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Re: 14-16 March

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  • knaveofarts
    You may be adding this correctly. I just added 14, 15, and 16. I assume we are adding pence. If we add farthings, 45 farthings reduces to 11.25 pence, not
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2010
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          You may be adding this correctly. I just added 14, 15, and 16. I assume we are adding pence. If we add farthings, 45 farthings reduces to 11.25 pence, not quite 1 shilling, which consists of 12 pence. 45 pence reduces to 3 shillings, 9 pence, which does not seem significant, even if 9 + 12 = the no. of the jurors.

         Note that the Hatter gives the first date, which is March 14, and the Dormouse gives March 16th, two days difference. In C7, the Hatter observes that his watch is 2 days wrong. Since the day actually is May 4th, according to Alice, then the Hatter's watch stopped on May 2nd. Similarly, if the date the Dormouse gives, March 16th, is correct, then the Hatter is again two days behind, Mar 14, and two days wrong.

        Possibly Mar 14 was the Passover, as Nisan 14 is always the Passover, and usually in March. Passover begins in the evening, or perhaps at 6 PM, which is when the watch stopped, and the sacred time began. The Hatter, March Hare, and the Dormouse might be said to be 'passing over' the "tea-things" as they got used up, and went on to the next set (although this idea might be an itty-bitty far-fetched). Similarly, there are 4 cups of wine at Passover, taken in turn (I think.)

         From March 16 to May 4 (Alice's birthday) there are, counting inclusively, 50 days, which is the time period until the jewish Pentecost holiday. However, I do not know when the count begins; probably not on the second day of the feast of unleavened bread (I think Mar 15th is the first day

         The above analysis does not necessarily imply that CLD was jewish. I think that christian Easter is close to Passover, which is on different days in the solar calendar, and  may even be on March 14 in certain years; and also that there may  be a christian pentecost period of 50 days. Somebody else probably knows the answers.

        But, to address your question, 'Is the 9th of December significant?' No, it's not my birthday.

       
      --- In lewiscarroll@yahoogroups.com, Michael Everson <everson@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am still in pursuit of this. Here is our text.
      >
      > =====
      > "You ought to have finished," said the King. "When did you begin?"
      >
      > The Hatter looked at the March Hare, who had followed him into the court, arm-in-arm with the Dormouse. "Fourteenth of March, I think it was," he said.
      >
      > "Fifteenth," said the March Hare.
      >
      > "Sixteenth," added the Dormouse.
      >
      > "Write that down," the King said to the jury; and the jury eagerly wrote down all three dates on their slates, and then added them up, and reduced the answer to shillings and pence.
      > =====
      >
      > So, what is it that they wrote down? If you add up
      >
      > 3s 14d
      > 3s 15d
      > 3s 16d you get
      > ______
      > 9s 45d which reduces to 12s 9d (since 45d is 3s 9d).
      >
      > Which in some sense is the 9th of December, I suppose.
      >
      > Is that date significant?

        
      >
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