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The Chess Players Companion

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  • kerry.grover
    Lewis Carroll owned a book called The Chess Players Companion by Howard Staunton which had a chapter on Marked Pawns. Some people think that Alice was a
    Message 1 of 34 , Jun 7, 2008
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      Lewis Carroll owned a book called The Chess Players Companion by Howard
      Staunton which had a chapter on Marked Pawns. Some people think that
      Alice was a marked pawn, who is able to checkmate the Queen on King
      Eight, and it also explains her starting point on Queen Two.
    • Michele@TheRosenbergFamilies.Net
      I recently learned the etymology of the word check mate. It is from the Arabic - sheik or king and met - the Arabic and also the Hebrew word for death.
      Message 34 of 34 , Jun 10, 2008
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        I recently learned the etymology of the word check mate. It is from the
        Arabic - sheik or king and "met" - the Arabic and also the Hebrew word
        for death.

        Michele Rosenberg
        Robert Cubinelli wrote:
        >
        >
        > I've been in the language biz for over 30 years and have been
        > playing chess for over over 30 odd years too. All I can add is that
        > game-wise, through the years 'checkmate' has lost the firts part of the
        > word and many players today use it both ways. Linguistically speaking,
        > the very etymology of the word indicated the possibility of splitting it
        > and using 'mate' alone to say the same thing. so, there you go.
        >
        > Rob
        >
        > */Michael Everson <everson@...>/* wrote:
        >
        > At 23:37 +0200 2008-06-08, Arne Moll wrote:
        > >Well, ask any serious chess player, he'll use the word 'mate' for
        > >sure, not checkmate. Using 'checkmate' is not illegal, and perhaps
        > >not even wrong - it's just a dead giveaway that you don't know what
        > >you're talking about. (By the way, it's the same in Dutch:
        > >'schaakmat' - as opposed to 'mat' - is only used by laymen.)
        >
        > You can assert that this is the case, but I disagree. I learnt chess
        > with the word "checkmate", as well as "check" and "mate". Plenty of
        > people enjoy the game regularly and use the word "checkmate" is a
        > normal word in the language, and properly applied alongside "mate".
        >
        > >It's like saying "Lewis Carroll, the author Alice in Wonderland,
        > >also loved to take drugs": it sounds real sophisticated (and how
        > >many times have we all heard people say this as if they knew what
        > >they were talking about!) but we, the REAL Carroll-fans, we all know
        > >better, don't we?
        >
        > I can't even begin to understand this analogy. It seems quite
        > perverse to me. Don't bother to explain it though.
        > --
        > Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com <http://www.evertype.com/>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > "When the going gets tuff, the tuff get going!"
        >
        >
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