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Re: [learningfromeachother] Re: Talking Teachers

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  • Edward Cherlin
    ... You may find the reports on the impact of One Laptop Per Child XO computers in Ethiopia and elsewhere useful for comparison.
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 29, 2008
      On Mon, Jul 28, 2008 at 7:06 AM, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Pam,
      >
      > Thanks a lot for the wonderful insights. i have been unable to open
      >
      > http://d4tel. blogspot. com/. I get response about the site being not
      > valid. Please check it out once again for me.

      You may find the reports on the impact of One Laptop Per Child XO
      computers in Ethiopia and elsewhere useful for comparison.

      http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Academic_Papers

      > The background information on TT content and delivery is very elaborate; I
      > feel it is more like the backbone of the project. At the moment we are using
      > the Microsoft Digital Literacy curriculum, Microsoft being the sponsors
      > under the Partners in Learning initiative. However I want to take the risk
      > and have the teacher trainers and the beneficiaries to have something
      > different to compare with. This means that the program overlaps with the TT
      > inasmuch as my interest is computer literacy/media education of teachers is
      > concerned.
      >
      >
      >
      > My interest is also rejuvenated by your TT- Hands on Computer, especially
      > the familiarity component which is lacking in the M/S Digital Literacy
      > Curriculum say not NC3 .I will definitely have a better perspective once o
      > get the PowerPoint document about it. I will definitely be involved in
      > establishing or sensitizing the beneficiaries to join online communities of
      > learning for information sharing and professional advancement. I also
      > appreciate the waves of software innovations, e.g. Many MultiPointâ„¢ Mouse
      > Thin Client that is making computing more affordable.
      >
      >
      >
      > Inasmuch as I have already set up a work plan, this is a program that I am
      > developing learning and implementing, so it is not cast in stone to disallow
      > pragmatic inputs from you Pam .My intention is to have teachers be active
      > users of computers. I dread OLPC without first thinking of One Laptop per
      > Teacher (OLPT) which would easily lead to a network where teachers sharing
      > experiences in an open professional way. There is a lot of synergy sharing
      > given that the 30 TOT's we are training will pitch camp at the at the
      > grassroot level during the November-December school holidays .Each will
      > target 40 teachers every school holiday for the next one year. The
      > evaluation process thereafter, will determine the way forward for the
      > project.
      >
      >
      >
      > The pupils of this generation are way ahead of teachers in handling
      > info-gadgets. Teachers in Kenya have blamed mobile phones as a contributing
      > factor in the recent wave of strikes in schools. The minister of education
      > did impose a blanket ban on the usage of mobile phones in school, whereas in
      > South Africa, Mobile phones are being used for educational purposes
      > www.mlearner.co.za .
      >
      >
      >
      > The truth of the matter is that teachers increasingly feel inadequate and
      > left behind by students with regard to information technology. Sometime back
      > in January, you mentioned the vices that go with computer Games, Gambling
      > and Girls. It reminded me of a scenario in the school I was teaching where
      > at teacher on duty got some students watching a pornographic DVD the kids
      > had copied in the hard drive. He arraigned them before the principal, but
      > alas, both of them being computer illiterate had no evidence even as it was
      > all there before them! .After thorough canning and suspension( the students
      > did not admit. leave alone their youthful instructor(not a professional
      > teacher himself) who feared losing his job.
      >
      > Dan Andrew Otedo (B.ed.Arts )
      > Administrator,
      > Suba Youth Resource Centre(SYRC)
      > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
      > Kenya
      > +254720366094
      >
      > --- On Sun, 7/27/08, Pamela McLean <pam54321@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Pamela McLean <pam54321@...>
      > Subject: TT ToT - Teachers Talking Training of Trainers.
      > To: learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com, "Dan Otedo" <dotedo@...>,
      > "Mendenyo Men-denyo" <mendenyo@yahoogroups.com>, ibeazley@...
      > Date: Sunday, July 27, 2008, 10:27 AM
      >
      > Dan
      >
      > Ref my previous email saying "I will write more about the TT programme in a
      > separate email which I will call TT ToT - Teachers Talking Training of
      > Trainers.
      > I believe it could have relevance to the work you are doing, setting up
      > TOT's training for teachers on Computer Literacy at the Kenya Institute of
      > Education."
      >
