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Re: [lewiscarroll] Carroll Trivia

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  • DOYLE60@aol.com
    Carroll was, as we know, very fond of poetry. But which of the following ... And ... Is this really Regis? Not that I would recognize a reference to a
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 10 12:16 PM
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      << >> Carroll was, as we know, very fond of poetry. But which of the
      following
      >> poets does the list feel he most genuinely empathised with?
      >> a) Alfred Lord Tennyson b) Samuel Taylor Coleridge
      >> c) William Blake d) Edward Lear >
      >
      >I'm going to use the 50 - 50 here. "Computer please take away two of the
      >wrong answers leaving one correct answer and one wrong answer."
      >
      >a) b)
      >c) William Blake d) Edward Lear
      >
      >Ah!!!! I was afraid of that. I'm gonna call a friend. "Who?" Joel.
      "And
      >who's Joel." A collector of Alice books and a pretty knowledgeable man on
      >Carroll. "Okay. AT & T would you please get Joel on the line." . . .
      >Rrrrrring . . . . Rrrrrring . . . .
      >
      Is this really Regis? Not that I would recognize a reference to a popular
      mindless TV show. At least not that one. Matt you have gone with your heart
      instead of your head. I already admitted to knowing nothing about poetry.
      That of course will not stop me from answering. If my memory of Carroll
      mythology serves me correctly, there is no evidence that Carroll read Lear?

      Tyger tyger grinning bright. That sounds good. I'll go with Blake. He also
      illustrated his own work. >>

      "Well?"

      I was thinking Lear. He has more similarities to Carroll, obviously. I
      think I'll go with Joel on this one. Yeah, I met him at the last Lewis
      Carroll Society of NA meeting. Seemed to know what he was talking about. So
      C. Blake.

      "Final answer?"

      Yeah.

      "You'rrrrrrrrrrrrrre Right!" . . . "Here is the $200 question."

      Matt

      (Can't believe I wasted two life lines on the $100 Question, and on Carroll
      to boot.)
    • Joel Birenbaum
      ... Is this really Regis? Not that I would recognize a reference to a popular mindless TV show. At least not that one. Matt you have gone with your heart
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 10 12:30 PM
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        At 10:32 PM 7/6/00 -0400, you wrote:
        >> Carroll was, as we know, very fond of poetry. But which of the following
        >> poets does the list feel he most genuinely empathised with?
        >> a) Alfred Lord Tennyson b) Samuel Taylor Coleridge
        >> c) William Blake d) Edward Lear >
        >
        >I'm going to use the 50 - 50 here. "Computer please take away two of the
        >wrong answers leaving one correct answer and one wrong answer."
        >
        >a) b)
        >c) William Blake d) Edward Lear
        >
        >Ah!!!! I was afraid of that. I'm gonna call a friend. "Who?" Joel. "And
        >who's Joel." A collector of Alice books and a pretty knowledgeable man on
        >Carroll. "Okay. AT & T would you please get Joel on the line." . . .
        >Rrrrrring . . . . Rrrrrring . . . .
        >
        Is this really Regis? Not that I would recognize a reference to a popular
        mindless TV show. At least not that one. Matt you have gone with your heart
        instead of your head. I already admitted to knowing nothing about poetry.
        That of course will not stop me from answering. If my memory of Carroll
        mythology serves me correctly, there is no evidence that Carroll read Lear?

        Tyger tyger grinning bright. That sounds good. I'll go with Blake. He also
        illustrated his own work.

        Joel


        >
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      • mikeindex@aol.com
        Hi John. ... Interesting question, John, but what do we mean by empathise?! I don t think there can be any doubt, on the basis of the surviving documentation,
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 13 5:11 AM
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          Hi John.

          > Carroll was, as we know, very fond of poetry. But which of the following
          > poets does the list feel he most genuinely empathised with?

          > a) Alfred Lord Tennyson
          > b) Samuel Taylor Coleridge
          > c) William Blake
          > d) Edward Lear

          Interesting question, John, but what do we mean by empathise?!

          I don't think there can be any doubt, on the basis of the surviving
          documentation, that the poet he most admired and the one he would most have
          liked to be mistaken for was Tennyson. So that's my answer.

          According to the auction catalogues when his estate was sold off, he owned 27
          volumes of Tennyson's poetry, and regularly expressed his admiration for the
          Laureate's work. (Not always unqualified - when 'The Charge of the Light
          Brigade' first came out he pronounced it to be a good imitation of Tennyson's
          style but not good enough to be by the man himself!)

          I have a suspicion that the question-master's 'right' answer is Coleridge,
          but I don't think there's much evidence for what CLD thought of Coleridge's
          poetry as distinct from his philosophical and theological writings (for
          which, as you remarked a while back, STC was better known in his own time).

