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Re: [holistichelping] Sam, Benoit, Peter, All: A Holistic View of Sustainability (response to your recent letters)

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  • Benoit Couture
    Dear Janet,   Thanks for the shake up!   Here s a bit of relevant online history to help grasp the situation I m wrote from.   I had never heard of life
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 2, 2009
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      Dear Janet,
       
      Thanks for the shake up!
       
      Here's a bit of relevant online history to help grasp the situation I'm wrote from.
       
      I had never heard of "life long learning" until I read the idea of education from 0 to 40 from Chris Macrae in 2005.
       
      As soon as I read the idea, from my own experience at reaching out to the hard to reach in the underground for nearly 30 years, I thought to myself:
      "What about thinking in terms of extending this idea from minus 40 to + 40 education, so as to open the doors of jails and other such institutions?"
       
      At the time, I had tried for a few years to develop the idea of a venture called Subsense Publishing and Promotion.  That idea had grown from my 30 years spent in the underground, hoping to evntually get on with building the Recovery Road from Self-Destruction to Self-Control to Community Self-Government. 
      It all seemed to fit well with the name of Subsense, so as to serve in that extension from minus 40 to 0.  From that 0, being like the new birth, the educational and social experts could go on with those people to set up the framework to safely move all the way to the 40 of life long learning.
       
      The result being hoped for with the tough love-shake up aproach you use is what this is all about. 
      I never thought at the time that I might find myself aproaching minus 50 as I am at now.
      This is not a view of myself but the reality that I am being given as a feedback by those whom I had been appointed to raise, namely, my own family. 
       
      Everything you wrote about the dying so as to live better and fuller is very central in how I seek to live and it is great to have it confirmed from several different teachings as you wrote. 
       
      I am just not the kind to be kidding myself though, as I hate deceit and denials, which is, I'm afraid, what my wife and children have gotten much too much of out of me, while I was trying to save everyone else, without taking proper care of myself and of them.
       
      I greatly appreciate your taking the time to write as you did and I hope that neither you, nor anyone else will have to do so again for me, but of course, I must also be ready to accept it if need be. 
       
      Thanks for being such a universal "big sister" with such a personal touch, no matter the distance and degree of intimaty, as we never met face to face and yet, I know that I know you and that you know me! 
      However diverse, we are all of the same essence.  I thank God that you are in such fine tuning with your's and that you play out your instrument so well.  It allows me to silence my out of tune noise so that I can adjust to that essence of ours.
       
      Hoping that this was not too confusing.
       
      With love,
      Benoit 


      --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Janet Feldman <kaippg@...> wrote:

      From: Janet Feldman <kaippg@...>
      Subject: [holistichelping] Sam, Benoit, Peter, All: A Holistic View of Sustainability (response to your recent letters)
      To: holistichelping@yahoogroups.com, mendenyo@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 10:46 AM

      Dear All,
       
      Fascinating, thought-provoking, and heart-tugging letters (Sam, Benoit, Peter)...thanks so much for these explorations!
       
      Your letters are, interestingly, on similar themes:  success and failure, teaching and learning, and on "sustainable" ways of addressing challenges, meaning in this case an approach that will be the most healthy, balanced, and holistic over the longer term.
       
      Peter, two of your observations I especially appreciate:
       
      -"I learned something the same when I was growing up ... something along the lines that it was not a disgrace to fail, but a disgrace not to try. Trying and failing is a critical part of learning ... especially
      as a child, but so also during ones whole life."
      -"When there are measures, failure is easy to recognize ... and the reasons can be looked into. When a problem is identified it can be fixed."
       
      The first one is a sustainable approach to living one's life in a balanced and healthy way:  to understand that there will be failures and successes, and even to know that sometimes these will be one and the same (like two sides of the same coin). The latter point because it so much helps to be able to examine a challenge, a "failure", and to see how it might be fixed.
       
      In fact, we need this analytical, examining, "reasoning" approach (related to our thought processes), at the same time that we must deploy the ballast of emotion--in particular those related to hope, faith, compassion, love--to maintain a sense of balance and "humanity" in all of our calculations, plans, and solutions.
       
      This is the holistic and integrative viewpoint upon which my own deepest value of "holistic helping" is based. That is why Peter's last paragraph, outlining what is needed for "intelligent" malaria management, is so pertinent, because it clearly delineates the myriad of "partners" (government, communities, nonprofits) needed for such an effort (especially to have a positive and sustainable effect!), as well as the varied considerations and factors involved, from economics, to access and availability of medicines (the two being tied together), to inclusion and participation as both a "concept" (guiding the work) and a reality.
       
