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Re: Building the economy through Peace Centres.

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  • Andrius Kulikauskas
    Henry Migingo +254 733 695 259, I send you Pamela McLean s wonderful and timely letter. I ask your help and all at John Roger s Cyfranogi working group. We
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 7, 2008
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      Henry Migingo +254 733 695 259,

      I send you Pamela McLean's wonderful and timely letter. I ask your help
      and all at John Roger's Cyfranogi working group.

      We need an immediate economic works program that would include all idle
      hands and provide the most basic needs for all people, starting with
      safety, water, food, shelter and up from there. We need especially to
      keep the young people busy.

      The work could be as simple as making footballs out of plastic bags and
      twine (as the Tanzanians do), mixed-tribe groups escorting by foot
      people to their homes (which might be thirty kilometers away yet still
      walkable with help and protection), entertaining refugee children with
      theater (as Repacted.org does), writing SMS messages for peace. These
      should be a Fun Works program because the biggest threat now is a sour
      attitude and idle hands.

      We need to draw and print a bill/coupon/script/ that can be used. I
      suggest that you have the youths hand draw the bills. This is an honor
      system. The bills can be small denominations such as One Hour, they can
      have the motto "Humanity before Politics", "Enemies embracing enemies"
      and they are issued by the "Pyramid of Peace and the Circles of Justice"
      (if Janet and all might approve I suggest the "circles of justice" name
      for our positive side of work, and I will defer to her, but I am willing
      to err in the meantime.)

      My thought is that our economics program be based on "circles of
      justice" until we can think of something better. We look at our money
      as a way to connect all so that all may be included as equals with a
      turn at control. And there are many interlinking circles.

      The One Hour of Fun Time note means that you get it for one hour of fun
      work that you do, and you spend it on one hour of fun enjoyment.

      The Peace Credit you earn when you send a text message for peace and you
      let us know we will give you enough to send two more. Keep track of
      your peace credits and we (Pyramid of Peace and Circles of Justice) owe
      you and will try to repay you or we stay in your debt. This an
      unsustainable system but that is OK, perhaps the point.

      The Long Day of Hospitality means that you took care of a person for one
      day and provided them shelter and water and shared your food with them.
      You can trade it for another Long Day of Hospitality. (This is an idea
      from Mexico.)

      You get the idea. These notes can be hand drawn by the children, they
      can be photocopied, they can be abused. They are there to encourage
      sharing and action and asking for help and responding. Blessed are
      those who honor them. Please write that also: Blessed are those who
      honor me and my maker.

      Thank you, Kennedy Owino +254 723 568 251and Rachel Wambui Kungu +254
      721 626 389 for your fantastic reports and sound thinking and wonderful
      leadership. I will send more money this evening to Kennedy with
      instructions, please I ask for help to all who might send money to
      ms@... by PayPal or the link at http://www.pyramidofpeace.net or write
      for details, we can accept credit cards and checks, too.

      Janet and all, what do you think of Circles of Justice? Does it speak to
      the heart of your holistic vision? I say justice instead of peace
      because of our discussion that peace comes before justice. We need
      "just" enough short term peace so that we can work "piece-by-piece" on
      long term justice, thus healing. (Janet, you influence me!)

      Andrius

      Andrius Kulikauskas
      Pyramid of Peace
      http://www.pyramidofpeace.net
      Minciu Sodas
      http://www.ms.lt
      ms@...
      +370 699 30003
      Vilnius, Lithuania

      Pamela McLean wrote:
      > Tom and everyone.
      >
      > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the
      > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the cause.Somehow
      > we have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
      > understand that the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also
      > drives much of the robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably
      > something similar with the killings we have here, and in many
      > countries. It is very terrible.)
      >
      > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new model
      > for the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
      >
      > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling that
      > in the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of public
      > work in the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work
      > on projects of value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting
      > the economy. Could PoP initiate something similar?
      >
      > There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding. What
      > if PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
      > started by building local Peace Centres. People could start now,
      > finding appropriate sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow
      > we must find money to feed the workers, even if at first they could
      > not be paid a wage. Work also uses energy and time that can otherwise
      > go on violence - and productive work gives purpose and is a source of
      > pride. Good workers would be first in line as paid jobs begin to come
      > through - but the opportunities need to be spread as widely s possible
      > for community benefit - not individual gain - local peopel will know
      > how it should be done.
      >
      > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the
      > internet for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that
      > to begin with we only use well tried examples of good practice (such
      > as water harvesting, already familiar in Kenya). People will not be
      > in the right mood for experiments that may not work. Experimentation
      > can come later.
      >
      > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary shelter or
      > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would of
      > course have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
      > phones initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
      > connectivity. The centres could gradually become centres of education
      > and training, as well as sports and arts and general community centres
      > - power houses of innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding,
      > vocational skiil building, health education, enterprise development
      > incorporating micro finance and other enabling services etc. They
      > could also become experimental centres for sustainable technology -
      > biogas etc. This would all be done through local small steps but with
      > big vision - e.g. sports starts with a couple of footballs - but with
      > a vision for tournaments and so on.
      >
      > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local labour
      > and local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
      > slower results and an approach that is initially low tech. However
      > there should be an emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything
      > that is not sustainable should be seen as a temporary solution with
      > plans to replace it. Gradually the centres should become models of
      > excellence of local - really local - developments - locally individual
      > solutions to local needs - but with a shared vision and 'feel' to
      > them. They would share openly good ides that work - and share problems
      > and difficulties so that everyone can learn from them.
      >
      > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once the
      > centre was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
      > sustainable housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
      >
      > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful approach -
      > not some top down model.
      >
      > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed into
      > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
      >
      > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this afternoons
      > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
      >
      > Pam
      >
      > 07/02/2008, *tom ochuka* <tomochuka@...
      > <mailto:tomochuka@...>> wrote:
      >
      > Dear All,
      > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
      > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
      > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
      > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
      > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
      > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
      > with noplacesof employment.
      > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
      > acentre.
      > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
      > with joytang about this.
      > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownpor
      > alliscalm..now day 6.
      > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
      > scholsare on.
      > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
      > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany..it
      > wasanother violence.
      > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
      > 100yrsoldcity.
      > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
      > avictimof looting ..whilegand.invaded my house.
      > Thisismuchidleness..lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
      > people..and they willstopit...they just..got
      > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
      > aare jobless.
      > Thanks
      > TOM.
      > -
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Pamela McLean
      Dear Dan Thank you for your observation that the post election troubles are ... a reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof felt that
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 7, 2008
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        Dear Dan

        Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles are ... a reaction  to the injustice done  to the Kenyan  voter who kindof felt  that some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral  process."

        There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can contribute..

        Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but from a slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of the future benefits of ICT.

        I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development, but from a different starting point. I do not have any personal direct connection with the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that has relied on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to gradual sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable knowledge and experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to share.  However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way Minciu Sodas works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way. 

        Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and activists - we are not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is an "Orchard of Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-)  We value ICT because we know that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas and information.

        In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the information come first, and  the technology follows - I think it is the other way round in the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the telecentres there is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to work within Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because there are paid jobs.

        I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can help with development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my impression that many people see computers as "something to learn" rather  than "something to use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should breifly explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"  I.e. they have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job doing word processing or accounts.  I know other people who use computes in their daily life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing their minds and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers who will really be change makers and benefit their local communities - not just those who learn computers to get jobs.

        I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you bring the knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with us. Certainly the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of Peace and I hope they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.

        Pam

        On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:

        Pam,
        We seem to be thinking about  the same thing, and that is very good.I also concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The bringadadge  that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which  is due to a build-up  of emotions over time.
         
        The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair. This is a reaction  to the injustice done  to the Kenyan  voter who kindof felt  that some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral  process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching  the outcome of the Mediation  and should no appropriate solution bases on justice and truth not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged  into  the Dark ages. Woe unto Kenya  if this ever happens.
         
        Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em is a noble idea of going about solving  this  problem.It is very true like  in n any conflict, there is the presenting issue and  the emmerging  issues.  The former  in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while  the bigger one  is  the myriad of injustices kenyans of different  ethno-political persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of  a class struggle.Too bad politics  innkenya has been ethnicised.
         
        Am a very strong believer  in ICT4D.Major world economies today are Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has already become a ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility  they enjoy after  the genocide? We cannot undescore  the role of ICT in creation  of new jobs, new  markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions of otherwise idle Kenyan  youths  who only  look at their- well -to -do technosavy relatives with  jealosy. This is the basis  of the vision of my programme Reaching  the Unreached.
         
        The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of land  for such centres. Perhaps  it would be good  to try identify existing but moribund public  structures like Playing fields, cooperative societies ,Market places etc, whie  involving  the local authorities so that  the issue of unlimited acess and ownership is put into perspective.
         
        How about developing  a project strategy  that revovles around several activities as some practical steps :
        • Community mobilisation/awareness creation and marketing
        • Developing Peace Centre specifications
        • Sourcing and  installing hardware equipment and software
        • Recruitment  of  staff
        • Development of local content taking  into cognisance  the social economic enviroment
        • Business  incubation ( a kind of informal sector business  institute )
        • Strategies  for sustainability
        • Monitoring and evaluation  of  the Peace Centres
         The  peace centres  would be more of  community resource centres, complete with several other activities  for entertainment to help in bonding  the  youth towards progressive activities. 
         
        Now  the challange  is how  to get  our act together while appreciating  the different strengths each  of us have ,develop some worklplan and have Those  with a passion for  this  to coalesce around it .
         
         
         

        Pamela McLean <pam54321@...> wrote:
        Tom and everyone.

        As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the cause.Somehow we have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I understand that the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives much of the robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something similar with the killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very terrible.)

        How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new model for the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.

        My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling that in the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of public work in the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work on projects of value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the economy.  Could PoP initiate something similar?

        There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding. What if PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP started by building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding appropriate sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find money to feed the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage. Work also uses energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and productive work gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be first in line as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities need to be spread as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual gain - local peopel will know how it should be done. 

        I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the internet for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to begin with we only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water harvesting, already familiar in Kenya).  People will not be in the right mood for experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.

        Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary shelter or other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would of course have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP phones initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full connectivity. The centres could gradually become centres of education and training, as well as sports and arts and general community centres - power houses of innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational skiil building, health education, enterprise development incorporating micro finance and other enabling services etc. They could also become experimental centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would all be done through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports starts with a couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so on.

        My feeling is that preference should always be given to local labour and local materials - even if that involves more skill building, slower results and an approach that is initially low tech.  However there should be an emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not sustainable should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace it. Gradually the centres should become models of excellence of local - really local - developments - locally individual solutions to local needs - but with a shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good ides that work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone can learn from them.   

        Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once the centre was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by sustainable housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
         
        Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful approach - not some top down model.

        Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed into something workable? What practical first  steps could we take?

        Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this afternoons chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.

        Pam
         
        07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@...> wrote:
        Dear All,
        Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
        rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
        on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
        in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
        another comunity..What has been here is looting.
        This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
        with noplacesof employment.
        weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
        acentre.
        Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
        with joytang about this.
        Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownpor
        alliscalm..now day 6.
        Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
        scholsare on.
        Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
        mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany..it
        wasanother violence.
        We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
        100yrsoldcity.
        I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
        avictimof looting ..whilegand.invaded my house.
        Thisismuchidleness..lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
        people..and they willstopit...they just..got
        opportunity hiding under election but..they really
        aare jobless.
        Thanks
        TOM.
        -





        Dan Andrew Otedo
        Administrator
        Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
        P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
        Kenya
        +254720366094


        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.


      • ricardoolpc
        Hi Pam and Dan I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to promote peace and provide work for local youths. Dan makes a good point about the
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 7, 2008
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          Hi Pam and Dan

          I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
          promote peace and provide work for local youths.

          Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
          centre being the most important things. That implies some money
          needs to be raised to start the centres.

          That can be broken down into :-

          1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).

          2. Inside/local funding.

          I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get onto
          the more desirable/sustainable local funding.

          Possible outside funding sources:

          1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
          website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
          donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
          chequess, etc.

          2. Donations via Dan's charity/non-profit, registered in Kenya.

          Either of these could be promoted in the press by
          articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself Pam,
          by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
          potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
          biography. That would lead into an article about the existing peace
          work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
          dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the peace
          work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
          action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
          several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could finish
          with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
          written 'landing-page', summarising the work and the peace centre
          concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
          be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other charities,
          Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.

          Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote Dan's
          organization.

          Other outside funding:

          Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
          Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
          Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at last
          and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
          Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
          fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in 2009.
          Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
          broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger Economy'
          like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').

          http://allafrica.com/stories/200802051178.html

          Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
          through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
          Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office programs,
          etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.

          Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
          sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
          centres.

          Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
          winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
          small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
          VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
          cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
          company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
          Centres/TeleCentres.

          Local funding:

          Offline local fund-raising events -

          a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local people
          to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
          wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
          opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace Centre.

          b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
          the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
          Nairobi.

          c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of the
          profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral marketing',
          so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.

          d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
          some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum of
          seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as an
          all-in-one printer/scanner/photocopier for £40 or $80, making money
          just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
          provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
          photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
          earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
          computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/Infrared link, and
          connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
          service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
          provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses for
          the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
          computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.

          The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
          before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.

          Income activities:

          One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
          one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar businesses,
          such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
          plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
          notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service details
          from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
          business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
          people and people further away can at least find that business and
          place orders by phone or know where they are from a simple map or
          address. The fee for creating the page could be split as income for
          the worker and for the Peace Centre. Its a good 'learning by doing'
          job-skill as well. The worker may use some of the money for more
          online time, for other things.

          Anything that stimulates the real offline economy is good. Maybe you
          can think of further examples, or the youths themselves can. They
          could even create the websites for free, just to help the local
          economy, and benefit indirectly. The businesses may offer them on-
          going website maintenance work, for this week's special offers.


          Broadcasting by Sneakernet:

          One scheme with multiple uses is to set up a 'broadcasting network'
          by CD, flash-drive, or cassette. Using a single PC or Laptop to
          prepare 'radio-programmes', you could 'broadcast' to people with CD
          players, MP3 players, computers at other centres. This could be for
          peace discussion programmers, or raising people's awareness of ICT
          opportunities or ordinary work like brick-laying.

          Miscellaneous sales:

          If people learn how to produce simple websites, you can boost the
          local economy with free/paid small ads online, and printed as
          posters for those without computer access. In time, it may turn into
          a major auction site like eBay, that don't operate in Africa yet. If
          the sites from all Peace Centres were linked, cross-selling and mail-
          order could boost the economy.

          Well that's far too much for one message! What do you think?

          Ricardo










          --- In learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com, "Pamela McLean"
          <pam54321@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Dan
          >
          > Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles
          are ... a
          > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
          felt that
          > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
          process."
          >
          >
          > There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can
          contribute..
          >
          > Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but
          from a
          > slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of
          the future
          > benefits of ICT.
          >
          > I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development, but
          from a
          > different starting point. I do not have any personal direct
          connection with
          > the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that
          has relied
          > on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to
          gradual
          > sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable
          knowledge and
          > experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to
          share.
          > However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way
          Minciu Sodas
          > works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way.
          >
          > Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and
          activists - we are
          > not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is
          an "Orchard of
          > Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-) We value ICT
          because we know
          > that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas
          and
          > information.
          >
          > In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the information
          come
          > first, and the technology follows - I think it is the other way
          round in
          > the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the
          telecentres there
          > is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to
          work within
          > Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because
          there are
          > paid jobs.
          >
          > I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can help
          with
          > development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my
          impression that
          > many people see computers as "something to learn" rather
          than "something to
          > use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should
          breifly
          > explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"
          I.e. they
          > have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job doing
          word
          > processing or accounts. I know other people who use computes in
          their daily
          > life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing
          their minds
          > and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers who
          will
          > really be change makers and benefit their local communities - not
          just those
          > who learn computers to get jobs.
          >
          > I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you bring
          the
          > knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with us.
          Certainly
          > the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of Peace
          and I hope
          > they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.
          >
          > Pam
          >
          > On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Pam,
          > > We seem to be thinking about the same thing, and that is very
          good.I also
          > > concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The
          bringadadge
          > > that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which is
          due to a
          > > build-up of emotions over time.
          > >
          > > The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair. This
          is a
          > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
          felt that
          > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
          > > process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching the
          outcome of
          > > the Mediation and should no appropriate solution bases on
          justice and truth
          > > not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged into the
          Dark
          > > ages. Woe unto Kenya if this ever happens.
          > >
          > > Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em is
          a noble
          > > idea of going about solving this problem.It is very true like
          in n any
          > > conflict, there is the presenting issue and the emmerging
          issues. The
          > > former in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while
          the bigger
          > > one is the myriad of injustices kenyans of different ethno-
          political
          > > persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of a
          class
          > > struggle.Too bad politics innkenya has been ethnicised.
          > >
          > > Am a very strong believer in ICT4D.Major world economies today
          are
          > > Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has already
          become a
          > > ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility they enjoy
          after the
          > > genocide? We cannot undescore the role of ICT in creation of
          new jobs,
          > > new markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions of
          otherwise
          > > idle Kenyan youths who only look at their- well -to -do
          technosavy
          > > relatives with jealosy. This is the basis of the vision of my
          programme
          > > *Reaching the Unreached.*
          > > **
          > > The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical
          > > mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of land
          for such
          > > centres. Perhaps it would be good to try identify existing but
          moribund
          > > public structures like Playing fields, cooperative
          societies ,Market places
          > > etc, whie involving the local authorities so that the issue
          of unlimited
          > > acess and ownership is put into perspective.
          > >
          > > How about developing a project strategy that revovles around
          several
          > > activities as some practical steps :
          > >
          > > - Community mobilisation/awareness creation and marketing
          > > - Developing Peace Centre specifications
          > > - Sourcing and installing hardware equipment and software
          > > - Recruitment of staff
          > > - Development of local content taking into cognisance the
          social
          > > economic enviroment
          > > - Business incubation ( a kind of informal sector business
          > > institute )
          > > - Strategies for sustainability
          > > - Monitoring and evaluation of the Peace Centres
          > >
          > > The peace centres would be more of community resource
          centres,
          > > complete with several other activities for entertainment to
          help in
          > > bonding the youth towards progressive activities.
          > >
          > > Now the challange is how to get our act together while
          appreciating
          > > the different strengths each of us have ,develop some worklplan
          and have
          > > Those with a passion for this to coalesce around it .
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > *Pamela McLean <pam54321@...>* wrote:
          > >
          > > Tom and everyone.
          > >
          > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the
          > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the
          cause.Somehow we
          > > have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
          understand that
          > > the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives much
          of the
          > > robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something
          similar with the
          > > killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very
          terrible.)
          > >
          > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new
          model for
          > > the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
          > >
          > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling
          that in
          > > the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of
          public work in
          > > the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work on
          projects of
          > > value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the
          economy. Could
          > > PoP initiate something similar?
          > >
          > > There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding.
          What if
          > > PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
          started by
          > > building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding
          appropriate
          > > sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find
          money to feed
          > > the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage.
          Work also uses
          > > energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and
          productive work
          > > gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be
          first in line
          > > as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities need
          to be spread
          > > as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual
          gain - local
          > > peopel will know how it should be done.
          > >
          > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the
          internet
          > > for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to
          begin with we
          > > only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water
          harvesting,
          > > already familiar in Kenya). People will not be in the right
          mood for
          > > experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.
          > >
          > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary
          shelter or
          > > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would
          of course
          > > have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
          phones
          > > initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
          connectivity.
          > > The centres could gradually become centres of education and
          training, as
          > > well as sports and arts and general community centres - power
          houses of
          > > innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational
          skiil
          > > building, health education, enterprise development incorporating
          micro
          > > finance and other enabling services etc. They could also become
          experimental
          > > centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would all
          be done
          > > through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports
          starts with a
          > > couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so
          on.
          > >
          > > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local
          labour and
          > > local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
          slower results
          > > and an approach that is initially low tech. However there
          should be an
          > > emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not
          sustainable
          > > should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace it.
          Gradually
          > > the centres should become models of excellence of local - really
          local -
          > > developments - locally individual solutions to local needs - but
          with a
          > > shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good
          ides that
          > > work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone can
          learn from
          > > them.
          > >
          > > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once
          the centre
          > > was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
          sustainable
          > > housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
          > >
          > > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful
          approach - not
          > > some top down model.
          > >
          > > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed
          into
          > > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
          > >
          > > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this
          afternoons
          > > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
          > >
          > > Pam
          > >
          > > 07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Dear All,
          > > > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
          > > > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
          > > > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
          > > > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
          > > > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
          > > > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
          > > > with noplacesof employment.
          > > > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
          > > > acentre.
          > > > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
          > > > with joytang about this.
          > > > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownpor
          > > > alliscalm..now day 6.
          > > > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
          > > > scholsare on.
          > > > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
          > > > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany..it
          > > > wasanother violence.
          > > > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
          > > > 100yrsoldcity.
          > > > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
          > > > avictimof looting ..whilegand.invaded my house.
          > > > Thisismuchidleness..lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
          > > > people..and they willstopit...they just..got
          > > > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
          > > > aare jobless.
          > > > Thanks
          > > > TOM.
          > > > -
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Dan Andrew Otedo
          > > Administrator
          > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
          > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
          > > Kenya
          > > +254720366094
          > >
          > > ------------------------------
          > > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
          Mobile. Try it
          > >
          now.<http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51733/*http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=
          Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ>
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • ricardoolpc
          Dan and Pam I see from the HolisticHelping yahoo group (see link below) that Kenneth Chelimo, leader of the Kenya Network of Telecentres (KenTel), is working
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 8, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Dan and Pam

