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Whiles and All Overs

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  • DOYLE60@aol.com
    Whiles: I guess Carroll simply pluralized a word that doesn t usually get pluralized in that given context just for the amusement of it, because it sounds
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 6, 2002
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      Whiles:
      I guess Carroll simply pluralized a word that doesn't usually get pluralized
      in that given context just for the amusement of it, because it sounds funny.

      All over:
      Us Americans would tend to say "she's cookie dough all over" before "she's
      all over cookie dough." But even the first way is a humorous phrasing to my
      ears. Most would tend to say it plainly, "She has cookie dough all over
      herself." Without the 'herself" it would sound as if she had it all over the
      kitchen.

      Matt
    • markisrael2
      Matt writes: Whiles: I guess Carroll simply pluralized a word that doesn t usually get pluralized in that given context just for the amusement of it, because
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 9, 2002
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        Matt writes: "Whiles: I guess Carroll simply pluralized a word that
        doesn't usually get pluralized in that given context just for the
        amusement of it, because it sounds funny."

        I would have thought that "between whiles" was dialect, but I see
        that Kipling used it as narrator, so apparently it was standard
        English.

        "There was more drama in this abstracted, browpuckered search through
        the tabloid-bottles, with a pause here and there for thought and a
        muttered invocation between whiles. Quinine he had in tablets, and
        dark brown meat-lozenges - beef most probably, but that was not his
        business."
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