      "Sustainable development" , as it has been conceived by many practitioners, is very much about broad-based partnerships of many sectors and at many levels, and about inclusive and coordinated decision-making. In particular, bringing those for whom the policies and programs are created to the forefront of their formulation and implementation. "Nothing for us, without us"!
       
      As for the concept of "sustainable development" , the term originally referred to development that balances human needs with environmental health. The goal has been to ensure that we as human beings do not despoil the planet for short-term gain, but give it to new generations, as "sound" and whole as it can be (which is a huge challenge, given industrialization, poverty, climate change, and greed).
       
       
      Human beings have always had the view--and the luxury of thinking it--that the earth would simply keep replenishing itself, that it would be there for all time and for all manner of usage.  It has only been recently that we have realized how fragile our environment can be, and how interconnected our whole system is:  people, plants, animals, ocean, soil, atmosphere.
       
      What happens in one place can have reverberations worldwide. Killing off one species can destroy an eco-system, though some species are in turn doing the same (ironically, then, killing--of those species--might be "good" in some respects, even if sad or regrettable in others).
       
      What has evolved over eons of time, and/or has the stamp of the Divine in its design, is now seriously in danger of being compromised to such a degree that the planet might not recover, and succeeding generations will suffer harm that may be irreparable.
       
      Enter "sustainable development" , which is such a wonderful, logical, even "simple" idea, yet it has been born of our failure to practice sustainable policies all along.  This has allowed new ideas to spring up, though, which might have more chance for success. Teaching a person to fish, rather than giving them a fish, is one example.
       
      It turns out that these ideas are also very old, based on earlier traditions for earlier times, when people had to move more in rhythm with the natural world, rather than acting independently of it. This "interconnectivity" is an imperative for us to know, to feel, to understand, and to act upon now (and again!). And that is true not only with regard to our human relationships, but in regard to our relationship with all other life on the planet, and beyond.
       
      So failure and success are so much bound up together, and linked to one another like Yin and Yang, where a bit of one is always in the other, and there is sometimes no clearcut and "for all time" distinguishing between them.
       
      This is also true for our relationship with ourselves:  it is not sustainable- -in a holistic, healthy, gentle, and caring way--to treat ourselves with hatred, loathing, disrespect, derision. It is not a loving approach, that balances our "failures" and "successes" (those terms being relative and even meaningless in some ways, because we can actually succeed in some ways by failing in others!).  It is an approach guaranteed to bring us to the brink, just as our collective development approaches of the past.
       
      If we are "sinners", we are also "angels"...we are not one or the other.
       
      Benoit, when I read your letter, my heart reached out to you, but at the same time, I wanted to shake you up, to give you some "tough love". You are very loving and the soul of support to the rest of us here. But you need to practice being this way with yourself most of all.
       
      We need you over the longer term here, but I fear for you, if you will not take a more kind and gentle course with yourself.  Your view of yourself is not holistic, and therefore not an approach that is sustainable, nor will it sustain you (and the latter is so important!).
       
      The writer, Ernest Hemingway, said something we all should take to heart, especially because it clearly shows how "failure" can be "success".  "Life breaks us all, but those who will NOT break, it kills". Tragically, he could not follow his own best advice, and took his life. But what he said remains so very true:  "brokenness" can be a sacred thing, it can be a wonderful if fearsome teacher, it can be what sustains and saves us.
       
      But instead of thinking of our own "brokenness" as a bad thing, we need to think of it as a good thing, a thing that will help us to grow, a thing that will help us to learn, and also to teach others. The Buddhists believe that "chaos is very good news", for exactly the same reason.
       
      Their approach--the sending out of lovingkindness to the world, the acceptance of suffering without the terrible struggle against it, the lessening of a desire for fulltime "happiness"- -all of these are methods by which you (Benoit) and all of the rest of us might gain more inner peace or quietude, might learn more about peace and love--towards self and others--and might teach the world more about faith and hope.
       
      Jesus, as a human and a spiritual being, was and is about love, peace, hope, faith, and joy. But he did not shy away from the difficulties of life, and he too had doubts about himself--and also about God--along the way. But he transcended them (and in a way himself), and this we all can do (though perhaps not as dramatically: )).
       
      My mother had a wonderful saying, taken from her own religious beliefs:  "God hath not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind".  Power, in this case, not being "power over" someone or something, not being political power, but inner strength, and an ability to empower ourselves, especially through love. Which is truly the only way to develop and maintain a sound mind (and notice that is done through an emotion!).
       