      > You wrote "David Mutua. Am now temporarily based in Nairobi, setting up
      > training of TOT's training for teachers on Computer Literacy at the Kenya
      > Institute of Education, so the teachers programme is very much on schedule."
      > I understand form this that your programme has some overlap with the TT
      > Kenya programme which David and I did for COL last year, so I will simply
      > give you more details of TT based on that assumption. (If my assumption is
      > wrong and there is not yet any overlap then I apologise for any confusion,
      > and ask that we do explore overlap later). When David was in UK recently for
      > PCF5 he asked me to write up TT details for him to pass on. I am thinking
      > that perhaps it was you he had in mind.
      >
      > ~ TT (Teachers Talking) content and delivery
      > You can get some background information on TT content and delivery here
      > http://d4tel.blogspot.com/. Let me know if you have difficulty downloading
      > this link (which is a slide show) and I will send the information to you in
      > some other way. I have also given additional background at the end of this
      > email, but want to move first to the main parts of TT and how they might
      > relate to a course for trainers and your interests.
      >
      > ~ Essential elements of TT
      > There are three elements of TT - Hands-on Computers, TT-Online and the
      > No-Computer Computer Course (NC3) which I will outline below.
      >
      >>Hands-on Computers.
      > This is the practical training that teachers need if they are to speak with
      > confidence about computer use from first hand experience. If they are going
      > to have continued access to computers then obviously they need to become
      > competent. However if they are not going to have access to computers after
      > the TT course then they only need familiarity, not competence, so that is
      > all we aim for on the initial course. On the initial TT course we work on
      > the assumption that some or all of the teachers who are participating will
      > be seeing/using a computer for the first time. We build in some parallel
      > practical activities so that participants who do have previous knowledge can
      > also use their Hands-On Computers time usefully.
      >
      > I imagine you already have your own ideas for hands-on training based on the
      > work you have done elsewhere. But If any resources we use would be of
      > interest I would be happy to share them with you.
      >
      >>TT-Online
      > This is the online aspect of computer use with specific relevance to
      > teachers (such as participating in online communities of learning, using the
      > Internet for information and professional development, elearning for pupils
      > and teachers, benefits of ICT for community learning and development). In
      > designing the course I recognise that most of the TT participants will not
      > have regular online access after the course. However it seems important
      > that TT-Online gives participants this first hand experience, so they can
      > have a vision for online educational opportunities and describe these
      > opportunities accurately to others. TT-Online is also part of looking
      > forward and preparing participants for some future time when they may be
      > able to visit a cyber cafe, or when the ICT infrastucture will bring online
      > access closer to them.
      >
      > Course participants are enthusiastic about TT-Online, especially the way
      > that they become included in online communities.
      >
      >> Additional community benefits of TT-Online for the development of
      >> e-learning and ICT for education and development
      >
      > As I see it one of the incidental, but important, benefits of TT-online is
      > that teachers start to learn about elearning, and other kinds of ODL (Open
      > and Distance learning) and self directed learning. If ICT is to have
      > benefits for education and development we need as many people as possible to
      > understand these things and be involved. This is one reason why I am happy
      > to see you are working at an Institute of Education. I hope they will be
      > interested in more than just the ICT content i.e. concerned with effective
      > strategies for teaching and learning as well.
      >
      > I feel that we need people in the schools and communities who have learned
      > the new attitudes to learning and teaching that are essential for the
      > successful uptake of ICT for education and development. Basic office skills
      > like word processing can be a useful starting point, but teachers and
      > trainers need to know there is so much more to ICT in education and
      > development.
      >
      > By the way, I have a lovely example from TT-Online where, many months after
      > a TT course, I was sent an email from a course participant via an
      > infomediary (information intermediary) . The participant was experimenting
      > with planting ginger. She wanted information from the Internet before
      > harvest time to help her make the most of her crop. She said that if her
      > experiment was successful then she would share the information with her
