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  • Benoit Couture
    Hi Pamela and Andrius, My most intimate moment in which I came to know about my own learning came during a conversation with my eldest son, when he was 3 and
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 2, 2006
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      Hi Pamela and Andrius,
       
      My most intimate moment in which I came to know about my own learning came during a conversation with my eldest son, when he was 3 and half years old.
      I was in the habit of calling him and his younger brother, "little people", quite often.  So one night after getting them toked in, as I was about to shut the door I heard him call for me with a voice of one who needed deep attention. 
      He said: "Are we really little people?"  I smiled and I said: "No, you are big people in a small body.  Me and your mom are here to help you to learn how to grow into the big, healthy body where the big person you are can live more and more; and you also teach us."
      When I said that he went into an immediate drift of intense scrutinizing the meaning of what he just heard.  After about 30 or 45 seconds of deep investigation of his by himself I asked: "So, what do you teach us?"  Without one second of hesitation he came out of his inner zone and blared at me with his eyes and said:  "I'm teaching you to learn!!!"
      I felt myself pushed backward by a sweet wake up call; I wished him good night and closed the door.  I have yet to fully tune into the learning of that one lesson.  Such learning is what I call The Faculty of Living and I hope to find the way to develop this faculty into The  Universe-City, where families can grow to take on their full participation into the true spiritual knowledge management called for by the sanctity of integrity offered by such calling in life as procreativity.
       
      In terms of e-learning and related topics, there is a name that I have come across a lot in the one year around the knowledge managers of the Internet, the name of Etiene Wenger.  Here is an easy to watch video with him and 2 other front line workers of the field.
       
      I look forward to very healthy learning...
      Benoit Couture
       
       


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    • Pamela McLean
      Thank you Benoit for your letter and the video resources you pointed us to. Those videos beautifully extend and explain the kind of learning approach that I
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 2, 2006
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        Thank you Benoit for your letter and the video resources you pointed us
        to. Those videos beautifully extend and explain the kind of learning
        approach that I hope we will have here. The people on the videos were
        all new to me. I enjoyed hearing what they had to say.

        I relate to the ideas on the video from my varied experiences as a
        life-long learner, a parent, a pre-school playgroup supervisor, a
        primary school teacher, an adult trainer, and a bored school pupil and
        student. I feel that all of us who have any experience of parenting, or
        of teaching young children, know that young children are brave
        self-directed learners - they are willing to learn by trial and
        improvement, unashamed of their ignorance, and endlessly learning by
        doing. People don't learn to walk or talk by attending lectures - we get
        in there and give it a go - and we don't give up or feel embarrassed
        when we fall flat on our faces - it's just part of the learning
        experience. It is easy to loose that positive attitude as we go through
        our formal education. Many adults have learnt to be more negative,
        cautious, reluctant or defensive about learning new things, making
        mistakes and showing our ignorance.

        I believe that we should not be ashamed of being ignorant if we have not
        had the opportunity to learn. Different people have different
        opportunities - and develop different areas of knowledge and ignorance.
        It is not a hierarchy where "someone who knows more" about x,y,z, is
        somehow a "better person" than "someone who knows less" about x,y,z, . I
        think we need to try to keep our childlike readiness for experiential
        learning - for practical, public, learning-by-trial-and-improvement -
        even if we do fall flat on our faces from time to time. We should expect
        it and be ready to help each other up.

        Regarding learning, the things I think we should be ashamed of are:
        1 - Being unwilling to share we do know
        2 - Being unwilling to admit what we don't know

        The second is probably worse. It can lead to being dishonest about what
        we know - pretending to know something that we don't.and then having to
        bluff. If we bluff about knowledge to someone who knows less than we do
        - we may change them from someone who knows that they need information
        to someone who is misinformed - and possibly dangerously so.

        By contrast you, and the people on the video, certainly seem to know
        what you are talking about and speak from the heart and with enthusiasm.
        I enjoyed my learning here.

        Pam
      • Benoit Couture
        Pam, Great feedback, thank you. You inspire me to say that genuine learning feeds and feedsback from caring, until the rhythm of exchange carries each one s
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 2, 2006
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          Pam,
           
          Great feedback, thank you. You inspire me to say that genuine learning feeds and feedsback from caring, until the rhythm of exchange carries each one's inner musical note into the intimate harmonies of comfort and security, guiding us through the rocky pathway that leads to the personal and communal melody at the heart of life's struggle that defeats death by its loyalty in the light. 
          Let the dancing sweep us on the ground of perpetual renewal of our service to care as we need to, and as we should, could and can...
           
          Peace,
          Benoit


          Pamela McLean <pam@...> wrote:
          Thank you Benoit for your letter and the video resources  you pointed us
          to. Those videos beautifully extend and explain the kind of learning
          approach that I hope we will have here. The people on the videos were
          all new to me. I enjoyed hearing what they had to say.

          I relate to the ideas on the video from my varied experiences as a
          life-long learner, a parent, a pre-school playgroup supervisor, a
          primary school teacher, an adult trainer, and a bored school pupil and
          student. I feel that all of us who have any experience of parenting, or
          of teaching young children, know that young children are brave
          self-directed learners - they are willing to learn by trial and
          improvement, unashamed of their ignorance, and endlessly learning by
          doing. People don't learn to walk or talk by attending lectures - we get
          in there and give it a go - and we don't give up or feel embarrassed
          when we fall flat on our faces - it's just part of the learning
          experience.  It is easy to loose that positive attitude as we go through
          our formal education. Many adults have learnt to be more negative,
          cautious, reluctant or defensive about learning new things, making
          mistakes and showing our ignorance.

          I believe that we should not be ashamed of being ignorant if we have not
          had the opportunity to learn. Different people have different
          opportunities - and develop different areas of knowledge and ignorance.
          It is not a hierarchy where "someone who knows more" about x,y,z, is
          somehow a "better person" than "someone who knows less" about x,y,z, . I
          think we need to try to keep our childlike readiness for experiential
          learning - for practical, public, learning-by-trial-and-improvement  -
          even if we do fall flat on our faces from time to time. We should expect
          it and be ready to help each other up.

          Regarding learning, the things I think we should be ashamed of are:
          1 - Being unwilling to share we do know
          2 - Being unwilling to admit what we don't know

          The second is probably worse. It can lead to being dishonest about what
          we know - pretending to know something that we don't.and then having to
          bluff. If we bluff about knowledge to someone who knows less than we do
          - we may change them from someone who knows that they need information
          to someone who is misinformed - and possibly dangerously so.

          By contrast you, and the people on the video, certainly seem to know
          what you are talking about and speak from the heart and with enthusiasm.
          I enjoyed my learning here.

          Pam


          Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. PC-to-Phone calls for ridiculously low rates.

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