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Numerous Numbers in AIW

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  • Jenifer Ransom
    ... Jen
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 5, 2013
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      There are numerous number references in AIW, which I think shows Dodgson's mathematical inclinations.  A friend of mine put together a bunch of them; there is quite a bit of overlap.

      Jen


      THREE / THIRTEEN
       
      Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice's first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas!
      either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them.
       
      First it marked out a race-course, in a sort of circle, (`the exact shape doesn't matter,' it said,) and then all the party were placed along the course, here and there.
      There was no `One, two, three, and away,' but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over.
      However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the Dodo suddenly called out `The race is over!' and they all crowded round it, panting, and asking, `But who has won?'
       
      But I've got to see that the mouse doesn't get out." Only I don't think,' Alice went on, `that they'd let Dinah stop in the house if it began ordering people about like that!'
      By this time she had found her way into a tidy little room with a table in the window, and on it (as she had hoped) a fan and two or three pairs of tiny white kid gloves: she took up the fan and a pair of the gloves, and was just going to leave the room, when her eye fell upon a little bottle that stood near the looking- glass.
      There was no label this time with the words `DRINK ME,' but nevertheless she uncorked it and put it to her lips.
       
      `You are old,' said the youth, `one would hardly suppose That your eye was as steady as ever; Yet you balanced an eel on the end of your nose-- What made you so awfully clever?'
      `I have answered three questions, and that is enough,' Said his father; `don't give yourself airs!
      Do you think I can listen all day to such stuff? Be off, or I'll kick you downstairs!'
       
      `Well, I should like to be a LITTLE larger, sir, if you wouldn't mind,' said Alice: `three inches is such a wretched height to be.'
      `It is a very good height indeed!' said the Caterpillar angrily, rearing itself upright as it spoke (it was exactly three inches high).

      `As if it wasn't trouble enough hatching the eggs,' said the Pigeon; `but I must be on the look-out for serpents night and day!
      Why, I haven't had a wink of sleep these three weeks!'
      `I'm very sorry you've been annoyed,' said Alice, who was beginning to see its meaning.
       

      The door led right into a large kitchen, which was full of smoke from one end to the other: the Duchess was sitting on a three-legged stool in the middle, nursing a baby; the cook was leaning over the fire, stirring a large cauldron which seemed to be full of soup.
       

      `Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse,' thought Alice; `only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind.'
      The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: `No room!
      No room!' they cried out when they saw Alice coming.
       

      `I didn't know it was YOUR table,' said Alice; `it's laid for a great many more than three.'
      `Your hair wants cutting,' said the Hatter.
       
      `And be quick about it,' added the Hatter, `or you'll be asleep again before it's done.'
      `Once upon a time there were three little sisters,' the Dormouse began in a great hurry; `and their names were Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a well--'
      `What did they live on?' said Alice, who always took a great interest in questions of eating and drinking.
       
      However, he consented to go on.
      `And so these three little sisters--they were learning to draw, you know--'
      `What did they draw?' said Alice, quite forgetting her promise.
       

      A large rose-tree stood near the entrance of the garden: the roses growing on it were white, but there were three gardeners at it, busily painting them red.
      Alice thought this a very curious thing, and she went nearer to watch them, and just as she came up to them she heard one of them say, `Look out now, Five!
       
      So you see, Miss, we're doing our best, afore she comes, to--' At this moment Five, who had been anxiously looking across the garden, called out `The Queen!
      The Queen!' and the three gardeners instantly threw themselves flat upon their faces.
      There was a sound of many footsteps, and Alice looked round, eager to see the Queen.
       

      First came ten soldiers carrying clubs; these were all shaped like the three gardeners, oblong and flat, with their hands and feet at the corners: next the ten courtiers; these were ornamented all over with diamonds, and walked two and two, as the soldiers did.
      After these came the royal children; there were ten of them, and the little dears came jumping merrily along hand in hand, in couples: they were all ornamented with hearts.
       

      Alice was rather doubtful whether she ought not to lie down on her face like the three gardeners, but she could not remember every having heard of such a rule at processions; `and besides, what would be the use of a procession,' thought she, `if people had all to lie down upon their faces, so that they couldn't see it?' So she stood still where she was, and waited.
       

      I needn't be afraid of them!'
      `And who are THESE?' said the Queen, pointing to the three gardeners who were lying round the rosetree; for, you see, as they were lying on their faces, and the pattern on their backs was the same as the rest of the pack, she could not tell whether they were gardeners, or soldiers, or courtiers, or three of her own children.
       
