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Phlizz

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  • yuvalhol
    Hi! I m a translator, and I m now translating Carroll s Sylvie and Bruno - an impossible task, but an enjoyable one indeed. I m sure I ll have many questions
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 23, 2011
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      Hi! I'm a translator, and I'm now translating Carroll's Sylvie and Bruno - an impossible task, but an enjoyable one indeed.

      I'm sure I'll have many questions in the months to come. Currently I'm trying to understand what is the origin of the word phlizz. Is it one of his utter nonsence words, or does it have a known rationality behind it? I don't want to just leave it as it is - because the word already has a meaning in Hebrew (which is the language I'm translating the book to), and simply because I don't want to miss anything the author had in mind.

      Thanks, and looking forward to your enlightening answers,
      Yuval.
    • Michael Everson
      ... OED says: Etymology: A factitious word introduced by Lewis Carroll (see quots. 18891 and 18892). Perhaps influenced by fizz n. Something apparently
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 23, 2011
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        On 23 Jul 2011, at 20:29, yuvalhol wrote:

        > I'm sure I'll have many questions in the months to come. Currently I'm trying to understand what is the origin of the word phlizz. Is it one of his utter nonsence words, or does it have a known rationality behind it?

        OED says:

        Etymology: A factitious word introduced by Lewis Carroll (see quots. 18891 and 18892).

        Perhaps influenced by fizz n.

        Something apparently existing, or existing in name, but having no real substance; anything without meaning or value; a chimera. (Originally in Carroll's Sylvie and Bruno referring to illusory fruit and flowers, and in one scene an illusory nursemaid.)

        Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com/
      • yuvalhol
        Thank you very much. Your answer has been very informative. Now I have to think how to call it in my translשtion.
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 25, 2011
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          Thank you very much. Your answer has been very informative.
          Now I have to think how to call it in my translשtion.

          --- In lewiscarroll@yahoogroups.com, Michael Everson <everson@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 23 Jul 2011, at 20:29, yuvalhol wrote:
          >
          > > I'm sure I'll have many questions in the months to come. Currently I'm trying to understand what is the origin of the word phlizz. Is it one of his utter nonsence words, or does it have a known rationality behind it?
          >
          > OED says:
          >
          > Etymology: A factitious word introduced by Lewis Carroll (see quots. 18891 and 18892).
          >
          > Perhaps influenced by fizz n.
          >
          > Something apparently existing, or existing in name, but having no real substance; anything without meaning or value; a chimera. (Originally in Carroll's Sylvie and Bruno referring to illusory fruit and flowers, and in one scene an illusory nursemaid.)
          >
          > Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com/
          >
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