            I see from the HolisticHelping yahoo group (see link below) that
            Kenneth Chelimo, leader of the Kenya Network of Telecentres
            (KenTel), is working with Joy Tang and Jeff Buderer's One Village
            Foundation to set up very well funded Urgent Unity Response Centres
            (URC), with computers, internet, phones, photocopiers, etc, for
            counselling, reconciliation, sporting activities, trading-airtime,
            etc.

            Are URCs linked to the Peace Centre scheme at all (a more bottom-up
            approach)? Do you co-ordinate with their team very often?

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/holistichelping/message/2245

            Using top-down (externally funded) or bottom-up (locally funded by
            organic growth) approaches to building centres isn't an either-or
            situation. Both are needed. I'm just thinking that tying the two
            schemes together and swapping ideas may be a 2 + 2 = 5 situation.
            Their description sounds very conventional, using the expensive
            internet technology that US and European countries can afford.

            If funds are available for high-tech centres, that's great. In
            addition, communication could be extended out into the countryside,
            where the internet and cell-phone coverage isn't available by other
            cheaper (or older) communications technologies, like Sneakernet file-
            transfer on CD, flash-drive and floppy, or carrying files on phones
            in their internal memory or flash-card, file transfer from Bluetooth
            Phone-to-Bluetooth Phone, or Infrared phone-to-Infrared phones, etc.

            1-way broadcasting of data-files is something that interests me
            (perhaps at night by ordinary FM radio stations etc). It could be
            quite cheap to broadcast web-pages for news and current events,
            group email newsletters, yahoo group message, info on what roads are
            open, etc, or broadcast computer programs, photos, sound and video-
            clips, a rolling carousel of files to be stored as a library, etc.

            It would be good to have a 'phone technology education programme',
            as a bit of 'awareness raising' of what people can do with the
            phones they already own. Many people don't seem to be aware that the
            phones they already own can access the internet via GPRS, using a
            downloaded browser like the free Opera Mini program. They don't have
            to go to a cyber-cafe to surf the web and access their email. Phone-
            access saves time, distance and it's safer not to travel. The costs
            would have to be compared, for different activities.

            Some people have never read their phone manual and aren't aware it
            has an Infrared or Bluetooth interface to transfer files, such as
            messages they have written to/from other phones or PCs/laptops. It
            would be good to have a collection of downloaded phone manual pdf
            files form the Nokia, Sony Ericsson, Motorola sites, etc, at the
            peace/URC centres or carried on phones or laptops, to operate a kind
            of 'technology clinic' for phone-owners.

            See :-

            An article I wrote for the One Laptop Per Child wiki...

            http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Sneakernet

            Accessing the internet from a Mobile Phone, using GPRS...

            http://www.worknets.org/wiki.cgi?InternetAccessByMobilePhone

            Wikipedia article on GPRS (General Packet Radio Service)...

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Packet_Radio_Service

            Opera Browser...

            http://www.opera.com/products/

            Anyway, these are some of the things that could link the centre
            together or extend them out into the countryside or into the
            community of phone-users.

            Ricardo

            --- In learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com, "ricardoolpc"
            <ricardoolpc@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Pam and Dan
            >
            > I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
            > promote peace and provide work for local youths.
            >
            > Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
            > centre being the most important things. That implies some money
            > needs to be raised to start the centres.
            >
            > That can be broken down into :-
            >
            > 1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).
            >
            > 2. Inside/local funding.
            >
            > I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get
            onto
            > the more desirable/sustainable local funding.
            >
            > Possible outside funding sources:
            >
            > 1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
            > website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
            > donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
            > chequess, etc.
            >
            > 2. Donations via Dan's charity/non-profit, registered in Kenya.
            >
            > Either of these could be promoted in the press by
            > articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself
            Pam,
            > by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
            > potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
            > biography. That would lead into an article about the existing
            peace
            > work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
            > dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the
            peace
            > work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
            > action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
            > several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could
            finish
            > with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
            > written 'landing-page', summarising the work and the peace centre
            > concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
            > be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other
            charities,
            > Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.
            >
            > Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote
            Dan's
            > organization.
            >
            > Other outside funding:
            >
            > Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
            > Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
            > Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at
            last
            > and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
            > Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
            > fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in
            2009.
            > Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
            > broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger
            Economy'
            > like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').
            >
            > http://allafrica.com/stories/200802051178.html
            >
            > Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
            > through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
            > Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office
            programs,
            > etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.
            >
            > Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
            > sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
            > centres.
            >
            > Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
            > winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
            > small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
            > VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
            > cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
            > company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
            > Centres/TeleCentres.
            >
            > Local funding:
            >
            > Offline local fund-raising events -
            >
            > a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local
            people
            > to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
            > wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
            > opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace
            Centre.
            >
            > b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
            > the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
            > Nairobi.
            >
            > c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of
            the
            > profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral
            marketing',
            > so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.
            >
            > d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
            > some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum
            of
            > seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as
            an
            > all-in-one printer/scanner/photocopier for £40 or $80, making
            money
            > just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
            > provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
            > photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
            > earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
            > computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/Infrared link,
            and
            > connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
            > service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
            > provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses
            for
            > the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
            > computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.
            >
            > The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
            > before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.
            >
            > Income activities:
            >
            > One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
            > one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar
            businesses,
            > such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
            > plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
            > notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service
            details
            > from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
            > business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
            > people and people further away can at least find that business and
            > place orders by phone or know where they are from a simple map or
            > address. The fee for creating the page could be split as income
            for
            > the worker and for the Peace Centre. Its a good 'learning by
            doing'
            > job-skill as well. The worker may use some of the money for more
            > online time, for other things.
            >
            > Anything that stimulates the real offline economy is good. Maybe
            you
            > can think of further examples, or the youths themselves can. They
            > could even create the websites for free, just to help the local
            > economy, and benefit indirectly. The businesses may offer them on-
            > going website maintenance work, for this week's special offers.
            >
            >
            > Broadcasting by Sneakernet:
            >
            > One scheme with multiple uses is to set up a 'broadcasting
            network'
            > by CD, flash-drive, or cassette. Using a single PC or Laptop to
            > prepare 'radio-programmes', you could 'broadcast' to people with
            CD
            > players, MP3 players, computers at other centres. This could be
            for
            > peace discussion programmers, or raising people's awareness of ICT
            > opportunities or ordinary work like brick-laying.
            >
            > Miscellaneous sales:
            >
            > If people learn how to produce simple websites, you can boost the
            > local economy with free/paid small ads online, and printed as
            > posters for those without computer access. In time, it may turn
            into
            > a major auction site like eBay, that don't operate in Africa yet.
            If
            > the sites from all Peace Centres were linked, cross-selling and
            mail-
            > order could boost the economy.
            >
            > Well that's far too much for one message! What do you think?
            >
            > Ricardo
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com, "Pamela McLean"
            > <pam54321@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Dear Dan
            > >
            > > Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles
            > are ... a
            > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
            > felt that
            > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the
            electoral
            > process."
            > >
            > >
            > > There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can
            > contribute..
            > >
            > > Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but
            > from a
            > > slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of
            > the future
            > > benefits of ICT.
            > >
            > > I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development,
            but
            > from a
            > > different starting point. I do not have any personal direct
            > connection with
            > > the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that
            > has relied
            > > on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to
            > gradual
            > > sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable
            > knowledge and
            > > experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to
            > share.
            > > However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way
            > Minciu Sodas
            > > works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way.
            > >
            > > Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and
            > activists - we are
            > > not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is
            > an "Orchard of
            > > Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-) We value ICT
            > because we know
            > > that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas
            > and
            > > information.
            > >
            > > In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the
            information
            > come
            > > first, and the technology follows - I think it is the other way
            > round in
            > > the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the
            > telecentres there
            > > is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to
            > work within
            > > Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because
            > there are
            > > paid jobs.
            > >
            > > I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can
            help
            > with
            > > development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my
            > impression that
            > > many people see computers as "something to learn" rather
            > than "something to
            > > use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should
            > breifly
            > > explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"
            > I.e. they
            > > have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job
            doing
            > word
            > > processing or accounts. I know other people who use computes in
            > their daily
            > > life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing
            > their minds
            > > and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers
            who
            > will
            > > really be change makers and benefit their local communities -
            not
            > just those
            > > who learn computers to get jobs.
            > >
            > > I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you
            bring
            > the
            > > knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with
            us.
            > Certainly
            > > the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of
            Peace
            > and I hope
            > > they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.
            > >
            > > Pam
            > >
            > > On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Pam,
            > > > We seem to be thinking about the same thing, and that is very
            > good.I also
            > > > concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The
            > bringadadge
            > > > that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which is
            > due to a
            > > > build-up of emotions over time.
            > > >
            > > > The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair.
            This
            > is a
            > > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who
            kindof
            > felt that
            > > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the
            electoral
            > > > process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching the
            > outcome of
            > > > the Mediation and should no appropriate solution bases on
            > justice and truth
            > > > not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged into the
            > Dark
            > > > ages. Woe unto Kenya if this ever happens.
            > > >
            > > > Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em
            is
            > a noble
            > > > idea of going about solving this problem.It is very true
            like
            > in n any
            > > > conflict, there is the presenting issue and the emmerging
            > issues. The
            > > > former in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while
            > the bigger
            > > > one is the myriad of injustices kenyans of different ethno-
            > political
            > > > persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of a
            > class
            > > > struggle.Too bad politics innkenya has been ethnicised.
            > > >
            > > > Am a very strong believer in ICT4D.Major world economies
            today
            > are
            > > > Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has
            already
            > become a
            > > > ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility they enjoy
            > after the
            > > > genocide? We cannot undescore the role of ICT in creation of
            > new jobs,
            > > > new markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions
            of
            > otherwise
            > > > idle Kenyan youths who only look at their- well -to -do
            > technosavy
            > > > relatives with jealosy. This is the basis of the vision of
            my
            > programme
            > > > *Reaching the Unreached.*
            > > > **
            > > > The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical
            > > > mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of
            land
            > for such
            > > > centres. Perhaps it would be good to try identify existing
            but
            > moribund
            > > > public structures like Playing fields, cooperative
            > societies ,Market places
            > > > etc, whie involving the local authorities so that the issue
            > of unlimited
            > > > acess and ownership is put into perspective.
            > > >
            > > > How about developing a project strategy that revovles around
            > several
            > > > activities as some practical steps :
            > > >
            > > > - Community mobilisation/awareness creation and marketing
            > > > - Developing Peace Centre specifications
            > > > - Sourcing and installing hardware equipment and software
            > > > - Recruitment of staff
            > > > - Development of local content taking into cognisance the
            > social
            > > > economic enviroment
            > > > - Business incubation ( a kind of informal sector business
            > > > institute )
            > > > - Strategies for sustainability
            > > > - Monitoring and evaluation of the Peace Centres
            > > >
            > > > The peace centres would be more of community resource
            > centres,
            > > > complete with several other activities for entertainment to
            > help in
            > > > bonding the youth towards progressive activities.
            > > >
            > > > Now the challange is how to get our act together while
            > appreciating
            > > > the different strengths each of us have ,develop some
            worklplan
            > and have
            > > > Those with a passion for this to coalesce around it .
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > *Pamela McLean <pam54321@>* wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Tom and everyone.
            > > >
            > > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given
            the
            > > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the
            > cause.Somehow we
            > > > have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
            > understand that
            > > > the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives
            much
            > of the
            > > > robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something
            > similar with the
            > > > killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very
            > terrible.)
            > > >
            > > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new
            > model for
            > > > the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
            > > >
            > > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague
            feeling
            > that in
            > > > the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of
            > public work in
            > > > the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work
            on
            > projects of
            > > > value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the
            > economy. Could
            > > > PoP initiate something similar?
            > > >
            > > > There has been much damage so there will need to be
            rebuilding.
            > What if
            > > > PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
            > started by
            > > > building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding
            > appropriate
            > > > sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find
            > money to feed
            > > > the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage.
            > Work also uses
            > > > energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and
            > productive work
            > > > gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be
            > first in line
            > > > as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities
            need
            > to be spread
            > > > as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual
            > gain - local
            > > > peopel will know how it should be done.
            > > >
            > > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on
            the
            > internet
            > > > for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to
            > begin with we
            > > > only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water
            > harvesting,
            > > > already familiar in Kenya). People will not be in the right
            > mood for
            > > > experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.
            > > >
            > > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary
            > shelter or
            > > > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would
            > of course
            > > > have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
            > phones
            > > > initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
            > connectivity.
            > > > The centres could gradually become centres of education and
            > training, as
            > > > well as sports and arts and general community centres - power
            > houses of
            > > > innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational
            > skiil
            > > > building, health education, enterprise development
            incorporating
            > micro
            > > > finance and other enabling services etc. They could also
            become
            > experimental
            > > > centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would
            all
            > be done
            > > > through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports
            > starts with a
            > > > couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so
            > on.
            > > >
            > > > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local
            > labour and
            > > > local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
            > slower results
            > > > and an approach that is initially low tech. However there
            > should be an
            > > > emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not
            > sustainable
            > > > should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace
            it.
            > Gradually
            > > > the centres should become models of excellence of local -
            really
            > local -
            > > > developments - locally individual solutions to local needs -
            but
            > with a
            > > > shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good
            > ides that
            > > > work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone
            can
            > learn from
            > > > them.
            > > >
            > > > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc
            once
            > the centre
            > > > was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
            > sustainable
            > > > housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
            > > >
            > > > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful
            > approach - not
            > > > some top down model.
            > > >
            > > > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed
            > into
            > > > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
            > > >
            > > > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this
            > afternoons
            > > > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
            > > >
            > > > Pam
            > > >
            > > > 07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Dear All,
            > > > > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
            > > > > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
            > > > > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
            > > > > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
            > > > > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
            > > > > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
            > > > > with noplacesof employment.
            > > > > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
            > > > > acentre.
            > > > > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
            > > > > with joytang about this.
            > > > > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownpor
            > > > > alliscalm..now day 6.
            > > > > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
            > > > > scholsare on.
            > > > > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
            > > > > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany..it
            > > > > wasanother violence.
            > > > > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
            > > > > 100yrsoldcity.
            > > > > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
            > > > > avictimof looting ..whilegand.invaded my house.
            > > > > Thisismuchidleness..lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
            > > > > people..and they willstopit...they just..got
            > > > > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
            > > > > aare jobless.
            > > > > Thanks
            > > > > TOM.
            > > > > -
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Dan Andrew Otedo
            > > > Administrator
            > > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
            > > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
            > > > Kenya
            > > > +254720366094
            > > >
            > > > ------------------------------
            > > > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
            > Mobile. Try it
            > > >
            >
            now.<http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51733/*http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=
            > Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ>
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • tom ochuka
            Dear Andrius, Ecconomically this cetre will not only be suplier but trainners on how tocreat wealth....likev disater prevention and management. Thanks JOy for
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 8, 2008
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              Dear Andrius,
              Ecconomically this cetre will not only be suplier but
              trainners on how tocreat wealth....likev disater
              prevention and management.
              Thanks JOy for the aiertine you sent to me..in kisumu
              cathedral we have idps from ..naivasha..this airtime
              helps race their relatives.
              Weare rasry inAhero..Ispoke with ken odhiss aand Ron
              about the centre they seem to beb very ready for our
              meeting.
              Andrius you can work on the tshirts and balls inthe
              nex budget.
              TOM OCHUKA.
              --- Andrius Kulikauskas <ms@...> wrote:

              > Henry Migingo +254 733 695 259,
              >
              > I send you Pamela McLean's wonderful and timely
              > letter. I ask your help
              > and all at John Roger's Cyfranogi working group.
              >
              > We need an immediate economic works program that
              > would include all idle
              > hands and provide the most basic needs for all
              > people, starting with
              > safety, water, food, shelter and up from there. We
              > need especially to
              > keep the young people busy.
              >
              > The work could be as simple as making footballs out
              > of plastic bags and
              > twine (as the Tanzanians do), mixed-tribe groups
              > escorting by foot
              > people to their homes (which might be thirty
              > kilometers away yet still
              > walkable with help and protection), entertaining
              > refugee children with
              > theater (as Repacted.org does), writing SMS messages
              > for peace. These
              > should be a Fun Works program because the biggest
              > threat now is a sour
              > attitude and idle hands.
              >
              > We need to draw and print a bill/coupon/script/ that
              > can be used. I
              > suggest that you have the youths hand draw the
              > bills. This is an honor
              > system. The bills can be small denominations such
              > as One Hour, they can
              > have the motto "Humanity before Politics", "Enemies
              > embracing enemies"
              > and they are issued by the "Pyramid of Peace and the
              > Circles of Justice"
              > (if Janet and all might approve I suggest the
              > "circles of justice" name
              > for our positive side of work, and I will defer to
              > her, but I am willing
              > to err in the meantime.)
              >
              > My thought is that our economics program be based on
              > "circles of
              > justice" until we can think of something better. We
              > look at our money
              > as a way to connect all so that all may be included
              > as equals with a
              > turn at control. And there are many interlinking
              > circles.
              >
              > The One Hour of Fun Time note means that you get it
              > for one hour of fun
              > work that you do, and you spend it on one hour of
              > fun enjoyment.
              >
              > The Peace Credit you earn when you send a text
              > message for peace and you
              > let us know we will give you enough to send two
              > more. Keep track of
              > your peace credits and we (Pyramid of Peace and
              > Circles of Justice) owe
              > you and will try to repay you or we stay in your
              > debt. This an
              > unsustainable system but that is OK, perhaps the
              > point.
              >
              > The Long Day of Hospitality means that you took care
              > of a person for one
              > day and provided them shelter and water and shared
              > your food with them.
              > You can trade it for another Long Day of
              > Hospitality. (This is an idea
              > from Mexico.)
              >
              > You get the idea. These notes can be hand drawn by
              > the children, they
              > can be photocopied, they can be abused. They are
              > there to encourage
              > sharing and action and asking for help and
              > responding. Blessed are
              > those who honor them. Please write that also:
              > Blessed are those who
              > honor me and my maker.
              >
              > Thank you, Kennedy Owino +254 723 568 251and Rachel
              > Wambui Kungu +254
              > 721 626 389 for your fantastic reports and sound
              > thinking and wonderful
              > leadership. I will send more money this evening to
              > Kennedy with
              > instructions, please I ask for help to all who might
              > send money to
              > ms@... by PayPal or the link at
              > http://www.pyramidofpeace.net or write
              > for details, we can accept credit cards and checks,
              > too.
              >
              > Janet and all, what do you think of Circles of
              > Justice? Does it speak to
              > the heart of your holistic vision? I say justice
              > instead of peace
              > because of our discussion that peace comes before
              > justice. We need
              > "just" enough short term peace so that we can work
              > "piece-by-piece" on
              > long term justice, thus healing. (Janet, you
              > influence me!)
              >
              > Andrius
              >
              > Andrius Kulikauskas
              > Pyramid of Peace
              > http://www.pyramidofpeace.net
              > Minciu Sodas
              > http://www.ms.lt
              > ms@...
              > +370 699 30003
              > Vilnius, Lithuania
              >
              > Pamela McLean wrote:
              > > Tom and everyone.
              > >
              > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election
              > turmoil has given the
              > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is
              > the cause.Somehow
              > > we have to create work for people - and not just
              > in Kenya. I
              > > understand that the anger and hopelssness of
              > unenemployed youth also
              > > drives much of the robbery and violence in
              > Nigeria. (It is probably
              > > something similar with the killings we have here,
              > and in many
              > > countries. It is very terrible.)
              > >
              > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic
              > growth - a new model
              > > for the future sustainability (and stablilty) of
              > the world.
              > >
              > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a
              > vague feeling that
              > > in the great depression of the 1930's, there was a
              > programme of public
              > > work in the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which
              > put people to work
              > > on projects of value to the community as a whole -
              > thus kick starting
              > > the economy. Could PoP initiate something
              > similar?
              > >
              > > There has been much damage so there will need to
              > be rebuilding. What
              > > if PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some
              > way? What if PoP
              > > started by building local Peace Centres. People
              > could start now,
              > > finding appropriate sites and starting to prepare
              > the ground. Somehow
              > > we must find money to feed the workers, even if at
              > first they could
              > > not be paid a wage. Work also uses energy and time
              > that can otherwise
              > > go on violence - and productive work gives purpose
              > and is a source of
              > > pride. Good workers would be first in line as paid
              > jobs begin to come
              > > through - but the opportunities need to be spread
              > as widely s possible
              > > for community benefit - not individual gain -
              > local peopel will know
              > > how it should be done.
              > >
              > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and
              > elsewhere on the
              > > internet for sustainable local solutions to
              > problems. I suggest that
              > > to begin with we only use well tried examples of
              > good practice (such
              > > as water harvesting, already familiar in Kenya).
              > People will not be
              > > in the right mood for experiments that may not
              > work. Experimentation
              > > can come later.
              > >
              > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide
              > temporary shelter or
              > > other facilities for displaced people if
              > necessary. They would of
              > > course have good communication links from the
              > start - thanks to PoP
              > > phones initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc;
              > and, later on, full
              > > connectivity. The centres could gradually become
              > centres of education
              > > and training, as well as sports and arts and
              > general community centres
              >
              === message truncated ===



              ____________________________________________________________________________________
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            • Dan Otedo
              Dear Pam and Ricardo, Your ideas have been quite edifying .Real Orchards of Thoughts and Ideas interwoven is a subtle way.And to say that i also keep
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 9, 2008
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                Dear Pam and Ricardo,
                Your ideas have been  quite edifying .Real Orchards of  Thoughts and Ideas  interwoven is a subtle way.And to say that  i also keep learning  is very true .
                 
                Pam  you observed right in a way that  the telecentre way is a top down rather  than a bottom  up sstrategy.  I have been looking at the  Telecentre cookbook cookbook@... and several other resourcs like  http//www.telecentres.org  and those  that reflect  on the African telecentre Experience.
                 
                I have reservations  of giving people  some tecnology which  they might find irrelevant ,innapropriate or overtaken by times. Pam  you have the experience  of Nigeria  and even Kenya , where   you have engaged  in empowering  teachers  in ICT skills.I have  done the same here. One  of the challanges has always been the  infrastructure and i think pooling resources comes second to none in Africa . The spotlight here  is  on peace and sustainable  utilisation  of ICT infarstructure to promote it. what a better way of spreading risks by ensuring community ownership  through  Peace Centres/Telecentres , Community information Communication technology centres .. whichever name  we have for them!
                 
                 One  thing which  did  not escape my  notice  is that  the Farmers cooperative Society  which  i will visit  on  tuesday  in the clash torn Eldama Ravine ,jealously kept out of harms way  ,the equipmennt they were  given by  our partner  organisation . This gave me the feelng that they valued  them very  much, but hardly appreciated   the oppprotunities  that come   with ICT.
                 
                 At  the moment am developing an appreciation mannual for the  for  the training  the management  of the  faclity and possibly reviewing  thier business plans  and  mobilise volunteers to   with day  to day running  of the same ,by incubating   some  ICT realed business tasks  for themselves. I also plan to take  the management  of the society  for a workshop at Egerton  University's  Dairy and Food Technology Deparment  to have them be abreast with  Scientific  management  of  enterprises.
                 
                 
                Richard  your idea  especially one page websites ,makinng  an income from computer related tasks , the   Minimalist Telecentres  is worth trying  out .
                I would prefer raising mones  and having  contributions directly  to CAWD  for such centres. We are yet to register a Trust or Charity.The Work at  hand  is a lot which  is very good .   
                 
                Perhaps am  torn between implemnting pre-planned projects  like these  funded by Microsoft upon invitation, and small beautiful  ones  that ooze from Orchards  of thought.I tell you this team here is very resilient ,creative and dymanic, something  lacking in NGO's  which  have a set   mind .
                 
                I will be  in touch with Mr Mark Matunga  of  microsoft  to engag  him  on what role  they can play  in. He  is  out of the country at the moment, but am staying  at  his house in Nairobi  at  the  moment. 
                ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@...> wrote:
                Hi Pam and Dan

                I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
                promote peace and provide work for local youths.

                Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
                centre being the most important things. That implies some money
                needs to be raised to start the centres.

                That can be broken down into :-

                1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).

                2. Inside/local funding.

                I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get onto
                the more desirable/sustainab le local funding.

                Possible outside funding sources:

                1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
                website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
                donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
                chequess, etc.

                2. Donations via Dan's charity/non- profit, registered in Kenya.

                Either of these could be promoted in the press by
                articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself Pam,
                by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
                potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
                biography. That would lead into an article about the existing peace
                work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
                dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the peace
                work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
                action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
                several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could finish
                with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
                written 'landing-page' , summarising the work and the peace centre
                concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
                be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other charities,
                Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.

                Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote Dan's
                organization.

                Other outside funding:

                Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
                Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
                Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at last
                and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
                Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
                fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in 2009.
                Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
                broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger Economy'
                like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').

                http://allafrica. com/stories/ 200802051178. html

                Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
                through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
                Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office programs,
                etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.

                Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
                sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
                centres.

                Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
                winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
                small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
                VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
                cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
                company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
                Centres/TeleCentres .

                Local funding:

                Offline local fund-raising events -

                a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local people
                to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
                wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
                opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace Centre.

                b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
                the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
                Nairobi.

                c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of the
                profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral marketing',
                so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.

                d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
                some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum of
                seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as an
                all-in-one printer/scanner/ photocopier for £40 or $80, making money
                just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
                provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
                photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
                earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
                computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/ Infrared link, and
                connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
                service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
                provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses for
                the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
                computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.

                The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
                before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.

                Income activities:

                One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
                one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar businesses,
                such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
                plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
                notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service details
                from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
                business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
                people and people further away can at least find that business and
                place orders by phone or know where they are from a simple map or
                address. The fee for creating the page could be split as income for
                the worker and for the Peace Centre. Its a good 'learning by doing'
                job-skill as well. The worker may use some of the money for more
                online time, for other things.

                Anything that stimulates the real offline economy is good. Maybe you
                can think of further examples, or the youths themselves can. They
                could even create the websites for free, just to help the local
                economy, and benefit indirectly. The businesses may offer them on-
                going website maintenance work, for this week's special offers.

                Broadcasting by Sneakernet:

                One scheme with multiple uses is to set up a 'broadcasting network'
                by CD, flash-drive, or cassette. Using a single PC or Laptop to
                prepare 'radio-programmes' , you could 'broadcast' to people with CD
                players, MP3 players, computers at other centres. This could be for
                peace discussion programmers, or raising people's awareness of ICT
                opportunities or ordinary work like brick-laying.

                Miscellaneous sales:

                If people learn how to produce simple websites, you can boost the
                local economy with free/paid small ads online, and printed as
                posters for those without computer access. In time, it may turn into
                a major auction site like eBay, that don't operate in Africa yet. If
                the sites from all Peace Centres were linked, cross-selling and mail-
                order could boost the economy.

                Well that's far too much for one message! What do you think?

                Ricardo

                --- In learningfromeachoth er@yahoogroups. com, "Pamela McLean"
                <pam54321@.. .> wrote:
                >
                > Dear Dan
                >
                > Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles
                are ... a
                > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                felt that
                > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                process."
                >
                >
                > There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can
                contribute..
                >
                > Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but
                from a
                > slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of
                the future
                > benefits of ICT.
                >
                > I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development, but
                from a
                > different starting point. I do not have any personal direct
                connection with
                > the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that
                has relied
                > on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to
                gradual
                > sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable
                knowledge and
                > experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to
                share.
                > However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way
                Minciu Sodas
                > works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way.
                >
                > Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and
                activists - we are
                > not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is
                an "Orchard of
                > Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-) We value ICT
                because we know
                > that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas
                and
                > information.
                >
                > In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the information
                come
                > first, and the technology follows - I think it is the other way
                round in
                > the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the
                telecentres there
                > is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to
                work within
                > Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because
                there are
                > paid jobs.
                >
                > I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can help
                with
                > development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my
                impression that
                > many people see computers as "something to learn" rather
                than "something to
                > use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should
                breifly
                > explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"
                I.e. they
                > have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job doing
                word
                > processing or accounts. I know other people who use computes in
                their daily
                > life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing
                their minds
                > and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers who
                will
                > really be change makers and benefit their local communities - not
                just those
                > who learn computers to get jobs.
                >
                > I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you bring
                the
                > knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with us.
                Certainly
                > the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of Peace
                and I hope
                > they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.
                >
                > Pam
                >
                > On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Pam,
                > > We seem to be thinking about the same thing, and that is very
                good.I also
                > > concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The
                bringadadge
                > > that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which is
                due to a
                > > build-up of emotions over time.
                > >
                > > The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair. This
                is a
                > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                felt that
                > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                > > process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching the
                outcome of
                > > the Mediation and should no appropriate solution bases on
                justice and truth
                > > not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged into the
                Dark
                > > ages. Woe unto Kenya if this ever happens.
                > >
                > > Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em is
                a noble
                > > idea of going about solving this problem.It is very true like
                in n any
                > > conflict, there is the presenting issue and the emmerging
                issues. The
                > > former in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while
                the bigger
                > > one is the myriad of injustices kenyans of different ethno-
                political
                > > persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of a
                class
                > > struggle.Too bad politics innkenya has been ethnicised.
                > >
                > > Am a very strong believer in ICT4D.Major world economies today
                are
                > > Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has already
                become a
                > > ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility they enjoy
                after the
                > > genocide? We cannot undescore the role of ICT in creation of
                new jobs,
                > > new markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions of
                otherwise
                > > idle Kenyan youths who only look at their- well -to -do
                technosavy
                > > relatives with jealosy. This is the basis of the vision of my
                programme
                > > *Reaching the Unreached.*
                > > **
                > > The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical
                > > mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of land
                for such
                > > centres. Perhaps it would be good to try identify existing but
                moribund
                > > public structures like Playing fields, cooperative
                societies ,Market places
                > > etc, whie involving the local authorities so that the issue
                of unlimited
                > > acess and ownership is put into perspective.
                > >
                > > How about developing a project strategy that revovles around
                several
                > > activities as some practical steps :
                > >
                > > - Community mobilisation/ awareness creation and marketing
                > > - Developing Peace Centre specifications
                > > - Sourcing and installing hardware equipment and software
                > > - Recruitment of staff
                > > - Development of local content taking into cognisance the
                social
                > > economic enviroment
                > > - Business incubation ( a kind of informal sector business
                > > institute )
                > > - Strategies for sustainability
                > > - Monitoring and evaluation of the Peace Centres
                > >
                > > The peace centres would be more of community resource
                centres,
                > > complete with several other activities for entertainment to
                help in
                > > bonding the youth towards progressive activities.
                > >
                > > Now the challange is how to get our act together while
                appreciating
                > > the different strengths each of us have ,develop some worklplan
                and have
                > > Those with a passion for this to coalesce around it .
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > *Pamela McLean <pam54321@.. .>* wrote:
                > >
                > > Tom and everyone.
                > >
                > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the
                > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the
                cause.Somehow we
                > > have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
                understand that
                > > the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives much
                of the
                > > robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something
                similar with the
                > > killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very
                terrible.)
                > >
                > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new
                model for
                > > the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
                > >
                > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling
                that in
                > > the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of
                public work in
                > > the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work on
                projects of
                > > value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the
                economy. Could
                > > PoP initiate something similar?
                > >
                > > There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding.
                What if
                > > PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
                started by
                > > building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding
                appropriate
                > > sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find
                money to feed
                > > the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage.
                Work also uses
                > > energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and
                productive work
                > > gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be
                first in line
                > > as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities need
                to be spread
                > > as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual
                gain - local
                > > peopel will know how it should be done.
                > >
                > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the
                internet
                > > for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to
                begin with we
                > > only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water
                harvesting,
                > > already familiar in Kenya). People will not be in the right
                mood for
                > > experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.
                > >
                > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary
                shelter or
                > > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would
                of course
                > > have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
                phones
                > > initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
                connectivity.
                > > The centres could gradually become centres of education and
                training, as
                > > well as sports and arts and general community centres - power
                houses of
                > > innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational
                skiil
                > > building, health education, enterprise development incorporating
                micro
                > > finance and other enabling services etc. They could also become
                experimental
                > > centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would all
                be done
                > > through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports
                starts with a
                > > couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so
                on.
                > >
                > > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local
                labour and
                > > local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
                slower results
                > > and an approach that is initially low tech. However there
                should be an
                > > emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not
                sustainable
                > > should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace it.
                Gradually
                > > the centres should become models of excellence of local - really
                local -
                > > developments - locally individual solutions to local needs - but
                with a
                > > shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good
                ides that
                > > work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone can
                learn from
                > > them.
                > >
                > > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once
                the centre
                > > was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
                sustainable
                > > housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
                > >
                > > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful
                approach - not
                > > some top down model.
                > >
                > > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed
                into
                > > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
                > >
                > > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this
                afternoons
                > > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
                > >
                > > Pam
                > >
                > > 07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@. ..> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Dear All,
                > > > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
                > > > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
                > > > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
                > > > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
                > > > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
                > > > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
                > > > with noplacesof employment.
                > > > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
                > > > acentre.
                > > > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
                > > > with joytang about this.
                > > > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownp or
                > > > alliscalm..now day 6.
                > > > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
                > > > scholsare on.
                > > > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
                > > > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany. .it
                > > > wasanother violence.
                > > > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
                > > > 100yrsoldcity.
                > > > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
                > > > avictimof looting ..whilegand. invaded my house.
                > > > Thisismuchidleness. .lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
                > > > people..and they willstopit.. .they just..got
                > > > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
                > > > aare jobless.
                > > > Thanks
                > > > TOM.
                > > > -
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Dan Andrew Otedo
                > > Administrator
                > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                > > Kenya
                > > +254720366094
                > >
                > > ------------ --------- ---------
                > > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
                Mobile. Try it
                > >
                now.<http://us.rd. yahoo.com/ evt=51733/ *http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=
                Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao 8Wcj9tAcJ>
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >




                Dan Andrew Otedo
                Administrator
                Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                Kenya
                +254720366094


                Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

              • Janet Feldman
                Dear Dan and All, It is wonderful to hear from you, and your mention of telecenters and resources abt them brings to mind what is available at the Development
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 9, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Dear Dan and All,
                   
                  It is wonderful to hear from you, and your mention of telecenters and resources abt them brings to mind what is available at the Development Gateway (www.developmentgateway.org), as well as Telecentre.org (www.telecentre.org)  and UgaBYTES (www.ugabytes.org).
                   