       
       
      `Get up!' said the Queen, in a shrill, loud voice, and the three gardeners instantly jumped up, and began bowing to the King, the Queen, the royal children, and everybody else.
       

      `I see!' said the Queen, who had meanwhile been examining the roses.
      `Off with their heads!' and the procession moved on, three of the soldiers remaining behind to execute the unfortunate gardeners, who ran to Alice for protection.
       

      `You shan't be beheaded!' said Alice, and she put them into a large flower-pot that stood near.
      The three soldiers wandered about for a minute or two, looking for them, and then quietly marched off after the others.
       

      Alice thought she might as well go back, and see how the game was going on, as she heard the Queen's voice in the distance, screaming with passion.
      She had already heard her sentence three of the players to be executed for having missed their turns, and she did not like the look of things at all, as the game was in such confusion that she never knew whether it was her turn or not.
      So she went in search of her hedgehog.
       

      The moment Alice appeared, she was appealed to by all three to settle the question, and they repeated their arguments to her, though, as they all spoke at once, she found it very hard indeed to make out exactly what they said.
       
       
       
      `And that's the jury-box,' thought Alice, `and those twelve creatures,' (she was obliged to say `creatures,' you see, because some of them were animals, and some were birds,) `I suppose they are the jurors.' She said this last word two or three times over to herself, being rather proud of it: for she thought, and rightly too, that very few little girls of her age knew the meaning of it at all.
      However, `jury-men' would have done just as well.
       

      On this the White Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet, and then unrolled the parchment scroll, and read as follows:--
      `The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts, All on a summer day: The Knave of Hearts, he stole those tarts, And took them quite away!'
       
      `There's a great deal to come before that!'
      `Call the first witness,' said the King; and the White Rabbit blew three blasts on the trumpet, and called out, `First witness!'
      The first witness was the Hatter.
       

      `Write that down,' the King said to the jury, and the jury eagerly wrote down all three dates on their slates, and then added them up, and reduced the answer to shillings and pence.
       
       
       
      I gave her one, they gave him two, You gave us three or more; They all returned from him to you, Though they were mine before.

      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       

       
      FOUR/14/42
       
      `I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth.
      Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) `--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.)
      Presently she began again.
       
      `You ought to be ashamed of yourself,' said Alice, `a great girl like you,' (she might well say this), `to go on crying in this way!
      Stop this moment, I tell you!' But she went on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until there was a large pool all round her, about four inches deep and reaching half down the hall.
       

      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       
      I'm never sure what I'm going to be, from one minute to another!
      However, I've got back to my right size: the next thing is, to get into that beautiful garden--how IS that to be done, I wonder?' As she said this, she came suddenly upon an open place, with a little house in it about four feet high.
      `Whoever lives there,' thought Alice, `it'll never do to come upon them THIS size: why, I should frighten them out of their wits!' So she began nibbling at the righthand bit again, and did not venture to go near the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches high.
       
      `Just think of what work it would make with the day and night!
      You see the earth takes twenty-four hours to turn round on its axis--'
      `Talking of axes,' said the Duchess, `chop off her head!'
      Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily stirring the soup, and seemed not to be listening, so she went on again: `Twenty-four hours, I THINK; or is it twelve?
      I--'
       

      Alice considered a little, and then said `The fourth.'
      `Two days wrong!' sighed the Hatter.
       
      The Hatter looked at the March Hare, who had followed him into the court, arm-in-arm with the Dormouse.
      `Fourteenth of March, I think it was,' he said.
       

      `I must be getting somewhere near the centre of the earth.
      Let me see: that would be four thousand miles down, I think--' (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) `--yes, that's about the right distance--but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I've got to?' (Alice had no idea what Latitude was, or Longitude either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.)
      Presently she began again.
       
      `You ought to be ashamed of yourself,' said Alice, `a great girl like you,' (she might well say this), `to go on crying in this way!
      Stop this moment, I tell you!' But she went on all the same, shedding gallons of tears, until there was a large pool all round her, about four inches deep and reaching half down the hall.
       

      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       
      I'm never sure what I'm going to be, from one minute to another!
      However, I've got back to my right size: the next thing is, to get into that beautiful garden--how IS that to be done, I wonder?' As she said this, she came suddenly upon an open place, with a little house in it about four feet high.
      `Whoever lives there,' thought Alice, `it'll never do to come upon them THIS size: why, I should frighten them out of their wits!' So she began nibbling at the righthand bit again, and did not venture to go near the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches high.
       
      `Just think of what work it would make with the day and night!
      You see the earth takes twenty-four hours to turn round on its axis--'
      `Talking of axes,' said the Duchess, `chop off her head!'
       