      > community. I believe this kind of awareness raising that comes through
      > TT-Online could be very beneficial in the uptake of ICT in rural areas and
      > other underserved communities.
      >
      >> The No-Computer Computer Course (NC3)
      > This is the part of the course where teachers learn how to teach about
      > computers in poorly resourced rural schools by building from what is known
      > to what is unknown. The course is very participative and includes group
      > activities, games and role playing. The only resources that I use are
      > resources that the teachers will already have in their schools (e.g. people,
      > blackboard, pencils and paper) and a small collection of A4 sheets which we
      > photocopy during the course. We also explore how to make use of any digital
      > technology people may have, such as calculators or phones. The teachers use
      > the activities that we do during NC3 as the basis for their own lesson
      > planning. Pupils who do a successful NC3 course should develop an
      > understanding of what computers are and how they work. Ideally they will
      > feel interested and confident about having a go at using a computer should
      > the opportunity arise. They should also start to develop information
      > handling skills and strategies related to organising data and extracting
      > information.
      >
      > ~ Relevance to ToT
      > Does TT have any relevance to your work with Training of Trainers?
      >
      > I don't know how far advanced your work with trainers is. If it is already
      > up and running then I imagine you are already tackling the hands-on
      > computers aspect of ICT training, but I hope the addition of some elements
      > of TT-Online and the No-Computer Computer Course could be a useful addition.
      >
      > So far on TT Kenya we have worked at the teacher level, but if we are to
      > spread the TT approach more widely then we need to train trainers, rather
      > than training teachers, so I would very much appreciate an opportunity to
      > work with you.
      >
      > ~ TT design and development history
      > As you probably know from David, TT is a programme which has been under
      > development for many years (alongside other work). It builds on work done in
      > the UK (on computers in primary schools) work on the Internet (about
      > communities of learning, use of the Internet, etc) and work with teachers in
      > rural Nigeria. The informal work that I did on needs-assessment and informal
      > training was done with David while he was at Ago-Are. Through David I got to
      > know local teachers both as school teachers and in their wider community
      > roles. You will probably already have experience of David's networking
      > skills and interests in building firm foundations in the community so that
      > work will be strongly rooted and will be long-term. The first formal TT
      > course was presented at Fantsuam Foundation in 2004 at John Dada'a request
      > (I do TT for him during "working holidays", and am still continuing to
      > develop it there). David was working at Fantsuam when I presented the first
      > and second courses. When he went back to Kenya he got funding from COL to
      > launch TT Kenya with teachers in Kangundo district (which I presented pro
      > bono). I feel we have done sufficient proof of concept at grass-roots level
      > and should now be looking at ways to scale up by presenting a version of TT
      > designed for Trainers of Teachers. This feeling has been reinforced by what
      > I learned at the PCF5 conference that David and I attended in London
      > recently.
      >
      > ~ TT and Training of Trainers in Kenya
      > At present I am the only person presenting the TT course - this is something
      > which needs changing. It was necessary during the initial phases of course
      > design and delivery. However now the content has been well tested I am more
      > concerned with training up local people to replace me so that the course
      > becomes easily replicable. Recent course development work at Fantsuam has
      > been focusing on how to reduce my face-to-face involvement, to increase
      > local input, and to explore more e-learning elements.
      >
      > So far in Kenya we have tested the course content to see if it would be
      > equally useful in Kenya. Feedback from David and the course participants
      > indicates the course is appropriate. I would like to explore with you if any
      > of TT would be relevant for your work at the Institute of Education. If so,
      > I would like to explore an adaptation of TT as a training course for
      > trainers. I hope this information is helpful, along with the information you
      > are getting from David on the organisational practicalities, and the
      > response from teachers and other stakeholders so far.
      >
      > Pam
      >
      >



      --
      Edward Cherlin
      End Poverty at a Profit by teaching children business
      http://www.EarthTreasury.org/
      "The best way to predict the future is to invent it."--Alan Kay
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