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Six principles of constructive design

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  • ms@auste.elnet.lt
    Markus Petz, Thank you for these six principles for educational systems. Andrius ... Dante old does not mean its bad. This seems to link with Pattern languages
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 19, 2006
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      Markus Petz, Thank you for these six principles for educational systems.
      Andrius
      ------------------

      Dante old does not mean its bad.

      This seems to link with Pattern languages in a way.

      markus
      i will write no more here on this email
      --- Dante-Gabryell Monson <dante.monson@...>
      schrieb:

      > > I paste this on the wiki -
      > > http://www.oikoumene.be/knowledgebuilding
      > >
      > >
      > > what follows dates back to 1994, but still
      > > interesting / + followed by text
      > > of applied experience on
      > >
      > > http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/publications/cdgcs.html
      > >
      > >
      > > << Several proposals have appeared recently arguing
      > > that the design of
      > > educational systems should take a constructivist
      > > rather than an
      > > instructional approach (e.g., Bednar, Cunningham,
      > > Duffy, and Perry, 1991;
      > > Harel and Papert, 1991; Newman, Griffin and Cole,
      > > 1989). However, while
      > > there are established, integrative frameworks for
      > > guiding the design of
      > > instructional systems (e.g., Gagne, Briggs and
      > > Wager, 1992; Reigeluth, 1983;
      > > Romiszowski, 198i), there does not appear to be an
      > > integrated framework for
      > > guiding the design of constructivist educational
      > > systems. We take a first
      > > step in this direction by proposing six interrelated
      > > principles for
      > > constructivist design. Versions of the individual
      > > principles have appeared
      > > in a variety of places, but we have tried to
      > > formulate them in such a way
      > > that they work together.
      > >
      > >
      > > The *six principles of constructive design* that we
      > > propose and their
      > > sources are:
      > >
      > > 1. Set the stage but have the *students generate the
      > > knowledge *for
      > > themselves as much as possible (Jacoby, 1978; Black,
      > > Carroll and McGuigan,
      > > 1987)
      > >
      > > 2. Anchor the knowledge in *authentic situations
      > > *and activities (Cognition
      > > and Technology Group at Vanderbilt, 1990)
      > >
      > > 3. Use the *cognitive apprenticeship *methods of
      > > modeling, scaffolding,
      > > fading and coaching to convey how to construct
      > > knowledge in authentic
      > > situations and activates (Collins, Brown and Newman,
      > > 1990)
      > >
      > > 4. Situate knowledge in *multiple contexts *to
      > > prepare for appropriate
      > > transfer to new contexts (Gick and Holyoak, 1983)
      > >
      > > 5. Create *cognitive flexibility* by ensuring that
      > > all knowledge is seen
      > > from multiple perspectives (Spiro, Feltovich,
      > > Jacobson and Coulson, 1991)
      > >
      > > 6. Have the *students collaborate *in knowledge
      > > construction (Johnson and
      > > Johnson, 1975) >>
    • Pamela McLean
      ... By training I am a primary schools teacher. When I trained - back in the 1970s - we wrote essays with titles like The child is the agent of his own
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 21, 2006
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        ms@... wrote:

        >Markus Petz, Thank you for these six principles for educational systems.
        >
        By training I am a primary schools teacher. When I trained - back in the
        1970s - we wrote essays with titles like "The child is the agent of his
        own learning" - and the emphasis was on project based learning, first
        hand experience, and generally "learning by doing". What I read about
        constructive design it seems to be pretty much the same thing - but
        expressed in different jaron and for more advanced learners.

        Don't we all do better teaching and learning things that have interest?
        When I was first teaching we did not have a national curriculum. We were
        free to study what we fancied in our classrooms . (Of course whatever we
        did focus on we'd be talking about it, finding out about it, writing
        about it -building all the skills that mattered). Although I used to
        drive to school with a plan in my head for what we would be focussing on
        - it was only for use if the chidren didn't come up with something
        better. I remember one little girl bringing in a plaster cast that her
        dog had been wearing on its broken leg. That led us in all kind of
        directions, including finding out about our own skeletons, and exploring
        the properties of plaster of Paris (starting with powder and water and
        discovering the way it gave off heat and then went solid). We used it in
        our art and craft corner making moulds with plasticine and sea-shells
        and then pouring in plaster of Paris to make a kind of bas relief - and
        every child doing one. Young children are compylsive learners -
        exploring , experimenting, practicign new skills, - I find it much
        easier to teach children things that they are interested in - and it
        seems so much easier to learn that way too. Anything to do with
        learning ICT skills tends to send me to sleep - unless I need to learn
        to use it for some project I am doing.

        Am I right in thinking that the constructive design theory is basically
        the same principles that we learnt for young children - but applied to
        adults?
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