      `Talking of axes,' said the Duchess, `chop off her head!'
      Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily stirring the soup, and seemed not to be listening, so she went on again: `Twenty-four hours, I THINK; or is it twelve?
      I--'
       

      Alice considered a little, and then said `The fourth.'
      `Two days wrong!' sighed the Hatter.
       
      The Hatter looked at the March Hare, who had followed him into the court, arm-in-arm with the Dormouse.
      `Fourteenth of March, I think it was,' he said.
       
       
      At this moment the King, who had been for some time busily writing in his note-book, cackled out `Silence!' and read out from his book, `Rule Forty-two.
      ALL PERSONS MORE THAN A MILE HIGH TO LEAVE THE COURT.'
       
       
       
      FIVE
       
      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       
      A large rose-tree stood near the entrance of the garden: the roses growing on it were white, but there were three gardeners at it, busily painting them red.
      Alice thought this a very curious thing, and she went nearer to watch them, and just as she came up to them she heard one of them say, `Look out now, Five!
      Don't go splashing paint over me like that!'
       
      `I couldn't help it,' said Five, in a sulky tone; `Seven jogged my elbow.'
      On which Seven looked up and said, `That's right, Five!
      Always lay the blame on others!'
       
      `YOU'D better not talk!'said Five.
      `I heard the Queen say only yesterday you deserved to be beheaded!'
       

      `Yes, it IS his business!' said Five, `and I'll tell him--it was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions.'
      Seven flung down his brush, and had just begun `Well, of all the unjust things--' when his eye chanced to fall upon Alice, as she stood watching them, and he checked himself suddenly: the others looked round also, and all of them bowed low.
       
      `Would you tell me,' said Alice, a little timidly, `why you are painting those roses?'
      Five and Seven said nothing, but looked at Two.
      Two began in a low voice, `Why the fact is, you see, Miss, this here ought to have been a RED rose-tree, and we put a white one in by mistake; and if the Queen was to find it out, we should all have our heads cut off, you know.
      So you see, Miss, we're doing our best, afore she comes, to--' At this moment Five, who had been anxiously looking across the garden, called out `The Queen!
      The Queen!' and the three gardeners instantly threw themselves flat upon their faces.
       
       
       
      SIX
       

      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       
      `And ever since that,' the Hatter went on in a mournful tone, `he won't do a thing I ask!
      It's always six o'clock now.'
      A bright idea came into Alice's head.
       

      `Sixteenth,' added the Dormouse.
       

      `That's the most important piece of evidence we've heard yet,' said the King, rubbing his hands; `so now let the jury--'
      `If any one of them can explain it,' said Alice, (she had grown so large in the last few minutes that she wasn't a bit afraid of interrupting him,) `I'll give him sixpence.
      _I_ don't believe there's an atom of meaning in it.'
       

       
      FIFTxxx
       

      either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but at any rate it would not open any of them.
      However, on the second time round, she came upon a low curtain she had not noticed before, and behind it was a little door about fifteen inches high: she tried the little golden key in the lock, and to her great delight it fitted!
       

      `What are you thinking of?'
      `I beg your pardon,' said Alice very humbly: `you had got to the fifth bend, I think?'
      `I had NOT!' cried the Mouse, sharply and very angrily.
       

      `Fifteenth,' said the March Hare.
       
       
      SEVENxxx
       
      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       
      Don't go splashing paint over me like that!'
      `I couldn't help it,' said Five, in a sulky tone; `Seven jogged my elbow.'
      On which Seven looked up and said, `That's right, Five!
      Always lay the blame on others!'
       

      `That's none of YOUR business, Two!' said Seven.
       

      `Yes, it IS his business!' said Five, `and I'll tell him--it was for bringing the cook tulip-roots instead of onions.'
      Seven flung down his brush, and had just begun `Well, of all the unjust things--' when his eye chanced to fall upon Alice, as she stood watching them, and he checked himself suddenly: the others looked round also, and all of them bowed low.
       

      `Would you tell me,' said Alice, a little timidly, `why you are painting those roses?'
      Five and Seven said nothing, but looked at Two.
      Two began in a low voice, `Why the fact is, you see, Miss, this here ought to have been a RED rose-tree, and we put a white one in by mistake; and if the Queen was to find it out, we should all have our heads cut off, you know.
       

       

       NINExxx
       


      Oh dear, what nonsense I'm talking!'
      Just then her head struck against the roof of the hall: in fact she was now more than nine feet high, and she at once took up the little golden key and hurried off to the garden door.
       