                  Having had some experience in Kenya in terms of ICTs, esp what is relevant to individuals and communities for their daily lives, I would say that we at KAIPPG have found radio, video, cassettes and recorders, and phones (both mobile and also commercial) to be tools which provide immediate and extensive benefits.
                   
                  Some computers are great to have, esp if one has Internet connections (which are slowly being extended into rural areas), and radios can be Internet-enabled too, as well as being solar-rechargeable.
                   
                  KAIPPG has developed a system of development communication which involves a centrally-located telecommunity center, with  kiosks in various other locations throughout the districts we serve, and integrated with radio, mobile phone, and video communication capabilities, supplemented also with arts for communication purposes.
                   
                  This seems to work well in part because these "lower-tech" ICTs are more readily available in rural areas, and in part because they can be shared by a large number of people, hence less upset/jealousy that some individuals or communities are being served while others are not.
                   
                  I think it's great to develop an ICTs manual, and also link trainings and other activities to a university or educational institution of some kind. Egerton is excellent, because of the agricultural, ICTs, and other progressive work they do.
                   
                  There is an interesting opportunity linked to Microsoft--on youth leadership and ICTs--which I will post here today, upon seeing what you have written below abt your connection to a Microsoft rep in Kenya.
                   
                  It would be great if Peace Centers could take advantage of--and be integrated into--already existing programs and types of ICTs usage, from telecenters to kiosks, from "listening groups" (radio) and radio stations to schools, from local nonprofits to national branches of international organizations (Actionaid, CARE, UNICEF, VSO, FHI, PATH, and more).
                   
                  With thanks for all of your great work, and excitement about the possibilities ahead! Janet
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Dan Otedo
                  Sent: Saturday, February 09, 2008 8:59 AM
                  Subject: Re: [learningfromeachother] Re: Building the economy through Peace Centres.

                  Dear Pam and Ricardo,
                  Your ideas have been  quite edifying .Real Orchards of  Thoughts and Ideas  interwoven is a subtle way.And to say that  i also keep learning  is very true .
                   
                  Pam  you observed right in a way that  the telecentre way is a top down rather  than a bottom  up sstrategy.  I have been looking at the  Telecentre cookbook cookbook@... and several other resourcs like  http//www.telecentres.org  and those  that reflect  on the African telecentre Experience.
                   
                  I have reservations  of giving people  some tecnology which  they might find irrelevant ,innapropriate or overtaken by times. Pam  you have the experience  of Nigeria  and even Kenya , where   you have engaged  in empowering  teachers  in ICT skills.I have  done the same here. One  of the challanges has always been the  infrastructure and i think pooling resources comes second to none in Africa . The spotlight here  is  on peace and sustainable  utilisation  of ICT infarstructure to promote it. what a better way of spreading risks by ensuring community ownership  through  Peace Centres/Telecentres , Community information Communication technology centres .. whichever name  we have for them!
                   
                   One  thing which  did  not escape my  notice  is that  the Farmers cooperative Society  which  i will visit  on  tuesday  in the clash torn Eldama Ravine ,jealously kept out of harms way  ,the equipmennt they were  given by  our partner  organisation . This gave me the feelng that they valued  them very  much, but hardly appreciated   the oppprotunities  that come   with ICT.
                   
                   At  the moment am developing an appreciation mannual for the  for  the training  the management  of the  faclity and possibly reviewing  thier business plans  and  mobilise volunteers to   with day  to day running  of the same ,by incubating   some  ICT realed business tasks  for themselves. I also plan to take  the management  of the society  for a workshop at Egerton  University's  Dairy and Food Technology Deparment  to have them be abreast with  Scientific  management  of  enterprises.
                   
                   
                  Richard  your idea  especially one page websites ,makinng  an income from computer related tasks , the   Minimalist Telecentres  is worth trying  out .
                  I would prefer raising mones  and having  contributions directly  to CAWD  for such centres. We are yet to register a Trust or Charity.The Work at  hand  is a lot which  is very good .   
                   
                  Perhaps am  torn between implemnting pre-planned projects  like these  funded by Microsoft upon invitation, and small beautiful  ones  that ooze from Orchards  of thought.I tell you this team here is very resilient ,creative and dymanic, something  lacking in NGO's  which  have a set   mind .
                   
                  I will be  in touch with Mr Mark Matunga  of  microsoft  to engag  him  on what role  they can play  in. He  is  out of the country at the moment, but am staying  at  his house in Nairobi  at  the  moment. 
                  ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@...> wrote:
                  Hi Pam and Dan

                  I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
                  promote peace and provide work for local youths.

                  Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
                  centre being the most important things. That implies some money
                  needs to be raised to start the centres.

                  That can be broken down into :-

                  1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).

                  2. Inside/local funding.

                  I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get onto
                  the more desirable/sustainab le local funding.

                  Possible outside funding sources:

                  1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
                  website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
                  donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
                  chequess, etc.

                  2. Donations via Dan's charity/non- profit, registered in Kenya.

                  Either of these could be promoted in the press by
                  articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself Pam,
                  by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
                  potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
                  biography. That would lead into an article about the existing peace
                  work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
                  dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the peace
                  work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
                  action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
                  several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could finish
                  with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
                  written 'landing-page' , summarising the work and the peace centre
                  concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
                  be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other charities,
                  Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.

                  Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote Dan's
                  organization.

                  Other outside funding:

                  Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
                  Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
                  Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at last
                  and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
                  Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
                  fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in 2009.
                  Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
                  broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger Economy'
                  like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').

                  http://allafrica. com/stories/ 200802051178. html

                  Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
                  through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
                  Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office programs,
                  etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.

                  Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
                  sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
                  centres.

                  Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
                  winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
                  small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
                  VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
                  cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
                  company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
                  Centres/TeleCentres .

                  Local funding:

                  Offline local fund-raising events -

                  a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local people
                  to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
                  wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
                  opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace Centre.

                  b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
                  the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
                  Nairobi.

                  c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of the
                  profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral marketing',
                  so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.

                  d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
                  some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum of
                  seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as an
                  all-in-one printer/scanner/ photocopier for £40 or $80, making money
                  just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
                  provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
                  photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
                  earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
                  computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/ Infrared link, and
                  connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
                  service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
                  provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses for
                  the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
                  computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.

                  The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
                  before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.

                  Income activities:

                  One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
                  one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar businesses,
                  such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
                  plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
                  notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service details
                  from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
                  business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
                  people and people further away can at least find that business and
                  place orders by phone or know where they are from a simple map or
                  address. The fee for creating the page could be split as income for
                  the worker and for the Peace Centre. Its a good 'learning by doing'
                  job-skill as well. The worker may use some of the money for more
                  online time, for other things.

                  Anything that stimulates the real offline economy is good. Maybe you
                  can think of further examples, or the youths themselves can. They
                  could even create the websites for free, just to help the local
                  economy, and benefit indirectly. The businesses may offer them on-
                  going website maintenance work, for this week's special offers.

                  Broadcasting by Sneakernet:

                  One scheme with multiple uses is to set up a 'broadcasting network'
                  by CD, flash-drive, or cassette. Using a single PC or Laptop to
                  prepare 'radio-programmes' , you could 'broadcast' to people with CD
                  players, MP3 players, computers at other centres. This could be for
                  peace discussion programmers, or raising people's awareness of ICT
                  opportunities or ordinary work like brick-laying.

                  Miscellaneous sales:

                  If people learn how to produce simple websites, you can boost the
                  local economy with free/paid small ads online, and printed as
                  posters for those without computer access. In time, it may turn into
                  a major auction site like eBay, that don't operate in Africa yet. If
                  the sites from all Peace Centres were linked, cross-selling and mail-
                  order could boost the economy.

                  Well that's far too much for one message! What do you think?

                  Ricardo

                  --- In learningfromeachoth er@yahoogroups. com, "Pamela McLean"
                  <pam54321@.. .> wrote:
                  >
                  > Dear Dan
                  >
                  > Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles
                  are ... a
                  > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                  felt that
                  > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                  process."
                  >
                  >
                  > There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can
                  contribute..
                  >
                  > Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but
                  from a
                  > slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of
                  the future
                  > benefits of ICT.
                  >
                  > I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development, but
                  from a
                  > different starting point. I do not have any personal direct
                  connection with
                  > the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that
                  has relied
                  > on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to
                  gradual
                  > sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable
                  knowledge and
                  > experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to
                  share.
                  > However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way
                  Minciu Sodas
                  > works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way.
                  >
                  > Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and
                  activists - we are
                  > not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is
                  an "Orchard of
                  > Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-) We value ICT
                  because we know
                  > that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas
                  and
                  > information.
                  >
                  > In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the information
                  come
                  > first, and the technology follows - I think it is the other way
                  round in
                  > the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the
                  telecentres there
                  > is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to
                  work within
                  > Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because
                  there are
                  > paid jobs.
                  >
                  > I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can help
                  with
                  > development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my
                  impression that
                  > many people see computers as "something to learn" rather
                  than "something to
                  > use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should
                  breifly
                  > explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"
                  I.e. they
                  > have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job doing
                  word
                  > processing or accounts. I know other people who use computes in
                  their daily
                  > life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing
                  their minds
                  > and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers who
                  will
                  > really be change makers and benefit their local communities - not
                  just those
                  > who learn computers to get jobs.
                  >
                  > I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you bring
                  the
                  > knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with us.
                  Certainly
                  > the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of Peace
                  and I hope
                  > they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.
                  >
                  > Pam
                  >
                  > On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Pam,
                  > > We seem to be thinking about the same thing, and that is very
                  good.I also
                  > > concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The
                  bringadadge
                  > > that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which is
                  due to a
                  > > build-up of emotions over time.
                  > >
                  > > The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair. This
                  is a
                  > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                  felt that
                  > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                  > > process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching the
                  outcome of
                  > > the Mediation and should no appropriate solution bases on
                  justice and truth
                  > > not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged into the
                  Dark
                  > > ages. Woe unto Kenya if this ever happens.
                  > >
                  > > Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em is
                  a noble
                  > > idea of going about solving this problem.It is very true like
                  in n any
                  > > conflict, there is the presenting issue and the emmerging
                  issues. The
                  > > former in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while
                  the bigger
                  > > one is the myriad of injustices kenyans of different ethno-
                  political
                  > > persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of a
                  class
                  > > struggle.Too bad politics innkenya has been ethnicised.
                  > >
                  > > Am a very strong believer in ICT4D.Major world economies today
                  are
                  > > Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has already
                  become a
                  > > ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility they enjoy
                  after the
                  > > genocide? We cannot undescore the role of ICT in creation of
                  new jobs,
                  > > new markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions of
                  otherwise
                  > > idle Kenyan youths who only look at their- well -to -do
                  technosavy
                  > > relatives with jealosy. This is the basis of the vision of my
                  programme
                  > > *Reaching the Unreached.*
                  > > **
                  > > The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical
                  > > mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of land
                  for such
                  > > centres. Perhaps it would be good to try identify existing but
                  moribund
                  > > public structures like Playing fields, cooperative
                  societies ,Market places
                  > > etc, whie involving the local authorities so that the issue
                  of unlimited
                  > > acess and ownership is put into perspective.
                  > >
                  > > How about developing a project strategy that revovles around
                  several
                  > > activities as some practical steps :
                  > >
                  > > - Community mobilisation/ awareness creation and marketing
                  > > - Developing Peace Centre specifications
                  > > - Sourcing and installing hardware equipment and software
                  > > - Recruitment of staff
                  > > - Development of local content taking into cognisance the
                  social
                  > > economic enviroment
                  > > - Business incubation ( a kind of informal sector business
                  > > institute )
                  > > - Strategies for sustainability
                  > > - Monitoring and evaluation of the Peace Centres
                  > >
                  > > The peace centres would be more of community resource
                  centres,
                  > > complete with several other activities for entertainment to
                  help in
                  > > bonding the youth towards progressive activities.
                  > >
                  > > Now the challange is how to get our act together while
                  appreciating
                  > > the different strengths each of us have ,develop some worklplan
                  and have
                  > > Those with a passion for this to coalesce around it .
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > *Pamela McLean <pam54321@.. .>* wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Tom and everyone.
                  > >
                  > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the
                  > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the
                  cause.Somehow we
                  > > have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
                  understand that
                  > > the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives much
                  of the
                  > > robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something
                  similar with the
                  > > killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very
                  terrible.)
                  > >
                  > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new
                  model for
                  > > the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
                  > >
                  > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling
                  that in
                  > > the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of
                  public work in
                  > > the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work on
                  projects of
                  > > value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the
                  economy. Could
                  > > PoP initiate something similar?
                  > >
                  > > There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding.
                  What if
                  > > PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
                  started by
                  > > building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding
                  appropriate
                  > > sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find
                  money to feed
                  > > the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage.
                  Work also uses
                  > > energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and
                  productive work
                  > > gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be
                  first in line
                  > > as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities need
                  to be spread
                  > > as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual
                  gain - local
                  > > peopel will know how it should be done.
                  > >
                  > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the
                  internet
                  > > for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to
                  begin with we
                  > > only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water
                  harvesting,
                  > > already familiar in Kenya). People will not be in the right
                  mood for
                  > > experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.
                  > >
                  > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary
                  shelter or
                  > > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would
                  of course
                  > > have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
                  phones
                  > > initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
                  connectivity.
                  > > The centres could gradually become centres of education and
                  training, as
                  > > well as sports and arts and general community centres - power
                  houses of
                  > > innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational
                  skiil
                  > > building, health education, enterprise development incorporating
                  micro
                  > > finance and other enabling services etc. They could also become
                  experimental
                  > > centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would all
                  be done
                  > > through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports
                  starts with a
                  > > couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so
                  on.
                  > >
                  > > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local
                  labour and
                  > > local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
                  slower results
                  > > and an approach that is initially low tech. However there
                  should be an
                  > > emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not
                  sustainable
                  > > should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace it.
                  Gradually
                  > > the centres should become models of excellence of local - really
                  local -
                  > > developments - locally individual solutions to local needs - but
                  with a
                  > > shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good
                  ides that
                  > > work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone can
                  learn from
                  > > them.
                  > >
                  > > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once
                  the centre
                  > > was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
                  sustainable
                  > > housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
                  > >
                  > > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful
                  approach - not
                  > > some top down model.
                  > >
                  > > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed
                  into
                  > > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
                  > >
                  > > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this
                  afternoons
                  > > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
                  > >
                  > > Pam
                  > >
                  > > 07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@. ..> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Dear All,
                  > > > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
                  > > > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
                  > > > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
                  > > > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
                  > > > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
                  > > > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
                  > > > with noplacesof employment.
                  > > > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
                  > > > acentre.
                  > > > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
                  > > > with joytang about this.
                  > > > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownp or
                  > > > alliscalm..now day 6.
                  > > > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
                  > > > scholsare on.
                  > > > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
                  > > > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany. .it
                  > > > wasanother violence.
                  > > > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
                  > > > 100yrsoldcity.
                  > > > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
                  > > > avictimof looting ..whilegand. invaded my house.
                  > > > Thisismuchidleness. .lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
                  > > > people..and they willstopit.. .they just..got
                  > > > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
                  > > > aare jobless.
                  > > > Thanks
                  > > > TOM.
                  > > > -
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Dan Andrew Otedo
                  > > Administrator
                  > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                  > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                  > > Kenya
                  > > +254720366094
                  > >
                  > > ------------ --------- ---------
                  > > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
                  Mobile. Try it
                  > >
                  now.<http://us.rd. yahoo.com/ evt=51733/ *http://mobile. yahoo.com/ ;_ylt=
                  Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao 8Wcj9tAcJ>
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >




                  Dan Andrew Otedo
                  Administrator
                  Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                  P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                  Kenya
                  +254720366094


                  Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

                • Pamela McLean
                  Hi Don Ricardo and everyone. I appreciate your discussions and ideas. I agree that lack of infrasturcture is a major problem - but there are ways around that
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 10, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Don Ricardo and everyone.

                    I appreciate your discussions and ideas.

                    I agree that lack of infrasturcture is a major problem - but there are ways around that until it comes. We don't have to wait until the infrastructure is there before we start doing ICT related things and Peace centre things. There are various work-arounds that can be used to enable communication to happen and information to be used. I think if we start to work then the technology will follow us. I agree wtih Don that it is important to keep things on a small enough scale so that there is no jealously about one place getting more that another.

                    Regarding how we get the technology I think of the ICT4D checklist -  Information, Communication, Technology for Development.