      There is a "sustainability" issue too:  your approach to yourself is not sustainable, by which I mean that you may not be here among us for the longer-term if you cannot turn around your view of yourself, and perhaps of others in your immediate family.
       
      Some of that will involve "letting go" of some things and even of some people (at least the conception we have of them, what we want for them and from them), which--ironically- -is sometimes the only way we can truly hold onto them. This "letting go" is like dying, but within that are the seeds of life too:  Buddhists believe that, if we can practice this small "dying" every day, we will be ready for our final passage from this world, to another life.
       
      We should not try to "cheat" this process by short-circuiting ourselves:  there is growth and spiritual sustenance in the process. And the more we practice this ourselves--given our connection with all other forms of life--the more we can be the change that we want to see in the world, the healthier the planet will be, and the healthier we will be.
       
      There will be many so-called "failures" along the way, but these may and hopefully will birth our greatest personal and collective successes.
       
      So, for Sam, "sustainability" in my view is a great teacher!  The concept as a theory does have its detractors, especially those who say that this approach can't adequately be practiced in a world of such uneven wealth and natural-resource distribution, where so few own so much, and so many have nothing.
       
      You and so many others in rural areas in particular are experiencing the "negative" effects of uneven distribution of wealth, which has come about in large part because of the exploitation of the earth for human gain.
       
      However, it also should be said that poverty in a material way also abounded during the time when people did live more in tune with the natural world, one reason why a new approach to wealth creation and development sprang up in the first place. 
       
      That newer approach--mastery "over" the earth and its resources, also linked to "mastery over" peoples unlike oneself--has now been shown to have its limits, indeed its "failures", along with its successes for some.
       
      There are simply not "successes" enough for billions of others the world over, which is why we now have to rethink development policies and practices again.
       
      And this is where you, Tom, Ken, and others come in:  you may think of yourselves in an "un-powerful" place and situation (ie "what good can I do?", "does it matter what I do?"), but in fact you are in the most powerful--in an "empowering" sense--position on the planet! 
       
      Because it is in places like your own localities, and with people like you, that a deeper form of human development and growth can take place, one that "lifts all boats" (or all ploughs, as the case may be :)), and truly brings the planet to a healthier, better, and more "sustainable" place, both for the immediate term and for successive generations.
       
      So please keep this in mind as you plan your conference, and wonder why it matters. Know that it does matter, far more than you can discern at this time (or perhaps even in your lifetime), and keep going with faith, hope, and love:  for yourselves, your families and communities, your country and continent, for the world, and for what lies way beyond it, both in "sense" (spacetime) and in spirit.
       
      With greatest blessings and lovingkindness to all, Janet

    • Samwel Kongere
      Andrius, I wanted to provoke thinkers and surely i have provoked them. You wanted me to role out what i expect from my London visit. I need support for the
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Andrius,
        I wanted to provoke thinkers and surely i have
        provoked them. You wanted me to role out what i expect
        from my London visit. I need support for the
        consotium, funds and nothing else to tell the people
        truth starting from us.
        I know Tom Ochuka, and Ken Chelimo are feeders to my
        thoughts. The budget is what matters and it starts
        with you guys.
        Lets put our focus together.
        Samwel.
        --- Benoit Couture <benoitctr@...> wrote:

        > Dear Janet,
        >  
        > Thanks for the shake up!
        >  
        > Here's a bit of relevant online history to help
        > grasp the situation I'm wrote from.
        >  
        > I had never heard of "life long learning" until I
        > read the idea of education from 0 to 40 from Chris
        > Macrae in 2005.
        >  
        > As soon as I read the idea, from my own experience
        > at reaching out to the hard to reach in the
        > underground for nearly 30 years, I thought to
        > myself:
        > "What about thinking in terms of extending this idea
        > from minus 40 to + 40 education, so as to open the
        > doors of jails and other such institutions?"
        >  
        > At the time, I had tried for a few years to develop
        > the idea of a venture called Subsense Publishing and
        > Promotion.  That idea had grown from my 30
        > years spent in the underground, hoping to evntually
        > get on with building the Recovery Road from
        > Self-Destruction to Self-Control to Community
        > Self-Government. 
        > It all seemed to fit well with the name of Subsense,
        > so as to serve in that extension from minus 40 to
        > 0.  From that 0, being like the new birth, the
        > educational and social experts could go on with
        > those people to set up the framework to safely
        > move all the way to the 40 of life long learning.
        >  
        > The result being hoped for with the tough love-shake
        > up aproach you use is what this is all about. 
        > I never thought at the time that I might find myself
        > aproaching minus 50 as I am at now.
        > This is not a view of myself but the reality that I
        > am being given as a feedback by those whom I had
        > been appointed to raise, namely, my own family. 
        >  
        > Everything you wrote about the dying so as to live
        > better and fuller is very central in how I seek to
        > live and it is great to have it confirmed from
        > several different teachings as you wrote. 
        >  
        > I am just not the kind to be kidding myself though,
        > as I hate deceit and denials, which is, I'm afraid,
        > what my wife and children have gotten much too much
        > of out of me, while I was trying to save everyone
        > else, without taking proper care of myself and
        > of them.
        >  
        > I greatly appreciate your taking the time to write
        > as you did and I hope that neither you, nor anyone
        > else will have to do so again for me, but of
        > course, I must also be ready to accept it if need
        > be. 
        >  
        > Thanks for being such a universal "big sister" with
        > such a personal touch, no matter the distance and
        > degree of intimaty, as we never met face to face and
        > yet, I know that I know you and that you know me! 
        > However diverse, we are all of the same essence.  I
        > thank God that you are in such fine tuning with
        > your's and that you play out your instrument so
        > well.  It allows me to silence my out of tune noise
        > so that I can adjust to that essence of ours.
        >  
        > Hoping that this was not too confusing.
        >  
        > With love,
        > Benoit 
        >
        >
        > --- On Mon, 3/2/09, Janet Feldman
        > <kaippg@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: Janet Feldman <kaippg@...>
        > Subject: [holistichelping] Sam, Benoit, Peter, All:
        > A Holistic View of Sustainability (response to your
        > recent letters)
        > To: holistichelping@yahoogroups.com,
        > mendenyo@yahoogroups.com
        > Cc: learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Monday, March 2, 2009, 10:46 AM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Dear All,
        >  
        > Fascinating, thought-provoking, and heart-tugging
        > letters (Sam, Benoit, Peter)...thanks so much for
        > these explorations!
        >  
        > Your letters are, interestingly, on similar themes: 
        > success and failure, teaching and learning, and on
        > "sustainable" ways of addressing challenges, meaning
        > in this case an approach that will be the most
        > healthy, balanced, and holistic over the longer
        > term.
        >  
        > Peter, two of your observations I especially
        > appreciate:
        >  
        > -"I learned something the same when I was growing up
        > ... something along the lines that it was not a
        > disgrace to fail, but a disgrace not to try. Trying
        > and failing is a critical part of learning ...
        > especially
        > as a child, but so also during ones whole life."
        >
        > -"When there are measures, failure is easy to
        > recognize ... and the reasons can be looked into.
        > When a problem is identified it can be fixed."
        >  
        > The first one is a sustainable approach to living
        > one's life in a balanced and healthy way:  to
        > understand that there will be failures and
        > successes, and even to know that sometimes these
        > will be one and the same (like two sides of the same
        > coin). The latter point because it so much helps to
        > be able to examine a challenge, a "failure", and to
        > see how it might be fixed.
        >  
        > In fact, we need this analytical, examining,
        > "reasoning" approach (related to our thought
        > processes), at the same time that we must deploy the
        > ballast of emotion--in particular those related to
        > hope, faith, compassion, love--to maintain a sense
        > of balance and "humanity" in all of our
        > calculations, plans, and solutions.
        >  
        > This is the holistic and integrative viewpoint upon
        > which my own deepest value of "holistic helping" is
        > based. That is why Peter's last paragraph, outlining
        > what is needed for "intelligent" malaria management,
        > is so pertinent, because it clearly delineates the
        > myriad of "partners" (government, communities,
        > nonprofits) needed for such an effort (especially to
        > have a positive and sustainable effect!), as well as
        > the varied considerations and factors involved, from
        > economics, to access and availability of medicines
        > (the two being tied together), to inclusion and
        > participation as both a "concept" (guiding the work)
        > and a reality.
        >  
        > "Sustainable development" , as it has been conceived
        > by many practitioners, is very much about
        > broad-based partnerships of many sectors and at many
        > levels, and about inclusive and coordinated
        > decision-making. In particular, bringing those for
        > whom the policies and programs are created to the
        > forefront of their formulation and implementation.
        > "Nothing for us, without us"!
        >  
        > As for the concept of "sustainable development" ,
        > the term originally referred to development that
        > balances human needs with environmental health. The
        > goal has been to ensure that we as human beings do
        > not despoil the planet for short-term gain, but give
        > it to new generations, as "sound" and whole as it
        > can be (which is a huge challenge, given
        > industrialization, poverty, climate change, and
        > greed).
        >  
        > Read more here: http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/
        > Sustainable_ development
        >  
        > Human beings have always had the view--and the
        > luxury of thinking it--that the earth would simply
        > keep replenishing itself, that it would be there for
        > all time and for all manner of usage.  It has only
        > been recently that we have realized how fragile our
        > environment can be, and how interconnected our whole
        > system is:  people, plants, animals, ocean, soil,
        > atmosphere.
        >  
        > What happens in one place can have reverberations
        > worldwide. Killing off one species can destroy an
        > eco-system, though some species are in turn doing
        > the same (ironically, then, killing--of those
        > species--might be "good" in some respects, even if
        > sad or regrettable in others).
        >  
        > What has evolved over eons of time, and/or has the
        > stamp of the Divine in its design, is now seriously
        > in danger of being compromised to such a degree that
        > the planet might not recover, and succeeding
        > generations will suffer harm that may be
        > irreparable.
        >  
        > Enter "sustainable development" , which is such a
        > wonderful, logical, even "simple" idea, yet it has
        > been born of our failure to practice sustainable
        > policies all along.  This has allowed new ideas to
        > spring
        === message truncated ===


