Andrew!).
       
      (I love name history!!!)
       
      Adele
       
      -------Original Message-------
       
      Date: martedì 29 aprile 2003 20.36.03
      Subject: Re: [lewiscarroll] "Charles Lutwidge" -> "Lewis Carroll"
       


      > Not an anagram.  He translated his given names "Charles Lutwidge"
      > into Latin ("Carolus Ludovicus") and then into English.

      Is it not Charles latinized to Carolus and Lutwidge being German for Louis,
      as I've read elsewhere?

      Bryan

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    • Bryan Talbot
      ... Well, I couldn t imagine a better or more knowledgeable response! Thank you! Bryan _______________________________________________
      Message 2 of 9 , May 1 7:53 AM
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        >
        > Ludovicus is Louis/Lewis/Luìs/Luiz/Luigi/Ludwig in Modern European languages.
        > More than one name come from the common old French/German roots chlod and wich
        > (brilliant warrior). From this root, derived Clodovechus and its abbreviation
        > Clovis. Both names were very popular in medieval France.
        > Clodovechus became Ludovicus in Latin, Clovis became Aloisius.
        > In Italian, Clodovechus became Clodoveo (not common at all), Ludovicus became
        > Ludovico, Aloisius became Luigi and Alvise (in Venice).
        > In English (via French, I suppose) it's both Louis and Lewis. Lutwidge (not
        > Lutdwidge, as I wrote yesterday) may sound like a theme variation.
        >
        > Moreover, both Carolus and Ludovicus were German derived names (Carolus from
        > karl that is man - that is Andrew!).
        >

        Well, I couldn't imagine a better or more knowledgeable response! Thank you!

        Bryan

        _______________________________________________ http://www.bryan-talbot.com

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