                    I think of what we are already doing.
                    • Information - We already have information needs and we are addressing them.
                    • Communication - We have a fantastic network of people who are communicating
                    • Technology - We don't wait until we have a top-down centre provided - we get on and try to squeeze every last drop of potential out of what we have. If we don't have a local Internet connection then we  make do with flash drives or phones to extend beyond the reach of the cyber cafes. We work on local work-arounds, (friendly cyber cafe managers, and motorpark drivers in Nigeria) Sneakernets and Includers soon, laptops and flash drives now. 
                    • Development - we are doing it.
                    ICT4D projects only work if they can tick all four boxes - I and C and T and D. Lots of them focus too much on the Technology and do not bring in all the rest properly. An ICT4D project which is only resting  on the Technology is like a person perching on a stool which only has one leg instead of three. It is going to fall over.

                    Our projects do tick all the boxes. As long as we build carefully they will succeed. If the technology providers have any sense or imagination they will start to queue up to work with us - because we are the people who can demonstrate what the technology can really do. 

                    I will "get on my soap box" - In my opinion too many projects that are top-down technology-driven projects are "empty". The computers are there, the VSATs are there, sometimes even the people are there. (Some people may only be there for "the three Gs" Girls, Games, and Gambling. Others may be more serious learning to be computer operators, or doing word processing or spreadsheets exercises. A few may be usign it seriously). But how much real information is there? Where is the information like we have buzzing around in Mincius Sodas, supporting the Pyramid of Peace, finding ways to enable the young people planning  future opportunities and  training - doing things that are needs-driven?

                    Some computers look fine but they are empty of real information. They are empty, and therefore of no use, like a plate may be empty, with no food on it. An empty plate is fine if you are not hungry for food. An empty computer is fine if you are not hungry for information. But really - if the plate or computer is empty -  what is the point in having it?

                    Let our PoP youth demonstrate true hunger for information and training without waiting for a top-down centre. Then I believe the technology to deliver teh information and training better will follow. The people who make the technology start off with the equivalent of "empty plates". They benefit from working with people like us, because we can show how the technology can perform when it is "full of good things". We need to use the ICT we have got (SMS, phots, emails, chatroom, wiki) to show how information hungry and hardworking the  youths can be.

                    Let them learn the practicalities of old fashioned pen and paper bookkeeping and business plans first, then, when they do get a computer to do it they will better understand what the figures are all about, and how the computer helps. Meanwhile they can surely get a simple calculator. People have been keeping detailed records since long before electronic calculators and computers were around. It is much more important to get started on the thinking and planning skills than it is to getn started on the computeriisation of the figures..

                    RIcardo, you mentioned CAWD and my Teachers Talking work. I think I should clarify that CAWD and Teachers Talking are separate.

                    CAWD is small registered UK charity. I am a trustee. We could certainly use CAWD to process funds for Peace Centres. It has the right structures in place. That is why when David got his funding from COL (Commonwealth of Learning) for his first project he did it under the umbrella of CAWD. It was a COL/CAWD/CLICC project which comes to an end of its funding in a couple of month time.

                    I got involved with CAWD before it was a registered charity. It was set up  by the late Peter Adetunji Oyawale, whose widow, Agnita is a close friend of mine. My practical grass-roots involvement with CAWD was largely in Peter's home area in Oyo State. I am no longer involved in that although I still have ties of friendship.

                    CAWD does not currently have a fundraiser, so it is not getting new money in at present, so people should not approach it for support.

                    Teachers Talking is my own personal project as an ICT4Ed&D practitioner. I started to develop it in 2004 at the request of my friend John Dada, to present at Fantsuam Foundation. I ran the TT course in Kenya for David pro-bono because of the work we had done together in Nigeria. It was a personal gift in kind, because David was trying to set up something new which I wanted to support.

                    Hope that clears the confusion.

                    If any of the training that I have developed through the TT programme is of benefit to the Peace Centres I will do my best to share it there as well.

                    Pam

                    On 09/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:

                    Dear Pam and Ricardo,
                    Your ideas have been  quite edifying .Real Orchards of  Thoughts and Ideas  interwoven is a subtle way.And to say that  i also keep learning  is very true .
                     
                    Pam  you observed right in a way that  the telecentre way is a top down rather  than a bottom  up sstrategy.  I have been looking at the  Telecentre cookbook cookbook@... and several other resourcs like  http//www.telecentres.org  and those  that reflect  on the African telecentre Experience.
                     
                    I have reservations  of giving people  some tecnology which  they might find irrelevant ,innapropriate or overtaken by times. Pam  you have the experience  of Nigeria  and even Kenya , where   you have engaged  in empoweri ng  teachers  in ICT skills.I have  done the same here. One  of the challanges has always been the  infrastructure and i think pooling resources comes second to none in Africa . The spotlight here  is  on peace and sustainable  utilisation  of ICT infarstructure to promote it. what a better way of spreading risks by ensuring community ownership  through  Peace Centres/Telecentres , Community information Communication technology centres .. whichever name  we have for them!
                     
                     One  thing which  did  not escape my  notice  is that  the Farmers cooperative Society  which  i will visit  on  tuesday  in the clash torn Eldama Ravine ,jealously kept out of harms way  ,the equipmennt they were  given by  our partner  organisation . This gave me the feelng that they valued  them very  much, but hardly appreciated   the oppprotunities  that come   with ICT.
                     
                     At  the moment am developing an appreciation mannual for the  for  the training  the management  of the  faclity and possibly reviewing  thier business plans  and  mobilise volunteers to   with day  to day running  of the same ,by incubating   some  ICT realed business tasks  for themselves. I also plan to take  the management  of the society  for a workshop at Egerton  University's  Dairy and Food Technology Deparment  to have them be abreast with  Scientific  management  of  enterprises.
                     
                     
                    Richard  your idea  especially one page websites ,makinng  an income from computer related tasks , the   Minimalist Telecentres  is worth trying  out .
                    I would prefer raising mones  and having  contributions directly  to CAWD  for such centres. We are yet to register a Trust or Charity.The Work at  hand  is a lot which  is very good .   
                     
                    Perhaps am  torn between implemnting pre-planned projects  like these  funded by Microsoft upon invitation, and small beautiful  ones  that ooze from Orchards  of thought.I tell you this team here is very resilient ,creative and dymanic, something  lacking in NGO's  which  have a set   mind .
                     
                    I will be  in touch with Mr Mark Matunga  of  microsoft  to engag  him  on what role  they can play  in. He  is  out of the country at the moment, but am staying  at  his house in Nairobi  at  the  moment. 
                    ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@...> wrote:
                    Hi Pam and Dan

                    I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
                    promote peace and provide work for local youths.

                    Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
                    centre being the most important things. That implies some money
                    needs to be raised to start the centres.

                    That can be broken down into :-

                    1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).

                    2. Inside/local funding.

                    I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get onto
                    the more desirable/sustainable local funding.

                    Possible outside funding sources:

                    1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
                    website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
                    donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
                    chequess, etc.

                    2. Donations via Dan's charity/non-profit, registered in Kenya.

                    Either of these could be promoted in the press by
                    articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself Pam,
                    by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
                    potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
                    biography. That would lead into an article about the existing peace
                    work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
                    dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the peace
                    work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
                    action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
                    several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could finish
                    with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
                    written 'landing-page', summarising the work and the peace centre
                    concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
                    be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other charities,
                    Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.

                    Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote Dan's
                    organization.

                    Other outside funding:

                    Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
                    Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
                    Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at last
                    and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
                    Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
                    fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in 2009.
                    Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
                    broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger Economy'
                    like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').

                    http://allafrica.com/stories/200802051178.html

                    Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
                    through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
                    Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office programs,
                    etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.

                    Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
                    sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
                    centres.

                    Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
                    winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
                    small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
                    VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
                    cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
                    company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
                    Centres/TeleCentres.

                    Local funding:

                    Offline local fund-raising events -

                    a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local people
                    to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
                    wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
                    opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace Centre.

                    b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
                    the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
                    Nairobi.

                    c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of the
                    profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral marketing',
                    so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.

                    d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
                    some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum of
                    seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as an
                    all-in-one printer/scanner/photocopier for £40 or $80, making money
                    just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
                    provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
                    photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
                    earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
                    computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/Infrared link, and
                    connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
                    service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
                    provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses for
                    the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
                    computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.

                    The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
                    before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.

                    Income activities:

                    One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
                    one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar businesses,
                    such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
                    plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
                    notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service details
                    from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
                    business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
                    people and people further away can at least find that business and
                    place orders by phone or know where they are from a simple map or
                    address. The fee for creating the page could be split as income for
                    the worker and for the Peace Centre. Its a good 'learning by doing'
                    job-skill as well. The worker may use some of the money for more
                    online time, for other things.

                    Anything that stimulates the real offline economy is good. Maybe you
                    can think of further examples, or the youths themselves can. They
                    could even create the websites for free, just to help the local
                    economy, and benefit indirectly. The businesses may offer them on-
                    going website maintenance work, for this week's special offers.

                    Broadcasting by Sneakernet:

                    One scheme with multiple uses is to set up a 'broadcasting network'
                    by CD, flash-drive, or cassette. Using a single PC or Laptop to
                    prepare 'radio-programmes', you could 'broadcast' to people with CD
                    players, MP3 players, computers at other centres. This could be for
                    peace discussion programmers, or raising people's awareness of ICT
                    opportunities or ordinary work like brick-laying.

                    Miscellaneous sales:

                    If people learn how to produce simple websites, you can boost the
                    local economy with free/paid small ads online, and printed as
                    posters for those without computer access. In time, it may turn into
                    a major auction site like eBay, that don't operate in Africa yet. If
                    the sites from all Peace Centres were linked, cross-selling and mail-
                    order could boost the economy.

                    Well that's far too much for one message! What do you think?

                    Ricardo

                    --- In learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com, "Pamela McLean"
                    <pam54321@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Dear Dan
                    >
                    > Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles
                    are ... a
                    > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                    felt that
                    > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                    process."
                    >
                    >
                    > There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can
                    contribute..
                    >
                    > Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but
                    from a
                    > slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of
                    the future
                    > benefits of ICT.
                    >
                    > I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development, but
                    from a
                    > different starting point. I do not have any personal direct
                    connection with
                    > the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that
                    has relied
                    > on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to
                    gradual
                    > sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable
                    knowledge and
                    > experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to
                    share.
                    > However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way
                    Minciu Sodas
                    > works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way.
                    >
                    > Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and
                    activists - we are
                    > not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is
                    an "Orchard of
                    > Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-) We value ICT
                    because we know
                    > that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas
                    and
                    > information.
                    >
                    > In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the information
                    come
                    > first, and the technology follows - I think it is the other way
                    round in
                    > the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the
                    telecentres there
                    > is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to
                    work within
                    > Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because
                    there are
                    > paid jobs.
                    >
                    > I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can help
                    with
                    > development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my
                    impression that
                    > many people see computers as "something to learn" rather
                    than "something to
                    > use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should
                    breifly
                    > explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"
                    I.e. they
                    > have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job doing
                    word
                    > processing or accounts. I know other people who use computes in
                    their daily
                    > life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing
                    their minds
                    > and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers who
                    will
                    > really be change makers and benefit their local communities - not
                    just those
                    > who learn computers to get jobs.
                    >
                    > I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you bring
                    the
                    > knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with us.
                    Certainly
                    > the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of Peace
                    and I hope
                    > they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.
                    >
                    > Pam
                    >
                    > On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Pam,
                    > > We seem to be thinking about the same thing, and that is very
                    good.I also
                    > > concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The
                    bringadadge
                    > > that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which is
                    due to a
                    > > build-up of emotions over time.
                    > >
                    > > The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair. This
                    is a
                    > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                    felt that
                    > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                    > > process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching the
                    outcome of
                    > > the Mediation and should no appropriate solution bases on
                    justice and truth
                    > > not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged into the
                    Dark
                    > > ages. Woe unto Kenya if this ever happens.
                    > >
                    > > Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em is
                    a noble
                    > > idea of going about solving this problem.It is very true like
                    in n any
                    > > conflict, there is the presenting issue and the emmerging
                    issues. The
                    > > former in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while
                    the bigger
                    > > one is the myriad of injustices kenyans of different ethno-
                    political
                    > > persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of a
                    class
                    > > struggle.Too bad politics innkenya has been ethnicised.
                    > >
                    > > Am a very strong believer in ICT4D.Major world economies today
                    are
                    > > Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has already
                    become a
                    > > ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility they enjoy
                    after the
                    > > genocide? We cannot undescore the role of ICT in creation of
                    new jobs,
                    > > new markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions of
                    otherwise
                    > > idle Kenyan youths who only look at their- well -to -do
                    technosavy
                    > > relatives with jealosy. This is the basis of the vision of my
                    programme
                    > > *Reaching the Unreached.*
                    > > **
                    > > The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical
                    > > mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of land
                    for such
                    > > centres. Perhaps it would be good to try identify existing but
                    moribund
                    > > public structures like Playing fields, cooperative
                    societies ,Market places
                    > > etc, whie involving the local authorities so that the issue
                    of unlimited
                    > > acess and ownership is put into perspective.
                    > >
                    > > How about developing a project strategy that revovles around
                    several
                    > > activities as some practical steps :
                    > >
                    > > - Community mobilisation/awareness creation and marketing
                    > > - Developing Peace Centre specifications
                    > > - Sourcing and installing hardware equipment and software
                    > > - Recruitment of staff
                    > > - Development of local content taking into cognisance the
                    social
                    > > economic enviroment
                    > > - Business incubation ( a kind of informal sector business
                    > > institute )
                    > > - Strategies for sustainability
                    > > - Monitoring and evaluation of the Peace Centres
                    > >
                    > > The peace centres would be more of community resource
                    centres,
                    > > complete with several other activities for entertainment to
                    help in
                    > > bonding the youth towards progressive activities.
                    > >
                    > > Now the challange is how to get our act together while
                    appreciating
                    > > the different strengths each of us have ,develop some worklplan
                    and have
                    > > Those with a passion for this to coalesce around it .
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > *Pamela McLean <pam54321@...>* wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Tom and everyone.
                    > >
                    > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the
                    > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the
                    cause.Somehow we
                    > > have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
                    understand that
                    > > the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives much
                    of the
                    > > robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something
                    similar with the
                    > > killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very
                    terrible.)
                    > >
                    > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new
                    model for
                    > > the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
                    > >
                    > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling
                    that in
                    > > the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of
                    public work in
                    > > the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work on
                    projects of
                    > > value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the
                    economy. Could
                    > > PoP initiate something similar?
                    > >
                    > > There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding.
                    What if
                    > > PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
                    started by
                    > > building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding
                    appropriate
                    > > sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find
                    money to feed
                    > > the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage.
                    Work also uses
                    > > energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and
                    productive work
                    > > gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be
                    first in line
                    > > as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities need
                    to be spread
                    > > as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual
                    gain - local
                    > > peopel will know how it should be done.
                    > >
                    > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the
                    internet
                    > > for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to
                    begin with we
                    > > only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water
                    harvesting,
                    > > already familiar in Kenya). People will not be in the right
                    mood for
                    > > experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.
                    > >
                    > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary
                    shelter or
                    > > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would
                    of course
                    > > have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
                    phones
                    > > initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
                    connectivity.
                    > > The centres could gradually become centres of education and
                    training, as
                    > > well as sports and arts and general community centres - power
                    houses of
                    > > innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational
                    skiil
                    > > building, health education, enterprise development incorporating
                    micro
                    > > finance and other enabling services etc. They could also become
                    experimental
                    > > centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would all
                    be done
                    > > through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports
                    starts with a
                    > > couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so
                    on.
                    > >
                    > > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local
                    labour and
                    > > local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
                    slower results
                    > > and an approach that is initially low tech. However there
                    should be an
                    > > emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not
                    sustainable
                    > > should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace it.
                    Gradually
                    > > the centres should become models of excellence of local - really
                    local -
                    > > developments - locally individual solutions to local needs - but
                    with a
                    > > shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good
                    ides that
                    > > work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone can
                    learn from
                    > > them.
                    > >
                    > > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once
                    the centre
                    > > was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
                    sustainable
                    > > housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
                    > >
                    > > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful
                    approach - not
                    > > some top down model.
                    > >
                    > > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed
                    into
                    > > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
                    > >
                    > > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this
                    afternoons
                    > > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
                    > >
                    > > Pam
                    > >
                    > > 07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@...> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Dear All,
                    > > > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
                    > > > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
                    > > > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
                    > > > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
                    > > > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
                    > > > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
                    > > > with noplacesof employment.
                    > > > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
                    > > > acentre.
                    > > > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
                    > > > with joytang about this.
                    > > > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownpor
                    > > > alliscalm..now day 6.
                    > > > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
                    > > > scholsare on.
                    > > > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
                    > > > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany..it
                    > > > wasanother violence.
                    > > > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
                    > > > 100yrsoldcity.
                    > > > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
                    > > > avictimof looting ..whilegand.invaded my house.
                    > > > Thisismuchidleness..lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
                    > > > people..and they willstopit...they just..got
                    > > > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
                    > > > aare jobless.
                    > > > Thanks
                    > > > TOM.
                    > > > -
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Dan Andrew Otedo
                    > > Administrator
                    > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                    > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                    > > Kenya
                    > > +254720366094
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------------
                    > > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo!
                    Mobile. Try it
                    > >
                    now.<http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51733/*http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=
                    Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >




                    Dan Andrew Otedo
                    Administrator
                    Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                    P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                    Kenya
                    +254720366094


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                  • Dan Otedo
                    Peace be with you all. I have had some interesting reading this evening .This is a true oasis . and we can only keep learning and learning and comming
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 12, 2008
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                      Peace be with you all.
                      I have had  some  interesting reading  this evening .This  is a true oasis . and we can  only keep learning and learning and comming  with new ideas .Perhaps that is part of what humanity  is .
                       
                      Is  there a positive side  to  the Violence  that has rocked Kenya ? I think so! look at this teamwork. PoP, Peace Centres  and  now  P4P . The list could be endless like the fountain  of knowledge. To us Kenyans, it is a moment  of rekoning and reflection  .
                       
                      .I Look at those opportunities  otherwise taken for granted. We have been pushed  to the wall to think positively and explore those horizons we only have  looked at  like the setting sun! Am glad we have a new dawn,  and it  couldnt have come at a good  time , though at a heavy price. This is weired, but forgive me friends.
                       