        http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=5VvLrzLaXHc0i_2bh5XdOTxA_3d_3d
      • Andrius Kulikauskas
        Samwel, I liked your letter on Sustainability is a poor teacher! I didn t quite understand you. But I think what you meant is that, if things are going well
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 3, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Samwel,

          I liked your letter on "Sustainability is a poor teacher!'' I didn't
          quite understand you. But I think what you meant is that, if things are
          going well for a person, then will they be interested to learn? Are
          Americans or Europeans interested to take big leaps or are they hoping
          to get by with tiny changes? Minciu Sodas is thriving in Africa (thanks
          to your help!) because Africans are willing to participate in entirely
          new approaches. The global economic crisis opens up business opportunity
          for our lab because people may take a fresh look at what we have to
          offer (like global teams or Public Domain learning materials).

          Samwel, I appreciate your leadership and how you've inspired many people
          in our lab, both in Africa and around the world.

          Independent thinkers provoke themselves; dependent thinkers are provoked
          by others. So if you provoke people, then are you fostering dependent
          thinking or independent thinking?!

          Samwel, my question is, how are you provoking yourself? What don't you
          know that you would like to know? What do you want to investigate?

          We then understand you as a leader, somebody who provokes themselves,
          and invites us by their example to provoke ourselves, too.

          Your trip to London is a great investment by our lab, by myself and our
          participants in London. Also, you are representing all of us. It's not
          enough that you benefit, but that you help others benefit, too. Also,
          it's good if your projects might strengthen our lab, where that's possible.

          So please write more: What is it that you don't know that you'd like to
          discover? What would you like to achieve after you have stopped working
          as a community organizer? What would you like to accomplish in London?
          What kind of people would you like to meet there? What would you like to
          achieve in London for other people who you know? What is your plan for
          Mendenyo in the coming year?

          Who are "you guys"? Is that how I treat you? Why should anybody give you
          funds? What are you offering? And is that what we are all about?

          Your answers help me understand that I'm doing the right thing by
          purchasing your ticket to London. I know many good things about your
          work in the past. But please write about your work with me and others in
          the future. What will that mean for you? And what could that mean for
          our lab?

          I can fly you to London or I can save the money. I'd prefer you come!

          If you do come to London, I will need your help, and all of our help, to
          keep our expenses at a minimum, and to be as light a burden as possible
          on all who will help us. We are coming to work. We have very few resources.

          Andrius

          Andrius Kulikauskas
          Minciu Sodas
          ms@...
          http://www.ms.lt


          Samwel Kongere wrote:
          > Andrius,
          > I wanted to provoke thinkers and surely i have
          > provoked them. You wanted me to role out what i expect
          > from my London visit. I need support for the
          > consotium, funds and nothing else to tell the people
          > truth starting from us.
          > I know Tom Ochuka, and Ken Chelimo are feeders to my
          > thoughts. The budget is what matters and it starts
          > with you guys.
          > Lets put our focus together.
          > Samwel.
          > --- Benoit Couture <benoitctr@...> wrote:
          >
          >