      He first idea was that she had somehow fallen into the sea, `and in that case I can go back by railway,' she said to herself.
      (Alice had been to the seaside once in her life, and had come to the general conclusion, that wherever you go to on the English coast you find a number of bathing machines in the sea, some children digging in the sand with wooden spades, then a row of lodging houses, and behind them a railway station.) However, she soon made out that she was in the pool of tears which she had wept when she was nine feet high.
       

      However, I've got back to my right size: the next thing is, to get into that beautiful garden--how IS that to be done, I wonder?' As she said this, she came suddenly upon an open place, with a little house in it about four feet high.
      `Whoever lives there,' thought Alice, `it'll never do to come upon them THIS size: why, I should frighten them out of their wits!' So she began nibbling at the righthand bit again, and did not venture to go near the house till she had brought herself down to nine inches high.
       

      Now, if you only kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock.
      For instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just time to begin lessons: you'd only have to whisper a hint to Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling!
      Half-past one, time for dinner!'
       

      `Ten hours the first day,' said the Mock Turtle: `nine the next, and so on.'
      `What a curious plan!' exclaimed Alice.
       

       
      TEN
       


      `What a curious feeling!' said Alice; `I must be shutting up like a telescope.'
      And so it was indeed: she was now only ten inches high, and her face brightened up at the thought that she was now the right size for going though the little door into that lovely garden.
      First, however, she waited for a few minutes to see if she was going to shrink any further: she felt a little nervous about this; `for it might end, you know,' said Alice to herself, `in my going out altogether, like a candle.
       
      For some minutes it puffed away without speaking, but at last it unfolded its arms, took the hookah out of its mouth again, and said, `So you think you're changed, do you?'
      `I'm afraid I am, sir,' said Alice; `I can't remember things as I used--and I don't keep the same size for ten minutes together!'
      `Can't remember WHAT things?' said the Caterpillar.
       

      First came ten soldiers carrying clubs; these were all shaped like the three gardeners, oblong and flat, with their hands and feet at the corners: next the ten courtiers; these were ornamented all over with diamonds, and walked two and two, as the soldiers did.
      After these came the royal children; there were ten of them, and the little dears came jumping merrily along hand in hand, in couples: they were all ornamented with hearts.
      Next came the guests, mostly Kings and Queens, and among them Alice recognised the White Rabbit: it was talking in a hurried nervous manner, smiling at everything that was said, and went by without noticing her.
       

      `Ten hours the first day,' said the Mock Turtle: `nine the next, and so on.'
      `What a curious plan!' exclaimed Alice.
       
       ELEVEN
       

      This was quite a new idea to Alice, and she thought it over a little before she made her next remark.
      `Then the eleventh day must have been a holiday?'
      `Of course it was,' said the Mock Turtle.
       
       TWELVE

       
      `Talking of axes,' said the Duchess, `chop off her head!'
      Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily stirring the soup, and seemed not to be listening, so she went on again: `Twenty-four hours, I THINK; or is it twelve?
      I--'
       

      `And that's the jury-box,' thought Alice, `and those twelve creatures,' (she was obliged to say `creatures,' you see, because some of them were animals, and some were birds,) `I suppose they are the jurors.' She said this last word two or three times over to herself, being rather proud of it: for she thought, and rightly too, that very few little girls of her age knew the meaning of it at all.
      However, `jury-men' would have done just as well.
       

      The twelve jurors were all writing very busily on slates.
      `What are they doing?' Alice whispered to the Gryphon.
       
      I'll try if I know all the things I used to know.
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
       
       
      `And that's the jury-box,' thought Alice, `and those twelve creatures,' (she was obliged to say `creatures,' you see, because some of them were animals, and some were birds,) `I suppose they are the jurors.' She said this last word two or three times over to herself, being rather proud of it: for she thought, and rightly too, that very few little girls of her age knew the meaning of it at all.
      However, `jury-men' would have done just as well.
       
       TWENTx
       
      Let me see: four times five is twelve, and four times six is thirteen, and four times seven is--oh dear!
      I shall never get to twenty at that rate!
      However, the Multiplication Table doesn't signify: let's try Geography.
       
      `Just think of what work it would make with the day and night!
      You see the earth takes twenty-four hours to turn round on its axis--'
      `Talking of axes,' said the Duchess, `chop off her head!'
       
      Alice glanced rather anxiously at the cook, to see if she meant to take the hint; but the cook was busily stirring the soup, and seemed not to be listening, so she went on again: `Twenty-four hours, I THINK; or is it twelve?
      I--'
       
      `It's a pun!' the King added in an offended tone, and everybody laughed, `Let the jury consider their verdict,' the King said, for about the twentieth time that day.
       

       
             

        
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