                      Pam,I have loved every bit of your critique. your 'soapbox' is quite is great! quite enlightening!    did you ask when can we start  the peace Centre  initiative ?  If so,(remind
                      me) then  your guess is as good as mine.We already have !
                       
                      Even then i think development needs some  kind of blueprint ,based on some compact structure- at  least in Africa ( for accountability.We hardly  do a self audit here with the zeal and forthrightness  that  you in the developed  world do(which is a shame on us)
                       
                      Please do tell me what all  you think about what i have been developing  for  a Telecentre  in Rift valley.Chelimo, in  what ways are we concuring  in thought. This  is a management course mannual am developing . It is still in its  infancy,so i invite  your input dear friends .I have not finished it yet ,so your contribution is welcome
                       
                       
                      ABSTRACT:
                      The initiation, diffusion and adoption of the telecentre idea have been an enormously eclectic process, largely devoid of systematic research and planning. The approach has generally been one of pilot projects trying out models to see what works to achieve a diversity of objectives. In some cases the approach has been simply entrepreneurial, with enterprising business people exploring new opportunities for profit-making.

                      A range of important issues is linked to the operation and success of telecentre these include: sustainability, community relevance, government policy, information and communication technology (ICT), research, community partnerships and participation, telecentre objectives, and business planning. Often mentioned but largely undeveloped is the training associated with telecentre management
                                                              
                      While each of the issues deserves systematic analysis,  this manual concentrates on sustainability and training, based on  our experience at ACWICT, and from best practices from various project documents Uganda, South Africa to Australia, Hungary and Canada.
                       
                      This training reflects on these strategies being used to effectively manage and sustain a telecentre, especially in the context of Sabaoti farmers’ Cooperative society Telecentre in Baringo Koibatek, an area where we have incubated an individual connectivity a multi-purpose community telecentre projected to provide a hub of   information-related services involving a wide ray of print and electronic media services.
                       
                      PREFACE:
                      It is extremely important that telecentre staff have some involvement in a program of continuing training and that they be associated with institutions that are doing research and development in areas of telecommunications and systems development. Over time, telecentre managers come to be the lead resource in the community for technical leadership. They need to be as knowledgeable as possible to play this role successfully. (Fuchs 1997)
                      All management staff not just the agency director, should be able to articulate the value of the technology program. Today, programs need a “jack of all trades” program director, which combines strong administrative and management skills, broad-based knowledge of computer hardware and software, teaching skills, and proposal writing skills.  This is the challenge  this manual seeks to overcome by affimating  the management  in order  to come up with the  right kind of staff needed to create a successful program.
                       
                       
                       
                       
                       
                      INTRODUCTION:
                      Telecentres are closely associated with training, particularly information and Communications Technology, (ICT) training.  Many of the early telecentre were essentially ICT training and awareness-raising centers, funded under government training programmes. Most if not all telecentre aim at improving computing and communications skills amongst remote and/or disadvantaged groups.  Some have even offered training on non-ICT topics to local citizens who lack easy access to such training through more traditional methods.
                       
                      However, it is not only the telecentre users who need training. Telecentre staffs, and particularly telecentre managers, need to develop a range of business, administrative and community support skills. This manual explores a training scheme for managers and makes some suggestions for future training initiatives. ACWICT has investing in SFCS telecentre because of our belief that communities benefit from having accurate information, and also that  shared access to information technologies are a key to providing timely and useful information on subjects ranging from market prices to health care, education and security, training on basic hygiene, literacy, water management and environmental protection. Add to these the useful information, especially for rural communities, such as agriculture, animal husbandry, handicrafts, micro-enterprise and self-employment management.
                       
                       
                      The role of Telecentre
                      Telecentres can be instrumental in the development and well-being of a community. Not only can they provide people with access to information related to health, nutrition, education and other social basic necessities, they can support local entrepreneurs with various business services, market information, and e-commerce opportunities; they can help people connect with distant family, friends, and government officials; and they can provide a setting for entertainment and social affairs.
                       
                      This module highlights some simple lessons learned from telecentre experiences world wide:
                      1. Telecentres should concentrate on being demand-driven. This means that they should systematically promote the value of information and keep in close contact with all groups in the community so that they know what the information and communication needs and wants are.
                      2. Telecentres should think of their product as information and communication services, rather than information and communication technology. One of the important services is “adding value” to network information and data bases that will make the information available from them relevant to their users. Another is making use of a variety of communication channels.
                      3. Telecentres should facilitate the use of their services as two-way communication channels for members of the community, making it possible for people to share their ideas with others in addition to gathering information from others.
                      4. Telecentres need to become part of the fabric of the community, in part by building partnerships and fostering participation and cooperation with other agencies. Building a community communication system with other media is an example of this cooperation.
                      5. Training is a vital part of the early life of a telecentre. Volunteers who help run the telecentre, a core of early, enthusiastic and visible supporters in the community, those attracted to the door of the telecentre, and staffs of local agencies
                       
                      PARTICIPATION OF THE COMMUNITY IN YOUR TELECENTER’S OPERATIONS
                      Community participation is very important for various local enterprises.  This ensures perceived   ownership and participation at your telecentre. Participation is important because it:
                      1. Helps you to decide what services to provide
                      2. Affects who uses the telecentre,
                      3. Determines how relevant the telecentre is to the community,
                      4.  Determines whether you get dedicated staff,
                      5. Determines whether the telecentre can survive.
                      1. WHY IS PARTICIPATION IMPORTANT?
                      The goal of participation is to increase the relevance of a project by using the knowledge, values and beliefs of people and groups within the community. The benefits of participation lie in its emphasis on the involvement of multiple and diverse stakeholders who often represent a range of perspectives and ideas, all of which should be given respect and consideration by telecentre staff.
                       
                      The diverse perspectives of individuals within a community serve not only as a reservoir of ideas concerning the community’s ability to address its needs and desires, but also as a reservoir of skills and talents which can be used for taking action to fulfill those needs and desires.
                       
                      Participation can lead to partnerships. Often another organization or group in the community will have resources that will be useful for the telecentre, and the telecentre might help those organizations on its goals.
                      Participation in a telecentre is both a means to — and an indicator of — sustainability. It is a fundamental component of most community-based sustainable projects, and it is also a measurement of the success of the telecentre in meeting community needs.
                       
                       A word of caution: Developing and using participation takes time and requires a high investment of energy, particularly in the beginning stages. While participation may initially seem inefficient and time-consuming in comparison to other methods of management, strong support of a participatory approach, will ultimately result in a telecentre that ultimately is relevant and effective in meeting community needs.
                       
                       
                      ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL PARTICIPATION
                      Involve a variety of stakeholders.
                      The key component to a successful participatory process is the involvement of the stakeholders who will use the telecentre, directly or indirectly. In most cases, this will include representatives of the entire community.
                       
                      Special attention and energy should be given to recruiting typically under-represented or marginalized groups (for example, poor people, youths, women, minorities, and the elderly).
                      A participatory process that only includes community members from the dominant class or favored sectors will not adequately bring attention the multiple interests and needs of the entire community, which the telecentre should try to serve.
                       
                      Some stakeholders may not agree with the inclusion of representatives from all community sectors; however, a successful participatory process involves not only including these under-represented groups, but also making them feel comfortable with the process and incorporating them as equal partners.
                       
                       Evaluating community needs through continuous feedback.
                      Participation is an on-going process. A community is a dynamic body that constantly responds to new social and environmental conditions and often changes in the process. As such, the needs and desires of a community are also continually changing.
                       To operate telecenters in the most effective way, telecentre managers must continually assess the needs of the community to ensure that the telecentre is up-to-date in meeting those needs. One of the best ways to ensure that the emerging needs are met is to ask the community.
                      This is can be done, as we will discuss later, by making participation a part of the management policy of a
                      Telecentre.
                       
                      Participation should not only be promoted, it should also be measured. By conducting regular needs analysis, telecentre personnel will be able to measure progress and identify areas of concern. A needs analysis in a community serves the double purpose of collecting outside assessments, as well as spurring participation.
                      Through sharing their opinions in the analysis, individuals will, indirectly, be participating in the development of the telecentre. For more suggestions on how to conduct a community needs analysis
                        
                      Create significant integration of the telecentre into community’s institutions.
                      One of the best ways to enhance the potential for telecentre sustainability is to combine efforts with already existing organizations in the community. This has several advantages.
                      ·         First, it integrates the telecentre into a pre-established social and organizational network, thus increasing the chances that the telecentre will become established as an important part of the community.
                      ·         Second, it works to ensure that the activities of the telecentre will complement and not compete with – existing community projects.
                      ·          Third, the telecentre can provide services to the established organizations to aid them in their work and enhance their efforts.
                      Integration with these community institutions requires that the telecentre invite them to participate in the life of the telecentre. It is not by good luck that this happens, but rather by good design. We will address this issue later.
                      Raising awareness about the telecentre to the community.
                      Simply establishing a telecentre is not enough; supporters must actively "market" the idea that information is valuable and that the telecentre is the key to the benefits of good information and communication. Although , it is seemingly obvious that the  community members must first become aware of the telecentre and its services before they will get involved in it. Telecentre managers must persuade their communities of the benefits to be gained through information technologies
                      Focusing on the information, not the hardware, is the key to reaching much of the community that has a natural resistance to technology
                      Diffusion of information is the goal, technology is merely the medium.
                       
                      Advertisements in the local paper, on the local radio and/or television station, pamphlets, fundraising activities – these are all examples of basic marketing ideas that are discussed in more detail elsewhere in this manual.  It is good to remember that a satisfied customer is the best advertisement there is.
                       
                      GETTING STARTED WITH A STRATEGIC APPROACH
                      A starting point is for the telecentre leadership group to address some basic questions about participation in the telecentre program.
                      1. Why is participation important to this project? Among the answers might be: because it conveys a sense of community ownership; it provides indigenous wisdom; it helps reflect community values and will help us identify information needs; it provides important resources, such as volunteers or technical expertise, at a favorable cost; and some people need the telecenters services.
                       Your telecentre team, which might be joined by representatives from various organizations in the community to explore this and other questions, can add to this list.
                       
                      2. Who should participate? The answers may flow out of the first question, but they should be made explicit; it is not enough to say “the community.” What groups of people should receive specific attention because of the possibility they will be marginalized — like women, poor people, minorities, the elderly? We’ll note later how the nature of information technologies themselves can exclude people from participation and the potential benefits of telecenters.
                       
                       
                      3. How might people participate? The easy answer is to say that all can participate through use
                      of the ICT facilities. But there are other potential facets of community participation in a telecentre: Volunteers who oversee daily operations, tutors who give lessons, advisory groups for different aspects of the operations, people who provide links to other community organizations, and people who manage particular data bases and add value to information resources.
                       
                      4. How much participation should be sought? Is maximum participation the goal, or should there be a target called optimal participation? Some would advocate a kind of participation where the community is fully responsible for the telecentre, from policies and management to raising money and caretaking. Local culture and people resources may dictate a more limited role for the general community. It is not hard to imagine situations where there can too much participation. Agreement needs to be reached on the how much issue.
                       
                      5. When should participation take place? This depends on what kind of participation (the how) is being considered. It probably should begin no later than the time in the planning when participation itself is being considered.
                       By putting participation into the planning and being specific about the timing avoids the “we know it’s important but haven’t got to that yet” defense.
                       
                      6. What incentives can be offered? Benefits from the information services may satisfy many. Money and public recognition are important, but so too are special privileges regarding use of telecentre facilities or, for telecentre volunteers, discounts from shops in the community (which is a way that merchants can participate).
                      Other answers for some of these questions will depend on your own community’s circumstances, and only you and your telecentre team can provide those answers. But it is important that the answers be addressed
                      and incorporated in a clearly agreed upon plan of action for the telecentre.
                       
                      OBSTACLES TO PARTICIPATION
                      Telecenters are an innovation and thus a stranger to the community. And a new telecenter in the community will mean a change in the way some parts of the community work. Some members of the community will welcome the telecenter with curiosity and fascination.
                      Others will see it as a threat and an intrusion in a system that already has its time-tested traditional ways.
                       
                      Participation in activities at the telecentre are either at individual or collective levels:
                      Individual participation.
                      We need to think about the uses of the telecenter by a specific community and involvement of community members in telecenter activities. We can call this individual participation some of  the obstacles to this kind of participation include :
                       
                       
                      1. Economic obstacles. Can the community pay for the services? Acknowledging that you must have a business plan for the telecenter’s sustainability, you will need to consider what services people can people afford, and who might be excluded if there are charges for various services. Research and planning will reveal what services are feasible and affordable
                       We can also ask another question: even if community members are able to afford the services, is the community willing to pay?. The approach we take may determine whether those who use the
                      telecenter are participants or just clientele.
                       

                      Pamela McLean <pam54321@...> wrote:
                      Hi Don Ricardo and everyone.

                      I appreciate your discussions and ideas.

                      I agree that lack of infrasturcture is a major problem - but there are ways around that until it comes. We don't have to wait until the infrastructure is there before we start doing ICT related things and Peace centre things. There are various work-arounds that can be used to enable communication to happen and information to be used. I think if we start to work then the technology will follow us. I agree wtih Don that it is important to keep things on a small enough scale so that there is no jealously about one place getting more that another.

                      Regarding how we get the technology I think of the ICT4D checklist -  Information, Communication, Technology for Development.

                      I think of what we are already doing.
                      • Information - We already have information needs and we are addressing them.
                      • Communication - We have a fantastic network of people who are communicating
                      • Technology - We don't wait until we have a top-down centre provided - we get on and try to squeeze every last drop of potential out of what we have. If we don't have a local Internet connection then we  make do with flash drives or phones to extend beyond the reach of the cyber cafes. We work on local work-arounds, (friendly cyber cafe managers, and motorpark drivers in Nigeria) Sneakernets and Includers soon, laptops and flash drives now. 
                      • Development - we are doing it.
                      ICT4D projects only work if they can tick all four boxes - I and C and T and D. Lots of them focus too much on the Technology and do not bring in all the rest properly. An ICT4D project which is only resting  on the Technology is like a person perching on a stool which only has one leg instead of three. It is going to fall over.

                      Our projects do tick all the boxes. As long as we build carefully they will succeed. If the technology providers have any sense or imagination they will start to queue up to work with us - because we are the people who can demonstrate what the technology can really do. 

                      I will "get on my soap box" - In my opinion too many projects that are top-down technology-driven projects are "empty". The computers are there, the VSATs are there, sometimes even the people are there. (Some people may only be there for "the three Gs" Girls, Games, and Gambling. Others may be more serious learning to be computer operators, or doing word processing or spreadsheets exercises. A few may be usign it seriously). But how much real information is there? Where is the information like we have buzzing around in Mincius Sodas, supporting the Pyramid of Peace, finding ways to enable the young people planning  future opportunities and  training - doing things that are needs-driven?

                      Some computers look fine but they are empty of real information. They are empty, and therefore of no use, like a plate may be empty, with no food on it. An empty plate is fine if you are not hungry for food. An empty computer is fine if you are not hungry for information. But really - if the plate or computer is empty -  what is the point in having it?

                      Let our PoP youth demonstrate true hunger for information and training without waiting for a top-down centre. Then I believe the technology to deliver teh information and training better will follow. The people who make the technology start off with the equivalent of "empty plates". They benefit from working with people like us, because we can show how the technology can perform when it is "full of good things". We need to use the ICT we have got (SMS, phots, emails, chatroom, wiki) to show how information hungry and hardworking the  youths can be.

                      Let them learn the practicalities of old fashioned pen and paper bookkeeping and business plans first, then, when they do get a computer to do it they will better understand what the figures are all about, and how the computer helps. Meanwhile they can surely get a simple calculator. People have been keeping detailed records since long before electronic calculators and computers were around. It is much more important to get started on the thinking and planning skills than it is to getn started on the computeriisation of the figures..

                      RIcardo, you mentioned CAWD and my Teachers Talking work. I think I should clarify that CAWD and Teachers Talking are separate.

                      CAWD is small registered UK charity. I am a trustee. We could certainly use CAWD to process funds for Peace Centres. It has the right structures in place. That is why when David got his funding from COL (Commonwealth of Learning) for his first project he did it under the umbrella of CAWD. It was a COL/CAWD/CLICC project which comes to an end of its funding in a couple of month time.

                      I got involved with CAWD before it was a registered charity. It was set up  by the late Peter Adetunji Oyawale, whose widow, Agnita is a close friend of mine. My practical grass-roots involvement with CAWD was largely in Peter's home area in Oyo State. I am no longer involved in that although I still have ties of friendship.

                      CAWD does not currently have a fundraiser, so it is not getting new money in at present, so people should not approach it for support.

                      Teachers Talking is my own personal project as an ICT4Ed&D practitioner. I started to develop it in 2004 at the request of my friend John Dada, to present at Fantsuam Foundation. I ran the TT course in Kenya for David pro-bono because of the work we had done together in Nigeria. It was a personal gift in kind, because David was trying to set up something new which I wanted to support.

                      Hope that clears the confusion.

                      If any of the training that I have developed through the TT programme is of benefit to the Peace Centres I will do my best to share it there as well.

                      Pam

                      On 09/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@yahoo. com> wrote:
                      Dear Pam and Ricardo,
                      Your ideas have been  quite edifying .Real Orchards of  Thoughts and Ideas  interwoven is a subtle way.And to say that  i also keep learning  is very true .
                       
                      Pam  you observed right in a way that  the telecentre way is a top down rather  than a bottom  up sstrategy.  I have been looking at the  Telecentre cookbook cookbook@un. org.za and several other resourcs like  http//www.telecentr es.org  and those  that reflect  on the African telecentre Experience.
                       
                      I have reservations  of giving people  some tecnology which  they might find irrelevant ,innapropriate or overtaken by times. Pam  you have the experience  of Nigeria  and even Kenya , where   you have engaged  in empoweri ng  teachers  in ICT skills.I have  done the same here. One  of the challanges has always been the  infrastructure and i think pooling resources comes second to none in Africa . The spotlight here  is  on peace and sustainable  utilisation  of ICT infarstructure to promote it. what a better way of spreading risks by ensuring community ownership  through  Peace Centres/Telecentres , Community information Communication technology centres .. whichever name  we have for them!
                       