          Dear all,

          I am preparing another community focus on Sustainable Local Community
          Responsible Tourism and Agriculture this year (2009), after 2008 on
          Female empowerment on Information Communication Technology and
          Entrepreneurship, I ask myself why? sustainability is a poor teacher? Is
          success a poor teacher? Or which is which?
          We learn about ourselves when we fail. So, do not be afraid of failing.
          Failing is the process of the success. You must have success without
          failing. So; does it mean; unsuccessful people; are people who never
          fail? It is not unemployment which matters, it is about who you are’
          keep striving you will become somebody. Quit and you become
          somebody……but you are the same person again; I think it is all about
          becoming who you are!!!
          My Malaria leader Hibrahim’ usually calls me dog-fool” and encourages me
          to keep on failing and success is at the conner, this to him, these are
          funniest words he remained my mentor. A mentor’ is someone who had done
          what you want to do …….and successful at doing it. Do not find an
          adviser. I think an adviser is someone who tells you how to do it. Most
          of the advisers are selfish, ego-centered people. Be careful of the
          advice you take, you must keep your mind open, always be first aware of
          which advice is coming from where.
          My mentor Andrius, taught me about systems of independent leadership,
          thinking, networking in the public domain. A leader has to be a leader
          of people not a manager of people, why? Managers see their subordinates
          as inferiors. Leaders must direct people, they are smarter. After I
          dropped my predicament on volunteer and enclave of unemployment; began
          researching, networking, contributing my social understanding among
          other independent thinkers (leaders) on Public Domain issues: I found
          out that there were sincerely and diligently building successful
          networks and the globe. When I met these comrades virtually on www.ms.lt
          <http://www.ms.lt/> and discussion groups, I saw impact of independent
          thinking on other people’s lives and financial futures. I began to truly
          appreciate the value of the networking on public domain issues.
          Anywhere, I was learning to overcome my fears of being rejected and
          stopped worrying what other people will say about me.
          To learn to lead people, working with different kinds of people
          Hardest thing about success are those who are actually natural leaders.
          Surely, the ability to get long and inspire is a priceless skill. I
          found out in MS. Lab. I said “skill can be learned”.
          In conclusion, ongoing long term, educational programs, to develop you
          as a human being with self confidence is vital on the right side of
          relevant thinking development of success. I therefore, congratulate the
          leadership intertwined on the: Accessing, Reusing public sector and data
          in Minciu Sodas Lab which will continue to upgrade my social and
          community development background.
          Let us have another thinking day.
          Samwel.
        • Samwel Kongere
          Fine Andrius, I am at a position and have roled out, made many ideas before but taking and using peoples ideas in the public domain is a matter of concern for
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 5, 2009
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            Fine Andrius,
            I am at a position and have roled out, made many ideas
            before but taking and using peoples ideas in the
            public domain is a matter of concern for me and other
            Kenyans and everybody. What i have is at simple stage
            and global stage, i have have a clear focus on
            sustainable local community resposible tourism and
            agriculture, and my thinking can be challenged at a
            level but how can some community focus be misused? I
            am very aware of my endeavours, community and and a
            full plan of what i can achieve, they can achieve? To
            some extent the community as well as me should achieve
            a goal. My last question is are the donors other
            communities in the world understanding our cause,
            needs and ideas and if so or not? How can we change
            our trends? And, if we cannot change them through the
            available media then we better leave working on their
            behalf (community). I can go further if i like, but if
            you allow me let me keep the community peace of
            interests private at cases. I know our needs' i do not
            want to act beyond odds, i have worked in community
            malaria control for nine years but the implementation
            stage is still a dream post. Who will score? The goal
            keeper or the defender, forwarders, or spectators or
            it is a draw? The concept might be same but wordings
            different?
            Samwel.
            --- Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:

            > Samwel,
            >
            > I liked your letter on "Sustainability is a poor
            > teacher!'' I didn't
            > quite understand you. But I think what you meant is
            > that, if things are
            > going well for a person, then will they be
            > interested to learn? Are
            > Americans or Europeans interested to take big leaps
            > or are they hoping
            > to get by with tiny changes? Minciu Sodas is
            > thriving in Africa (thanks
            > to your help!) because Africans are willing to
            > participate in entirely
            > new approaches. The global economic crisis opens up
            > business opportunity
            > for our lab because people may take a fresh look at
            > what we have to
            > offer (like global teams or Public Domain learning
            > materials).
            >
            > Samwel, I appreciate your leadership and how you've
            > inspired many people
            > in our lab, both in Africa and around the world.
            >
            > Independent thinkers provoke themselves; dependent
            > thinkers are provoked
            > by others. So if you provoke people, then are you
            > fostering dependent
            > thinking or independent thinking?!
            >
            > Samwel, my question is, how are you provoking
            > yourself? What don't you
            > know that you would like to know? What do you want
            > to investigate?
            >
            > We then understand you as a leader, somebody who
            > provokes themselves,
            > and invites us by their example to provoke
            > ourselves, too.
            >
            > Your trip to London is a great investment by our
            > lab, by myself and our
            > participants in London. Also, you are representing
            > all of us. It's not
            > enough that you benefit, but that you help others
            > benefit, too. Also,
            > it's good if your projects might strengthen our lab,
            > where that's possible.
            >
            > So please write more: What is it that you don't know
            > that you'd like to
            > discover? What would you like to achieve after you
            > have stopped working
            > as a community organizer? What would you like to
            > accomplish in London?
            > What kind of people would you like to meet there?
            > What would you like to
            > achieve in London for other people who you know?
            > What is your plan for
            > Mendenyo in the coming year?
            >
            > Who are "you guys"? Is that how I treat you? Why
            > should anybody give you
            > funds? What are you offering? And is that what we
            > are all about?
            >
            > Your answers help me understand that I'm doing the
            > right thing by
            > purchasing your ticket to London. I know many good
            > things about your
            > work in the past. But please write about your work
            > with me and others in
            > the future. What will that mean for you? And what
            > could that mean for
            > our lab?
            >
            > I can fly you to London or I can save the money. I'd
            > prefer you come!
            >
            > If you do come to London, I will need your help, and
            > all of our help, to
            > keep our expenses at a minimum, and to be as light a
            > burden as possible
            > on all who will help us. We are coming to work. We
            > have very few resources.
            >
            > Andrius
            >
            > Andrius Kulikauskas
            > Minciu Sodas
            > ms@...
            > http://www.ms.lt
            >
            >
            > Samwel Kongere wrote:
            > > Andrius,
            > > I wanted to provoke thinkers and surely i have
            > > provoked them. You wanted me to role out what i
            > expect
            > > from my London visit. I need support for the
            > > consotium, funds and nothing else to tell the
            > people
            > > truth starting from us.
            > > I know Tom Ochuka, and Ken Chelimo are feeders to
            > my
            > > thoughts. The budget is what matters and it starts
            > > with you guys.
            > > Lets put our focus together.
            > > Samwel.
            > > --- Benoit Couture <benoitctr@...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            >
            > Dear all,
            >
            > I am preparing another community focus on
            > Sustainable Local Community
            > Responsible Tourism and Agriculture this year
            > (2009), after 2008 on
            > Female empowerment on Information Communication
            > Technology and
            > Entrepreneurship, I ask myself why? sustainability
            > is a poor teacher? Is
            > success a poor teacher? Or which is which?
            > We learn about ourselves when we fail. So, do not be
            > afraid of failing.
            > Failing is the process of the success. You must have
            > success without
            > failing. So; does it mean; unsuccessful people; are
            > people who never
            > fail? It is not unemployment which matters, it is
            > about who you are
            > keep striving you will become somebody. Quit and you
            > become
            > somebodybut you are the same person again; I think
            > it is all about
            > becoming who you are!!!
            > My Malaria leader Hibrahim usually calls me
            > dog-fool and encourages me
            > to keep on failing and success is at the conner,
            > this to him, these are
            > funniest words he remained my mentor. A mentor is
            > someone who had done
            > what you want to do .and successful at doing it.
            > Do not find an
            > adviser. I think an adviser is someone who tells you
            > how to do it. Most
            > of the advisers are selfish, ego-centered people. Be
            > careful of the
            > advice you take, you must keep your mind open,
            > always be first aware of
            > which advice is coming from where.
            > My mentor Andrius, taught me about systems of
            > independent leadership,
            > thinking, networking in the public domain. A leader
            > has to be a leader
            > of people not a manager of people, why? Managers see
            > their subordinates
            > as inferiors. Leaders must direct people, they are
            > smarter. After I
            > dropped my predicament on volunteer and enclave of
            > unemployment; began
            > researching, networking, contributing my social
            > understanding among
            > other independent thinkers (leaders) on Public
            > Domain issues: I found
            > out that there were sincerely and diligently
            > building successful
            > networks and the globe. When I met these comrades
            > virtually on www.ms.lt
            > <http://www.ms.lt/> and discussion groups, I saw
            > impact of independent
            > thinking on other peoples lives and financial
            > futures. I began to truly
            > appreciate the value of the networking on public
            > domain issues.
            > Anywhere, I was learning to overcome my fears of
            > being rejected and
            > stopped worrying what other people will say about
            > me.
            > To learn to lead people, working with different
            > kinds of people
            > Hardest thing about success are those who are
            > actually natural leaders.
            > Surely, the ability to get long and inspire is a
            > priceless skill. I
            > found out in MS. Lab. I said skill can be learned.
            > In conclusion, ongoing long term, educational
            > programs, to develop you
            > as a human being with self confidence is vital on
            > the right side of
            > relevant thinking development of success. I
            > therefore, congratulate the
            > leadership intertwined on the: Accessing, Reusing
            > public sector and data
            > in Minciu Sodas Lab which will continue to upgrade
            > my social and
            > community development background.
            > Let us have another thinking day.
            > Samwel.
            >
            === message truncated ===


