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Which Queen Was It?

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  • knaveofarts
    There is so much to comment about in the Alice books, one scarcely knows where to end. 1. One can compare different passages without much comment, which is
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 6, 2002
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      There is so much to comment about in the Alice books, one
      scarcely knows where to end.

      1. One can compare different passages without much comment, which
      is perhaps the simplest and most reader-friendly.

      2. One can analyze texts to get as much meaning out of them as is
      there, which is a little harder, unless one adds some.

      3. One can develop provocative insights into subject-matter of
      which one knows next-to-nothing, which is embarassing.

      4. One can compare books or authors by common topics and ideas,
      which requires some reading experience.

      5. One can reach out for and grab a lot of different passages and
      put them under a topic, such as "Rebellion Against Formalism"; which
      is hard.


      6. One can do whatever's left.


      We will be doing 3. here.


      Some learned (?) people have proposed that the Alice books have
      something to do with Queen Victoria (1837-1901). I'm not sure if that
      means that Alice's adventures parallel Queen Victoria's life, or that
      Alice is based on Queen Victoria's daughter instead of Alice Liddell,
      or that one of the Queens in the books represents Queen Victoria.

      Does the Queen of Hearts represent Queen Victoria? But my
      dictionary says that Queen Elizabeth, 1596-1662, queen of Frederick V
      of Bohemia, was called the Queen of Hearts.

      The Queen of England I am thinking of was unmarried, but had a
      number of consorts, liked to wear white, perhaps because it stood for
      purity, threw a lot of people who didn't share her religious opinions
      into dungeons and had them tortured to death, and like to shoot
      arrows at helpless animals in her courtyard. Of course, we can't
      judge people in the past from our own perspective; they were fonder
      of torture then. Take Isaac Newton (1642-1727).

      The Queen of Hearts is also a bit intolerant, and constantly
      requiring that annoying persons be beheaded, although it was really
      the King of Hearts who reserved that authority. The Queen of Hearts
      was also cruel to animals. She used live hedgehogs for croquet balls,
      and once tried to behead a cat and a mouse.
    • knaveofarts
      There is so much to comment about in the Alice books, one scarcely knows where to end. 1. One can compare different passages without much comment, which is
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 6, 2002
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        There is so much to comment about in the Alice books, one
        scarcely knows where to end.

        1. One can compare different passages without much comment, which
        is perhaps the simplest and most reader-friendly.

        2. One can analyze texts to get as much meaning out of them as is
        there, which is a little harder, unless one adds some.

        3. One can develop provocative insights into subject-matter of
        which one knows next-to-nothing, which is embarassing.

        4. One can compare books or authors by common topics and ideas,
        which requires some reading experience.

        5. One can reach out for and grab a lot of different passages and
        put them under a topic, such as "Rebellion Against Formalism"; which
        is hard.


        6. One can do whatever's left.


        We will be doing 3. here.


        Some learned (?) people have proposed that the Alice books have
        something to do with Queen Victoria (1837-1901). I'm not sure if that
        means that Alice's adventures parallel Queen Victoria's life, or that
        Alice is based on Queen Victoria's daughter instead of Alice Liddell,
        or that one of the Queens in the books represents Queen Victoria.

        Does the Queen of Hearts represent Queen Victoria? But my
        dictionary says that Queen Elizabeth, 1596-1662, queen of Frederick V
        of Bohemia, was called the Queen of Hearts.

        The Queen of England I am thinking of was unmarried, but had a
        number of consorts, liked to wear white, perhaps because it stood for
        purity, threw a lot of people who didn't share her religious opinions
        into dungeons and had them tortured to death, and like to shoot
        arrows at helpless animals in her courtyard. Of course, we can't
        judge people in the past from our own perspective; they were fonder
        of torture then. Take Isaac Newton (1642-1727).

        The Queen of Hearts is also a bit intolerant, and constantly
        requiring that annoying persons be beheaded, although it was really
        the King of Hearts who reserved that authority. The Queen of Hearts
        was also cruel to animals. She used live hedgehogs for croquet balls,
        and once tried to behead a cat and a mouse.
      • AnisaT@aol.com
        In a message dated 06/07/2002 17:09:36 GMT Daylight Time, greydust2002@yahoo.com writes:
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 6, 2002
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          In a message dated 06/07/2002 17:09:36 GMT Daylight Time,
          greydust2002@... writes:

          <<
          The Queen of England I am thinking of was unmarried, but had a
          number of consorts, liked to wear white, perhaps because it stood for
          purity, threw a lot of people who didn't share her religious opinions
          into dungeons and had them tortured to death, and like to shoot
          arrows at helpless animals in her courtyard. Of course, we can't
          judge people in the past from our own perspective; they were fonder
          of torture then. Take Isaac Newton (1642-1727).
          >>
          This is not only rather amusing (well I think it is anyway), it is also quite
          insightful. There is abundant evidence in Carroll's writing that the
          Elizabethan period held great fascination for him - partly of course because
          it co-incided with the age of Shakespeare, but also because it was a period
          of great religious controversy (and it was , of course, a period that saw the
          original 42 articles of faith (THAT number again!) reduced to 39.

          John Tufail
        • jopieth
          ... for ... opinions ... balls, ... At last (after much shuffling around with adresses etc.) I am back up again with the group. Glory be! I may point at a
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 10, 2002
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            --- In lewiscarroll@y..., "knaveofarts" <greydust2002@y...> wrote:
            > The Queen of England I am thinking of was unmarried, but had a
            > number of consorts, liked to wear white, perhaps because it stood
            for
            > purity, threw a lot of people who didn't share her religious
            opinions
            > into dungeons and had them tortured to death, and like to shoot
            > arrows at helpless animals in her courtyard. Of course, we can't
            > judge people in the past from our own perspective; they were fonder
            > of torture then. Take Isaac Newton (1642-1727).
            >
            > The Queen of Hearts is also a bit intolerant, and constantly
            > requiring that annoying persons be beheaded, although it was really
            > the King of Hearts who reserved that authority. The Queen of Hearts
            > was also cruel to animals. She used live hedgehogs for croquet
            balls,
            > and once tried to behead a cat and a mouse.

            At last (after much shuffling around with adresses etc.) I am back up
            again with the group. Glory be!
            I may point at a rather funny coincidence (or is it not a
            coincidence?).
            Miranda Richardson played both queens: her of Hearts in the 1999-
            movie and Elisabeth in the second Blackadder-series. And how they
            looked like twins!
            Gald to be back,
            Joop Tholenaar
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