                       One  thing which  did  not escape my  notice  is that  the Farmers cooperative Society  which  i will visit  on  tuesday  in the clash torn Eldama Ravine ,jealously kept out of harms way  ,the equipmennt they were  given by  our partner  organisation . This gave me the feelng that they valued  them very  much, but hardly appreciated   the oppprotunities  that come   with ICT.
                       
                       At  the moment am developing an appreciation mannual for the  for  the training  the management  of the  faclity and possibly reviewing  thier business plans  and  mobilise volunteers to   with day  to day running  of the same ,by incubating   some  ICT realed business tasks  for themselves. I also plan to take  the management  of the society  for a workshop at Egerton  University's  Dairy and Food Technology Deparment  to have them be abreast with  Scientific  management  of  enterprises.
                       
                       
                      Richard  your idea  especially one page websites ,makinng  an income from computer related tasks , the   Minimalist Telecentres  is worth trying  out .
                      I would prefer raising mones  and having  contributions directly  to CAWD  for such centres. We are yet to register a Trust or Charity.The Work at  hand  is a lot which  is very good .   
                       
                      Perhaps am  torn between implemnting pre-planned projects  like these  funded by Microsoft upon invitation, and small beautiful  ones  that ooze from Orchards  of thought.I tell you this team here is very resilient ,creative and dymanic, something  lacking in NGO's  which  have a set   mind .
                       
                      I will be  in touch with Mr Mark Matunga  of  microsoft  to engag  him  on what role  they can play  in. He  is  out of the country at the moment, but am staying  at  his house in Nairobi  at  the  moment. 
                      ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@ yahoo.co. uk> wrote:
                      Hi Pam and Dan

                      I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
                      promote peace and provide work for local youths.

                      Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
                      centre being the most important things. That implies some money
                      needs to be raised to start the centres.

                      That can be broken down into :-

                      1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).

                      2. Inside/local funding.

                      I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get onto
                      the more desirable/sustainab le local funding.

                      Possible outside funding sources:

                      1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
                      website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
                      donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
                      chequess, etc.

                      2. Donations via Dan's charity/non- profit, registered in Kenya.

                      Either of these could be promoted in the press by
                      articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself Pam,
                      by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
                      potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
                      biography. That would lead into an article about the existing peace
                      work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
                      dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the peace
                      work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
                      action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
                      several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could finish
                      with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
                      written 'landing-page', summarising the work and the peace centre
                      concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
                      be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other charities,
                      Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.

                      Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote Dan's
                      organization.

                      Other outside funding:

                      Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
                      Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
                      Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at last
                      and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
                      Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
                      fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in 2009.
                      Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
                      broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger Economy'
                      like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').

                      http://allafrica. com/stories/ 200802051178. html

                      Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
                      through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
                      Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office programs,
                      etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.

                      Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
                      sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
                      centres.

                      Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
                      winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
                      small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
                      VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
                      cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
                      company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
                      Centres/TeleCentres .

                      Local funding:

                      Offline local fund-raising events -

                      a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local people
                      to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
                      wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
                      opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace Centre.

                      b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
                      the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
                      Nairobi.

                      c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of the
                      profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral marketing',
                      so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.

                      d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
                      some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum of
                      seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as an
                      all-in-one printer/scanner/ photocopier for £40 or $80, making money
                      just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
                      provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
                      photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
                      earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
                      computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/ Infrared link, and
                      connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
                      service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
                      provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses for
                      the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
                      computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.

                      The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
                      before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.

                      Income activities:

                      One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
                      one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar businesses,
                      such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
                      plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
                      notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service details
                      from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
                      business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
                      people and people further away can at least find that business and
                      place orders by phone or know where they

                      (Message over 64 KB, truncated)
                    • Peter Burgess
                      Dear Colleagues The violence in Kenya is a mess, and I hope Kenya will be able to emerge from the violence soon and with the least of personal and physical
                      Message 10 of 12 , Feb 12, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Dear Colleagues

                        The violence in Kenya is a mess, and I hope Kenya will be able to
                        emerge from the violence soon and with the least of personal and
                        physical damage.

                        Maybe there can be some learning from this. I was at a Dr. Muhammad
                        Yunus event last evening here in New York. When Dr. Yunus talks, it is
                        always about the potential of people. He never concludes that people
                        are in poverty because they cannot ... rather he concludes that people
                        are poor because of the system that we have created. When we change
                        the system, people will have opportunity and people will not be poor.
                        He often concludes by talking about the need to build "poverty
                        museums" where children can be taken to learn what poverty was!

                        In terms of changing the system ... my goal has been for some time now
                        to help facilitate people centric community centric development. I am
                        an accountant by professional training, and subscribe to the idea that
                        what gets measured gets done. Accordingly I am trying to get a system
                        of socio-economic development progress metrics that work at the
                        community level ... which in turn can inform international assistance
                        decision making and development funding. The concepts are very much
                        along the lines of those advocated by Dr. Yunus ... people are the
                        most important asset and opportunity ... what is needed to make
                        opportunity happen ... microcredit? ... health? ... education? ...
                        safe water? ... safe habitat? ... jobs? ... minicredit? ...
                        municredit? ... law and order? ... etc... etc.

                        My short term goal is to have data flow from communities about
                        communities so that there can be a community centric pool of data that
                        can be used for analysis ... and decision making. Relational database
                        so that it is organized and useful. The Tr-Ac-Net database is
                        relational ... is quite comprhensive ... but is not 100% of what it
                        can be and should be. Mea culpa ... I left college before computers
                        were invented ... but I have learned something over the years about
                        the management and manipulation of data so that it can be used
                        usefully.

                        I see the community telecenter ... peacecenter ... community center
                        ... whatever, also as the focal point of community data flow. My hope
                        is we can do this (1) for general community information and (2) for
                        specific malaria management information

                        My hope is that Ricardo's help in the development of the Includer can
                        help make data flow efficient and really cost effective.

                        I have a growing community of interest around these matters ... and
                        feedback about community centric data from Kenya would be of
                        considerable value in getting the database initiative moved forward.