            http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=5VvLrzLaXHc0i_2bh5XdOTxA_3d_3d
          • David mutua
            Dear All, Trust this finds all well, first, apologies for the long silence, as most of know that have had started the journey of a married life that has
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 6, 2009
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              Dear All,
              Trust this finds all well, first, apologies for the long silence, as most of know that have had started the journey of a married life that has diverted some of my energies and participation in discussions and activities, i again announce that i am moving to the US to be with my wife and build our family there. While there i hope to continue exploring opportunities that can be shared back home - Kenya through the Center for African Learning and Development which from this week our future activities will be coordinated by Charles Walunywa as the Programmes Director, Charles is one of the Trustees and a former VSO volunteer in Nigeria.Other trustees will keep on supporting our work on their capacity.

              Regards,

              David N. Mutua
              Programme Director
              Centre for African Learning and Development (CALD) - Kenya
              Returned VSO Volunteer.
              Independent ICT4D and Education Researcher and Practitioner.
              Tel: +254 720 462 559
              E-mail: davenzainga@... or davenzainga@...


            • kayiwa fred
              God Bless you David I have strong heart for you ... From: David mutua Subject: [learningfromeachother] Re:Moving to the USA To:
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 6, 2009
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                God Bless you David
                I have strong heart for you

                --- On Fri, 3/6/09, David mutua <davenzainga@...> wrote:

                From: David mutua <davenzainga@...>
                Subject: [learningfromeachother] Re:Moving to the USA
                To: learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: "Charles Walunywa" <cwalunywa@...>
                Date: Friday, March 6, 2009, 4:52 AM

                Dear All,
                Trust this finds all well, first, apologies for the long silence, as most of know that have had started the journey of a married life that has diverted some of my energies and participation in discussions and activities, i again announce that i am moving to the US to be with my wife and build our family there. While there i hope to continue exploring opportunities that can be shared back home - Kenya through the Center for African Learning and Development which from this week our future activities will be coordinated by Charles Walunywa as the Programmes Director, Charles is one of the Trustees and a former VSO volunteer in Nigeria.Other trustees will keep on supporting our work on their capacity.

                Regards,

                David N. Mutua
                Programme Director
                Centre for African Learning and Development (CALD) - Kenya
                Returned VSO Volunteer.
                Independent ICT4D and Education Researcher and Practitioner.
                Tel: +254 720 462 559
                E-mail: davenzainga@ yahoo.com or davenzainga@ gmail.com



              • mercy Isaac
                Congratulations David. Mercy Isaac, Programmes support Officer, HIV/AIDS Fantsuam foundation Nigeria - West Africa. ... From: David mutua
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 7, 2009
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                  Congratulations David.

                  Mercy Isaac,
                  Programmes support Officer,
                  HIV/AIDS
                  Fantsuam foundation
                  Nigeria - West Africa.

                  --- On Fri, 3/6/09, David mutua <davenzainga@...> wrote:
                  From: David mutua <davenzainga@...>
                  Subject: [learningfromeachother] Re:Moving to the USA
                  To: learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: "Charles Walunywa" <cwalunywa@...>
                  Date: Friday, March 6, 2009, 4:52 AM

                  Dear All,
                  Trust this finds all well, first, apologies for the long silence, as most of know that have had started the journey of a married life that has diverted some of my energies and participation in discussions and activities, i again announce that i am moving to the US to be with my wife and build our family there. While there i hope to continue exploring opportunities that can be shared back home - Kenya through the Center for African Learning and Development which from this week our future activities will be coordinated by Charles Walunywa as the Programmes Director, Charles is one of the Trustees and a former VSO volunteer in Nigeria.Other trustees will keep on supporting our work on their capacity.

                  Regards,

                  David N. Mutua
                  Programme Director
                  Centre for African Learning and Development (CALD) - Kenya
                  Returned VSO Volunteer.
                  Independent ICT4D and Education Researcher and Practitioner.
                  Tel: +254 720 462 559
                  E-mail: davenzainga@ yahoo.com or davenzainga@ gmail.com



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