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Re: sheet feed

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  • Cyan Cernwnos
    ... Hey, the guy I worked for never let the gripper bar open on any of our jobs, and ran every job without gauge pins. I thought that was how one s s posed to
    Message 1 of 3 , May 2, 1998
      > There is a way of setting
      >the windmill cam so that the gripper bar does not open to let the envelope
      >drop to the guides (i.e, the gripper bar holds the envelope right through
      >the impression cycle).

      Hey, the guy I worked for never let the gripper bar open on any of
      our jobs, and ran every job without gauge pins. I thought
      that was how one's s'posed to do it.

      Cyan >(:
    • Richard S. Broughton
      ... I suppose it depends on how you like your register. Without dropping to the guides the position of the stock depends entirely on where it is at the moment
      Message 2 of 3 , May 2, 1998
        >> There is a way of setting
        >>the windmill cam so that the gripper bar does not open to let the envelope
        >>drop to the guides (i.e, the gripper bar holds the envelope right through
        >>the impression cycle).
        >
        >Hey, the guy I worked for never let the gripper bar open on any of
        >our jobs, and ran every job without gauge pins. I thought
        >that was how one's s'posed to do it.
        >
        >Cyan >(:

        I suppose it depends on how you like your register. Without dropping to the
        guides the position of the stock depends entirely on where it is at the
        moment the gripper bites. Depending on how the feed board components are
        adjusted, that can vary quite a bit from piece to piece. We did a fair
        amount of two-color job work, and my boss was a stickler for good register,
        so we generally ran to the guides.

        Richard
      • Dan P. Worley
        This has to a humorous response. You do indeed have the choice running a windmill to run on guides or commercial the terms are sort of self explanatory
        Message 3 of 3 , May 2, 1998
          This has to a humorous response. You do indeed have the choice running a
          windmill to run "on guides" or "commercial" the terms are sort of self
          explanatory . As one who runs one every day I can assure you "commercial" is
          a craftsmans choice, made as a last gasp when a job is not laid out properly
          by the powers that be. If insufficient guide and gripper margins have been
          allowed in a preprinted piece or a padded multipart form will feed no other
          way, then commercial is the only way to go. The great thing about a
          windmill is that not only that well cut paper shoved tightly into the side
          standards will give you good registration, though not as good as with lay
          pins but that the whole pile can be shifted very accurately using the head
          plate which can be shifted left or right of center and locked, if the body
          printing is off
          square. The intrinsic design of the windmill limits the sheet it can handle
          to about 18 inches but up to that it is an absolutley unsurpassed press. I
          can not recommend them too highly. A good one is worth what you pay for
          it..absolutley and for life. dan worley
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Cyan Cernwnos <grundhog@...>
          To: LETPRESS@... <LETPRESS@...>
          Date: Saturday, May 02, 1998 8:32 PM
          Subject: Re: sheet feed


          > There is a way of setting
          >the windmill cam so that the gripper bar does not open to let the envelope
          >drop to the guides (i.e, the gripper bar holds the envelope right through
          >the impression cycle).

          Hey, the guy I worked for never let the gripper bar open on any of
          our jobs, and ran every job without gauge pins. I thought
          that was how one's s'posed to do it.

          Cyan >(:
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