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Re: [lewiscarroll] 'real' or 'dreamlike'? - Miss Jones?

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  • Ruth Berman
    ... he could not terminate it ... because the children wanted to hear more and more of it. And I can t see any reason why that day was anything but pleasant
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 19, 2004
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      "maplejohnsonuk" <maplejohnsonuk@...> wrote:
      > I feel sure that he uses the word 'interminable' in a literal sense ... ie
      he could not terminate it ... because the children wanted to hear more and
      more of it. And I can't see any reason why that day was anything but
      pleasant ... he even described it as 'a very enjoyable expedition'. >

      Yes -- in a way, it's a sort of pun to use the word literally instead of in
      the more common but metaphorical sense. And Carroll did enjoy puns and
      wordplay.

      Ruth Berman
    • Jim Buch
      ... sense ... ie ... more and ... instead of in ... Somewhat later, we have Arthur Conan Doyle stuck with his interminable Sherlock Holmes stories by popular
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 19, 2004
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        --- In lewiscarroll@yahoogroups.com, "Ruth Berman" <berma005@u...> wrote:
        > "maplejohnsonuk" <maplejohnsonuk@y...> wrote:
        > > I feel sure that he uses the word 'interminable' in a literal
        sense ... ie
        > he could not terminate it ... because the children wanted to hear
        more and
        > more of it. And I can't see any reason why that day was anything but
        > pleasant ... he even described it as 'a very enjoyable expedition'. >
        >
        > Yes -- in a way, it's a sort of pun to use the word literally
        instead of in
        > the more common but metaphorical sense. And Carroll did enjoy puns and
        > wordplay.
        >
        > Ruth Berman

        Somewhat later, we have Arthur Conan Doyle stuck with his
        "interminable" Sherlock Holmes stories by popular demand when he
        instead wanted to become a "serious author" in mainstream fiction.

        So, the "interminal" demand of listeners/readers led both Doyle and
        Dodgson to literary works that have lived famously for over a century.
        Probably much longer lasting fame than if they had done "serious stuff".

        With the high demand for his work, how painful could it have been to
        Doyle to write more Holmes stories?

        And Dodgson couldn't resist a second book in the "Alice" series.


        Jim Buch

        Jim

        Jim
      • pleasanceone
        Jim s comment about Charles Dodgson and Conan Doyle wanting to be remembered for their serious work brought to my mind the number of artists in various
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 21, 2004
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          Jim's comment about Charles Dodgson and Conan Doyle wanting to be
          remembered for their "serious" work brought to my mind the number of
          artists in various fields whose remembered works are ones which are
          light hearted, whereas they wished to be remembered for "serious
          work".

          Tchaikovski hated "The Nutcracker", which is perhaps his most
          popular suite; Saint-Saens forbade "Carnival of the Animals" from
          being played in his life time (besides 'The Swan') because he had
          composed the work as a kind of joke. Judy Garland and Julie Andrews
          are best remembered for their "light" roles not their serious ones;
          Spike Milligan and Peter Sellers are remembered for their comic
          endeavours rather than their serious ones.

          It seems to be a common trend amongst artists, authors, musicians
          and actors. None of them wanted to be typecast, yet their names are
          forever linked to their best works. It is as if no one else could
          have written "The Nutcracker", or "Carnival of the Animals"; no one
          else could have been Dorothy Gale or Mary Poppins or the famous
          Eccles. No one else could have written "Alice" but Lewis Carroll, no
          one else could have written Sherlock Holmes but Conan Doyle.

          Its one of those things to ponder I think.

          Cheers
          Deb :)


          > Somewhat later, we have Arthur Conan Doyle stuck with his
          > "interminable" Sherlock Holmes stories by popular demand when he
          > instead wanted to become a "serious author" in mainstream fiction.
          >
          > So, the "interminal" demand of listeners/readers led both Doyle and
          > Dodgson to literary works that have lived famously for over a
          century.
          > Probably much longer lasting fame than if they had done "serious
          stuff".
          >
          > With the high demand for his work, how painful could it have been
          to
          > Doyle to write more Holmes stories?
          >
          > And Dodgson couldn't resist a second book in the "Alice" series.
          >
          >
          > Jim Buch
          >
          > Jim
          >
          > Jim
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