          Blake CLD is on record as admiring, and he wrote some pretty Blakean verses
          ('Solitude' and to a lesser extent 'Beatrice'), but if imitation is the
          sincerest form of flattery maybe 'The Path of Roses' swings it for Tennyson.

          Lear - no. I know he and CLD are supposed to have been The Two Great
          Nonsense-Writers. But CLD left no recorded comments on Lear and didn't own
          any of his books, and even at 13 was writing better limericks than Lear's. I
          think any apparent kinship between them is a modern perception only; no-one
          in their own time even thought to compare them (I am open to correction here).
          Personally I always thought Lear should have stuck to painting.

          Regards to all

          Mike
        • AnisaT@aol.com
          Hi Mike, Empathise, I thought was the right word for a question that I really don t think has a correct answer (Ido this all the time with my students!).
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 13 5:51 AM
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            Hi Mike,

            Empathise, I thought was the right word for a question that I really don't
            think has a 'correct' answer (Ido this all the time with my students!). Just
            a piece of thought provoking trivia. I think that, in their own ways, Blake,
            Tennyson and Coleridge all profoundly influenced Carroll and their was
            empathy for all three - again in different ways.

            Ready for the next one list?

            John Tufail
          • DOYLE60@aol.com
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 13 6:51 AM
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              << better limericks than Lear's. >>

              I can't stand Lear's limericks. But only because of the form of his
              limericks, that is, the repeat of the first line as the fifth line -- a very
              limiting devise for humor. He did write some "modern" limericks (without the
              repeat) but I'm not sure if they are even better than the old-fashioned ones.

              Matt
            • DOYLE60@aol.com
              Sure. But this isn t trivia. Trivia has an answer. Continue with Discussion of the Week or something of that nature.
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 13 6:53 AM
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                << Ready for the next one list? >>

                Sure. But this isn't trivia. Trivia has an answer. Continue with
                "Discussion of the Week" or something of that nature.

                Matt
              • AnisaT@aol.com
                Matt says, Trivia has an answer (spoilsport). So maybe this is supertrivia - as it had three answers? Despite Matt s pedagogy I ll keep calling it trivia.
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 13 8:42 AM
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                  Matt says, 'Trivia has an answer' (spoilsport). So maybe this is supertrivia
                  - as it had three answers?

                  Despite Matt's pedagogy I'll keep calling it trivia. The problem with
                  Carroll trivia is either that everyone is bound to know the answer - or the
                  'correct' answer will turn out to be 'wrong' anyway.

                  But here's a not too easy one (especially for my US friends - I can be as
                  chauvenistic as the next person).

                  Where in East Yorkshire is there a statue of a white rabbit in a churchyard
                  commemorating Lewis Carroll?

                  Revenge is sweet Matt? Or did I speak too soon?

                  John Tufail
                • mikeindex@aol.com
                  ... churchyard ... I don t know about a statue, but apparently there s a rabbit-shaped dent in a limestone pillar (hence white) in St Mary s Church, Whitby.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 14 11:53 AM
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                    John writes:

                    > But here's a not too easy one (especially for my US friends - I can be as
                    > chauvenistic as the next person).

                    > Where in East Yorkshire is there a statue of a white rabbit in a
                    churchyard
                    > commemorating Lewis Carroll?

                    I don't know about a statue, but apparently there's a rabbit-shaped dent in a
                    limestone pillar (hence white) in St Mary's Church, Whitby. According to an
                    article in Jabberwocky (vol 22, no 3) some people seriously believe this to
                    have inspired the opening of AIW.

                    That's not the right answer, is it.

                    Trivia question for Carroll buffs who are also cricket fans (I know there's
                    at least one besides me on the list):

                    Which future England cricket captain, and the grandfather and father of which
                    other future England cricket captain, did CLD photograph?


                    Mike
                  • AnisaT@aol.com
                    In a message dated 14/07/00 19:56:53 GMT Daylight Time, mikeindex@aol.com writes: Mike writes,
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 14 1:15 PM
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                      In a message dated 14/07/00 19:56:53 GMT Daylight Time, mikeindex@...
                      writes:
                      Mike writes,

                      << I don't know about a statue, but apparently there's a rabbit-shaped dent
                      in a
                      limestone pillar (hence white) in St Mary's Church, Whitby. According to an
                      article in Jabberwocky (vol 22, no 3) some people seriously believe this to
                      have inspired the opening of AIW.

                      That's not the right answer, is it.

                      Right Mike. You're wrong Mike. Strike one to the masked avenger.>>
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