                        With best wishes ... and seriously wishing for peace and safety

                        Peter Burgess
                        ____________
                        Peter Burgess
                        The Transparency and Accountability Network: Tr-Ac-Net in New York
                        www.tr-ac-net.org
                        IMMC - The Integrated Malaria Management Consortium Inc.
                        www.IMMConsortium.org
                        The Tr-Ac-Net blogs ... start at http://tracnetagenda.blogspot.com
                        917 432 1191 or 212 772 6918 peterbnyc@...
                        /////////////////////////////////////////
                        On Feb 12, 2008 9:19 AM, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Peace be with you all.
                        > I have had some interesting reading this evening .This is a true oasis .
                        > and we can only keep learning and learning and comming with new ideas
                        > .Perhaps that is part of what humanity is .
                        >
                        > Is there a positive side to the Violence that has rocked Kenya ? I think
                        > so! look at this teamwork. PoP, Peace Centres and now P4P . The list
                        > could be endless like the fountain of knowledge. To us Kenyans, it is a
                        > moment of rekoning and reflection .
                        >
                        > .I Look at those opportunities otherwise taken for granted. We have been
                        > pushed to the wall to think positively and explore those horizons we only
                        > have looked at like the setting sun! Am glad we have a new dawn, and it
                        > couldnt have come at a good time , though at a heavy price. This is weired,
                        > but forgive me friends.
                        >
                        > Pam,I have loved every bit of your critique. your 'soapbox' is quite is
                        > great! quite enlightening! did you ask when can we start the peace
                        > Centre initiative ? If so,(remind
                        > me) then your guess is as good as mine.We already have !
                        >
                        > Even then i think development needs some kind of blueprint ,based on some
                        > compact structure- at least in Africa ( for accountability.We hardly do a
                        > self audit here with the zeal and forthrightness that you in the developed
                        > world do(which is a shame on us)
                        >
                        > Please do tell me what all you think about what i have been developing for
                        > a Telecentre in Rift valley.Chelimo, in what ways are we concuring in
                        > thought. This is a management course mannual am developing . It is still in
                        > its infancy,so i invite your input dear friends .I have not finished it
                        > yet ,so your contribution is welcome
                        >
                        >
                        > ABSTRACT:
                        > The initiation, diffusion and adoption of the telecentre idea have been an
                        > enormously eclectic process, largely devoid of systematic research and
                        > planning. The approach has generally been one of pilot projects trying out
                        > models to see what works to achieve a diversity of objectives. In some cases
                        > the approach has been simply entrepreneurial, with enterprising business
                        > people exploring new opportunities for profit-making.
                        >
                        > A range of important issues is linked to the operation and success of
                        > telecentre these include: sustainability, community relevance, government
                        > policy, information and communication technology (ICT), research, community
                        > partnerships and participation, telecentre objectives, and business
                        > planning. Often mentioned but largely undeveloped is the training associated
                        > with telecentre management
                        >
                        > While each of the issues deserves systematic analysis, this manual
                        > concentrates on sustainability and training, based on our experience at
                        > ACWICT, and from best practices from various project documents Uganda, South
                        > Africa to Australia, Hungary and Canada.
                        >
                        > This training reflects on these strategies being used to effectively manage
                        > and sustain a telecentre, especially in the context of Sabaoti farmers'
                        > Cooperative society Telecentre in Baringo Koibatek, an area where we have
                        > incubated an individual connectivity a multi-purpose community telecentre
                        > projected to provide a hub of information-related services involving a
                        > wide ray of print and electronic media services.
                        >
                        > PREFACE:
                        > It is extremely important that telecentre staff have some involvement in a
                        > program of continuing training and that they be associated with institutions
                        > that are doing research and development in areas of telecommunications and
                        > systems development. Over time, telecentre managers come to be the lead
                        > resource in the community for technical leadership. They need to be as
                        > knowledgeable as possible to play this role successfully. (Fuchs 1997)
                        > All management staff not just the agency director, should be able to
                        > articulate the value of the technology program. Today, programs need a "jack
                        > of all trades" program director, which combines strong administrative and
                        > management skills, broad-based knowledge of computer hardware and software,
                        > teaching skills, and proposal writing skills. This is the challenge this
                        > manual seeks to overcome by affimating the management in order to come up
                        > with the right kind of staff needed to create a successful program.
                        >
                        > INTRODUCTION:
                        > Telecentres are closely associated with training, particularly information
                        > and Communications Technology, (ICT) training. Many of the early telecentre
                        > were essentially ICT training and awareness-raising centers, funded under
                        > government training programmes. Most if not all telecentre aim at improving
                        > computing and communications skills amongst remote and/or disadvantaged
                        > groups. Some have even offered training on non-ICT topics to local citizens
                        > who lack easy access to such training through more traditional methods.
                        >
                        > However, it is not only the telecentre users who need training. Telecentre
                        > staffs, and particularly telecentre managers, need to develop a range of
                        > business, administrative and community support skills. This manual explores
                        > a training scheme for managers and makes some suggestions for future
                        > training initiatives. ACWICT has investing in SFCS telecentre because of our
                        > belief that communities benefit from having accurate information, and also
                        > that shared access to information technologies are a key to providing
                        > timely and useful information on subjects ranging from market prices to
                        > health care, education and security, training on basic hygiene, literacy,
                        > water management and environmental protection. Add to these the useful
                        > information, especially for rural communities, such as agriculture, animal
                        > husbandry, handicrafts, micro-enterprise and self-employment management.
                        >
                        > The role of Telecentre
                        > Telecentres can be instrumental in the development and well-being of a
                        > community. Not only can they provide people with access to information
                        > related to health, nutrition, education and other social basic necessities,
                        > they can support local entrepreneurs with various business services, market
                        > information, and e-commerce opportunities; they can help people connect with
                        > distant family, friends, and government officials; and they can provide a
                        > setting for entertainment and social affairs.
                        >
                        > This module highlights some simple lessons learned from telecentre
                        > experiences world wide:
                        > 1. Telecentres should concentrate on being demand-driven. This means that
                        > they should systematically promote the value of information and keep in
                        > close contact with all groups in the community so that they know what the
                        > information and communication needs and wants are.
                        > 2. Telecentres should think of their product as information and
                        > communication services, rather than information and communication
                        > technology. One of the important services is "adding value" to network
                        > information and data bases that will make the information available from
                        > them relevant to their users. Another is making use of a variety of
                        > communication channels.
                        > 3. Telecentres should facilitate the use of their services as two-way
                        > communication channels for members of the community, making it possible for
                        > people to share their ideas with others in addition to gathering information
                        > from others.
                        > 4. Telecentres need to become part of the fabric of the community, in part
                        > by building partnerships and fostering participation and cooperation with
                        > other agencies. Building a community communication system with other media
                        > is an example of this cooperation.
                        > 5. Training is a vital part of the early life of a telecentre. Volunteers
                        > who help run the telecentre, a core of early, enthusiastic and visible
                        > supporters in the community, those attracted to the door of the telecentre,
                        > and staffs of local agencies
                        >
                        > PARTICIPATION OF THE COMMUNITY IN YOUR TELECENTER'S OPERATIONS
                        > Community participation is very important for various local enterprises.
                        > This ensures perceived ownership and participation at your telecentre.
                        > Participation is important because it:
                        > Helps you to decide what services to provide
                        > Affects who uses the telecentre,
                        > Determines how relevant the telecentre is to the community,
                        > Determines whether you get dedicated staff,
                        > Determines whether the telecentre can survive.
                        > 1. WHY IS PARTICIPATION IMPORTANT?
                        > The goal of participation is to increase the relevance of a project by using
                        > the knowledge, values and beliefs of people and groups within the community.
                        > The benefits of participation lie in its emphasis on the involvement of
                        > multiple and diverse stakeholders who often represent a range of
                        > perspectives and ideas, all of which should be given respect and
                        > consideration by telecentre staff.
                        >
                        > The diverse perspectives of individuals within a community serve not only as
                        > a reservoir of ideas concerning the community's ability to address its needs
                        > and desires, but also as a reservoir of skills and talents which can be used
                        > for taking action to fulfill those needs and desires.
                        >
                        > Participation can lead to partnerships. Often another organization or group
                        > in the community will have resources that will be useful for the telecentre,
                        > and the telecentre might help those organizations on its goals.
                        > Participation in a telecentre is both a means to — and an indicator of —
                        > sustainability. It is a fundamental component of most community-based
                        > sustainable projects, and it is also a measurement of the success of the
                        > telecentre in meeting community needs.
                        >
                        > A word of caution: Developing and using participation takes time and
                        > requires a high investment of energy, particularly in the beginning stages.
                        > While participation may initially seem inefficient and time-consuming in
                        > comparison to other methods of management, strong support of a participatory
                        > approach, will ultimately result in a telecentre that ultimately is relevant
                        > and effective in meeting community needs.
                        >
                        > ELEMENTS OF SUCCESSFUL PARTICIPATION
                        > Involve a variety of stakeholders.
                        > The key component to a successful participatory process is the involvement
                        > of the stakeholders who will use the telecentre, directly or indirectly. In
                        > most cases, this will include representatives of the entire community.
                        >
                        > Special attention and energy should be given to recruiting typically
                        > under-represented or marginalized groups (for example, poor people, youths,
                        > women, minorities, and the elderly).
                        > A participatory process that only includes community members from the
                        > dominant class or favored sectors will not adequately bring attention the
                        > multiple interests and needs of the entire community, which the telecentre
                        > should try to serve.
                        >
                        > Some stakeholders may not agree with the inclusion of representatives from
                        > all community sectors; however, a successful participatory process involves
                        > not only including these under-represented groups, but also making them feel
                        > comfortable with the process and incorporating them as equal partners.
                        >
                        > Evaluating community needs through continuous feedback.
                        > Participation is an on-going process. A community is a dynamic body that
                        > constantly responds to new social and environmental conditions and often
                        > changes in the process. As such, the needs and desires of a community are
                        > also continually changing.
                        > To operate telecenters in the most effective way, telecentre managers must
                        > continually assess the needs of the community to ensure that the telecentre
                        > is up-to-date in meeting those needs. One of the best ways to ensure that
                        > the emerging needs are met is to ask the community.
                        > This is can be done, as we will discuss later, by making participation a
                        > part of the management policy of a
                        > Telecentre.
                        >
                        > Participation should not only be promoted, it should also be measured. By
                        > conducting regular needs analysis, telecentre personnel will be able to
                        > measure progress and identify areas of concern. A needs analysis in a
                        > community serves the double purpose of collecting outside assessments, as
                        > well as spurring participation.
                        > Through sharing their opinions in the analysis, individuals will,
                        > indirectly, be participating in the development of the telecentre. For more
                        > suggestions on how to conduct a community needs analysis
                        >
                        > Create significant integration of the telecentre into community's
                        > institutions.
                        > One of the best ways to enhance the potential for telecentre sustainability
                        > is to combine efforts with already existing organizations in the community.
                        > This has several advantages.
                        > · First, it integrates the telecentre into a pre-established social
                        > and organizational network, thus increasing the chances that the telecentre
                        > will become established as an important part of the community.
                        > · Second, it works to ensure that the activities of the telecentre
                        > will complement and not compete with – existing community projects.
                        > · Third, the telecentre can provide services to the established
                        > organizations to aid them in their work and enhance their efforts.
                        > Integration with these community institutions requires that the telecentre
                        > invite them to participate in the life of the telecentre. It is not by good
                        > luck that this happens, but rather by good design. We will address this
                        > issue later.
                        > Raising awareness about the telecentre to the community.
                        > Simply establishing a telecentre is not enough; supporters must actively
                        > "market" the idea that information is valuable and that the telecentre is
                        > the key to the benefits of good information and communication. Although , it
                        > is seemingly obvious that the community members must first become aware of
                        > the telecentre and its services before they will get involved in it.
                        > Telecentre managers must persuade their communities of the benefits to be
                        > gained through information technologies
                        > Focusing on the information, not the hardware, is the key to reaching much
                        > of the community that has a natural resistance to technology
                        > Diffusion of information is the goal, technology is merely the medium.
                        >
                        > Advertisements in the local paper, on the local radio and/or television
                        > station, pamphlets, fundraising activities – these are all examples of basic
                        > marketing ideas that are discussed in more detail elsewhere in this manual.
                        > It is good to remember that a satisfied customer is the best advertisement
                        > there is.
                        >
                        > GETTING STARTED WITH A STRATEGIC APPROACH
                        > A starting point is for the telecentre leadership group to address some
                        > basic questions about participation in the telecentre program.
                        > 1. Why is participation important to this project? Among the answers might
                        > be: because it conveys a sense of community ownership; it provides
                        > indigenous wisdom; it helps reflect community values and will help us
                        > identify information needs; it provides important resources, such as
                        > volunteers or technical expertise, at a favorable cost; and some people need
                        > the telecenters services.
                        > Your telecentre team, which might be joined by representatives from various
                        > organizations in the community to explore this and other questions, can add
                        > to this list.
                        >
                        > 2. Who should participate? The answers may flow out of the first question,
                        > but they should be made explicit; it is not enough to say "the community."
                        > What groups of people should receive specific attention because of the
                        > possibility they will be marginalized — like women, poor people, minorities,
                        > the elderly? We'll note later how the nature of information technologies
                        > themselves can exclude people from participation and the potential benefits
                        > of telecenters.
                        >
                        > 3. How might people participate? The easy answer is to say that all can
                        > participate through use
                        > of the ICT facilities. But there are other potential facets of community
                        > participation in a telecentre: Volunteers who oversee daily operations,
                        > tutors who give lessons, advisory groups for different aspects of the
                        > operations, people who provide links to other community organizations, and
                        > people who manage particular data bases and add value to information
                        > resources.
                        >
                        > 4. How much participation should be sought? Is maximum participation the
                        > goal, or should there be a target called optimal participation? Some would
                        > advocate a kind of participation where the community is fully responsible
                        > for the telecentre, from policies and management to raising money and
                        > caretaking. Local culture and people resources may dictate a more limited
                        > role for the general community. It is not hard to imagine situations where
                        > there can too much participation. Agreement needs to be reached on the how
                        > much issue.
                        >
                        > 5. When should participation take place? This depends on what kind of
                        > participation (the how) is being considered. It probably should begin no
                        > later than the time in the planning when participation itself is being
                        > considered.
                        > By putting participation into the planning and being specific about the
                        > timing avoids the "we know it's important but haven't got to that yet"
                        > defense.
                        >
                        > 6. What incentives can be offered? Benefits from the information services
                        > may satisfy many. Money and public recognition are important, but so too are
                        > special privileges regarding use of telecentre facilities or, for telecentre
                        > volunteers, discounts from shops in the community (which is a way that
                        > merchants can participate).
                        > Other answers for some of these questions will depend on your own
                        > community's circumstances, and only you and your telecentre team can provide
                        > those answers. But it is important that the answers be addressed
                        > and incorporated in a clearly agreed upon plan of action for the telecentre.
                        >
                        > OBSTACLES TO PARTICIPATION
                        > Telecenters are an innovation and thus a stranger to the community. And a
                        > new telecenter in the community will mean a change in the way some parts of
                        > the community work. Some members of the community will welcome the
                        > telecenter with curiosity and fascination.
                        > Others will see it as a threat and an intrusion in a system that already has
                        > its time-tested traditional ways.
                        >
                        > Participation in activities at the telecentre are either at individual or
                        > collective levels:
                        > Individual participation.
                        > We need to think about the uses of the telecenter by a specific community
                        > and involvement of community members in telecenter activities. We can call
                        > this individual participation some of the obstacles to this kind of
                        > participation include :
                        >
                        > Economic obstacles. Can the community pay for the services? Acknowledging
                        > that you must have a business plan for the telecenter's sustainability, you
                        > will need to consider what services people can people afford, and who might
                        > be excluded if there are charges for various services. Research and planning
                        > will reveal what services are feasible and affordable
                        > We can also ask another question: even if community members are able to
                        > afford the services, is the community willing to pay?. The approach we take
                        > may determine whether those who use the
                        > telecenter are participants or just clientele.
                        >
                        > Pamela McLean <pam54321@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Don Ricardo and everyone.
                        >
                        > I appreciate your discussions and ideas.
                        >
                        > I agree that lack of infrasturcture is a major problem - but there are ways
                        > around that until it comes. We don't have to wait until the infrastructure
                        > is there before we start doing ICT related things and Peace centre things.
                        > There are various work-arounds that can be used to enable communication to
                        > happen and information to be used. I think if we start to work then the
                        > technology will follow us. I agree wtih Don that it is important to keep
                        > things on a small enough scale so that there is no jealously about one place
                        > getting more that another.
                        >
                        > Regarding how we get the technology I think of the ICT4D checklist -
                        > Information, Communication, Technology for Development.
                        >
                        > I think of what we are already doing.
                        >
                        > Information - We already have information needs and we are addressing them.
                        > Communication - We have a fantastic network of people who are communicating
                        > Technology - We don't wait until we have a top-down centre provided - we get
                        > on and try to squeeze every last drop of potential out of what we have. If
                        > we don't have a local Internet connection then we make do with flash drives
                        > or phones to extend beyond the reach of the cyber cafes. We work on local
                        > work-arounds, (friendly cyber cafe managers, and motorpark drivers in
                        > Nigeria) Sneakernets and Includers soon, laptops and flash drives now.
                        > Development - we are doing it.ICT4D projects only work if they can tick all
                        > four boxes - I and C and T and D. Lots of them focus too much on the
                        > Technology and do not bring in all the rest properly. An ICT4D project which
                        > is only resting on the Technology is like a person perching on a stool
                        > which only has one leg instead of three. It is going to fall over.
                        >
                        > Our projects do tick all the boxes. As long as we build carefully they will
                        > succeed. If the technology providers have any sense or imagination they will
                        > start to queue up to work with us - because we are the people who can
                        > demonstrate what the technology can really do.
                        >
                        > I will "get on my soap box" - In my opinion too many projects that are
                        > top-down technology-driven projects are "empty". The computers are there,
                        > the VSATs are there, sometimes even the people are there. (Some people may
                        > only be there for "the three Gs" Girls, Games, and Gambling. Others may be
                        > more serious learning to be computer operators, or doing word processing or
                        > spreadsheets exercises. A few may be usign it seriously). But how much real
                        > information is there? Where is the information like we have buzzing around
                        > in Mincius Sodas, supporting the Pyramid of Peace, finding ways to enable
                        > the young people planning future opportunities and training - doing things
                        > that are needs-driven?
                        >
                        > Some computers look fine but they are empty of real information. They are
                        > empty, and therefore of no use, like a plate may be empty, with no food on
                        > it. An empty plate is fine if you are not hungry for food. An empty computer
                        > is fine if you are not hungry for information. But really - if the plate or
                        > computer is empty - what is the point in having it?
                        >
                        > Let our PoP youth demonstrate true hunger for information and training
                        > without waiting for a top-down centre. Then I believe the technology to
                        > deliver teh information and training better will follow. The people who make
                        > the technology start off with the equivalent of "empty plates". They benefit
                        > from working with people like us, because we can show how the technology can
                        > perform when it is "full of good things". We need to use the ICT we have got
                        > (SMS, phots, emails, chatroom, wiki) to show how information hungry and
                        > hardworking the youths can be.
                        >
                        > Let them learn the practicalities of old fashioned pen and paper bookkeeping
                        > and business plans first, then, when they do get a computer to do it they
                        > will better understand what the figures are all about, and how the computer
                        > helps. Meanwhile they can surely get a simple calculator. People have been
                        > keeping detailed records since long before electronic calculators and
                        > computers were around. It is much more important to get started on the
                        > thinking and planning skills than it is to getn started on the
                        > computeriisation of the figures..
                        >
                        > RIcardo, you mentioned CAWD and my Teachers Talking work. I think I should
                        > clarify that CAWD and Teachers Talking are separate.
                        >
                        > CAWD is small registered UK charity. I am a trustee. We could certainly use
                        > CAWD to process funds for Peace Centres. It has the right structures in
                        > place. That is why when David got his funding from COL (Commonwealth of
                        > Learning) for his first project he did it under the umbrella of CAWD. It was
                        > a COL/CAWD/CLICC project which comes to an end of its funding in a couple of
                        > month time.
                        >
                        > I got involved with CAWD before it was a registered charity. It was set up
                        > by the late Peter Adetunji Oyawale, whose widow, Agnita is a close friend of
                        > mine. My practical grass-roots involvement with CAWD was largely in Peter's
                        > home area in Oyo State. I am no longer involved in that although I still
                        > have ties of friendship.
                        >
                        > CAWD does not currently have a fundraiser, so it is not getting new money in
                        > at present, so people should not approach it for support.
                        >
                        > Teachers Talking is my own personal project as an ICT4Ed&D practitioner. I
                        > started to develop it in 2004 at the request of my friend John Dada, to
                        > present at Fantsuam Foundation. I ran the TT course in Kenya for David
                        > pro-bono because of the work we had done together in Nigeria. It was a
                        > personal gift in kind, because David was trying to set up something new
                        > which I wanted to support.
                        >
                        > Hope that clears the confusion.
                        >
                        > If any of the training that I have developed through the TT programme is of
                        > benefit to the Peace Centres I will do my best to share it there as well.
                        >
                        > Pam
                        >
                        > On 09/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Dear Pam and Ricardo,
                        > > Your ideas have been quite edifying .Real Orchards of Thoughts and Ideas
                        > interwoven is a subtle way.And to say that i also keep learning is very
                        > true .
                        > >
                        > > Pam you observed right in a way that the telecentre way is a top down
                        > rather than a bottom up sstrategy. I have been looking at the Telecentre
                        > cookbook cookbook@... and several other resourcs like
                        > http//www.telecentres.org and those that reflect on the African
                        > telecentre Experience.
                        > >
                        > > I have reservations of giving people some tecnology which they might
                        > find irrelevant ,innapropriate or overtaken by times. Pam you have the
                        > experience of Nigeria and even Kenya , where you have engaged in
                        > empoweri ng teachers in ICT skills.I have done the same here. One of the
                        > challanges has always been the infrastructure and i think pooling resources
                        > comes second to none in Africa . The spotlight here is on peace and
                        > sustainable utilisation of ICT infarstructure to promote it. what a better
                        > way of spreading risks by ensuring community ownership through Peace
                        > Centres/Telecentres , Community information Communication technology centres
                        > .. whichever name we have for them!
                        > >
                        > > One thing which did not escape my notice is that the Farmers
                        > cooperative Society which i will visit on tuesday in the clash torn
                        > Eldama Ravine ,jealously kept out of harms way ,the equipmennt they were
                        > given by our partner organisation . This gave me the feelng that they
                        > valued them very much, but hardly appreciated the oppprotunities that
                        > come with ICT.
                        > >
                        > > At the moment am developing an appreciation mannual for the for the
                        > training the management of the faclity and possibly reviewing thier
                        > business plans and mobilise volunteers to with day to day running of
                        > the same ,by incubating some ICT realed business tasks for themselves. I
                        > also plan to take the management of the society for a workshop at Egerton
                        > University's Dairy and Food Technology Deparment to have them be abreast
                        > with Scientific management of enterprises.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Richard your idea especially one page websites ,makinng an income from
                        > computer related tasks , the Minimalist Telecentres is worth trying out
                        > .
                        > > I would prefer raising mones and having contributions directly to CAWD
                        > for such centres. We are yet to register a Trust or Charity.The Work at
                        > hand is a lot which is very good .
                        > >
                        > > Perhaps am torn between implemnting pre-planned projects like these
                        > funded by Microsoft upon invitation, and small beautiful ones that ooze
                        > from Orchards of thought.I tell you this team here is very resilient
                        > ,creative and dymanic, something lacking in NGO's which have a set mind
                        > .
                        > >
                        > > I will be in touch with Mr Mark Matunga of microsoft to engag him on
                        > what role they can play in. He is out of the country at the moment, but
                        > am staying at his house in Nairobi at the moment.
                        > >
                        > > ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Hi Pam and Dan
                        > >
                        > > I just read your messages about establishing peace centres, to
                        > > promote peace and provide work for local youths.
                        > >
                        > > Dan makes a good point about the land and a building for the peace
                        > > centre being the most important things. That implies some money
                        > > needs to be raised to start the centres.
                        > >
                        > > That can be broken down into :-
                        > >
                        > > 1. Outside funding (not very desirable, top-down funding).
                        > >
                        > > 2. Inside/local funding.
                        > >
                        > > I'll quickly mention a few sources of outside funding, then get onto
                        > > the more desirable/sustainable local funding.
                        > >
                        > > Possible outside funding sources:
                        > >
                        > > 1. Donations via CAWD, a registered UK charity - Revive the CAWD
                        > > website, make sure it has at least one wau to accept online
                        > > donations by credit-card, plus a Paypal 'Donate Now' button,
                        > > chequess, etc.
                        > >
                        > > 2. Donations via Dan's charity/non-profit, registered in Kenya.
                        > >
                        > > Either of these could be promoted in the press by
                        > > articles/interviews about the Peace Work. Introducing yourself Pam,
                        > > by talking about the Teachers Talking, could break the ice with
                        > > potential donors and tell people who you are, a kind of potted-
                        > > biography. That would lead into an article about the existing peace
                        > > work, reaching out to different tribal groups to promote peaceful
                        > > dialog, getting people to remove road-blocks, ICT to help the peace
                        > > work, phone airtime transfers, etc. It would lead into 'a call for
                        > > action', asking for donations to establish peace centres. Covering
                        > > several 'angles' may interest more donors. The article could finish
                        > > with a single link to the CAWD website, with a specially
                        > > written 'landing-page', summarising the work and the peace centre
                        > > concept and finish with the 'Donate Now' buttons. There could also
                        > > be a 'sign up for out email newsletter' form, like other charities,
                        > > Water Aid, Sight Savers, etc.
                        > >
                        > > Similar articles/interviews in the Kenyan press could promote Dan's
                        > > organization.
                        > >
                        > > Other outside funding:
                        > >
                        > > Google are possible donors. According to press reports, the
                        > > Google search-engine company have recently set up an office in
                        > > Nairobi, as they are starting to take an interest in Africa at last
                        > > and want to grab market-share ahead of Yahoo and MSN Search.
                        > > Presumably, this is because Kenya and East Africa will get a super-
                        > > fast under-sea fibre optic cable connection to the internet in 2009.
                        > > Construction has already started. This could lead to much lower
                        > > broadband prices, great for starting an East-African 'Tiger Economy'
                        > > like South-East Asia (or should that be 'Lion Economy').
                        > >
                        > > http://allafrica.com/stories/200802051178.html
                        > >
                        > > Microsoft - As Dan knows, Microsoft support computer-literacy
                        > > through sponsorship of CTLCs (Community Technology Learning
                        > > Centres), with low-cost copies of Windows and their office programs,
                        > > etc. You know more about what support they give than I do, Dan.
                        > >
                        > > Individuals - Donations from friends of freinds. Not very
                        > > sustainable, especially if you want to build a large number of
                        > > centres.
                        > >
                        > > Loans - The Grameen Bank of India (NGO), run by a Noble Prize
                        > > winner, promotes micro-businesses, especially for women, through
                        > > small micro-loan clubs. Also, they promote ICT and the Ugandan MTN
                        > > VillagePhone scheme, with a single phone and 25KM phone link to a
                        > > cellphone mast, run jointly between Grameen Bank and the MTN phone
                        > > company. Perhaps Grameen or MTN might grant loans to start Peace
                        > > Centres/TeleCentres.
                        > >
                        > > Local funding:
                        > >
                        > > Offline local fund-raising events -
                        > >
                        > > a) Weekly bring-and-buy sales (like car-boot sales) for local people
                        > > to buy and sell old goods they have, no doubt adding the sale of
                        > > wholesale goods later when some sellers see a good income
                        > > opportunity. A 'pitch-fee' for each table can go to the Peace Centre.
                        > >
                        > > b) Fund-raising sports-events, parties, etc. Either local to where
                        > > the Peace Centre will be built or in richer neighbourhoods of
                        > > Nairobi.
                        > >
                        > > c) If one money-making TeleCentre could be established, some of the
                        > > profits could 'seed' other centres. This is like 'viral marketing',
                        > > so 1 centre seeds 2, then 4, 8, 16, etc.
                        > >
                        > > d) TeleCentres could start as 'Minimalist TeleCentres' (discussed
                        > > some months ago in Mendenyo). You start a centre with the minimum of
                        > > seed capital from any source, buy one money-making asset, such as an
                        > > all-in-one printer/scanner/photocopier for £40 or $80, making money
                        > > just by photocopying for a start, then buy an old computer. This
                        > > provides more income, allowing people to write letters or scan
                        > > photos and documents to floppy disk or CD, to send elsewhere, to
                        > > earn more revenue. Next you add internet-access, by linking the
                        > > computer to a mobile-phone by USB Cable/Bluetooth/Infrared link, and
                        > > connecting to the internet via the phone company's GPRS data-packe
                        > > service, paying by the kilobyte of data, not per minute. This
                        > > provides more income from internet-access, and all sorts of uses for
                        > > the web and email. The income can noe expand the centre from 1
                        > > computer up to 10 or more, a full-size TeleCentre.
                        > >
                        > > The first TeleCentre could start seeding other TeleCentres, even
                        > > before it has grown into a full-size 10-seat centre.
                        > >
                        > > Income activities:
                        > >
                        > > One good task to give local youths would be to get them to create
                        > > one-page websites for promoting local bricks-and-mortar businesses,
                        > > such as shops, manufacturers, wholesalers, service-businesses like
                        > > plumbers and electricians, etc. Armed with a digital camera and a
                        > > notebook, they could get all the contact and product/service details
                        > > from a business owner, then create a one-page website to give that
                        > > business a simple 'presence on the internet'. This means local
                        > > people and people further away can at least find that business and
                        > > place orders by phone or know where they are from a simple map or
                        > > address. The fee for creating the page could be split as income for
                        > > the worker and for the Peace Centre. Its a good 'learning by doing'
                        > > job-skill as well. The worker may use some of the money for more
                        > > online time, for other things.
                        > >
                        > > Anything that stimulates the real offline economy is good. Maybe you
                        > > can think of further examples, or the youths themselves can. They
                        > > could even create the websites for free, just to help the local
                        > > economy, and benefit indirectly. The businesses may offer them on-
                        > > going website maintenance work, for this week's special offers.
                        > >
                        > > Broadcasting by Sneakernet:
                        > >
                        > > One scheme with multiple uses is to set up a 'broadcasting network'
                        > > by CD, flash-drive, or cassette. Using a single PC or Laptop to
                        > > prepare 'radio-programmes', you could 'broadcast' to people with CD
                        > > players, MP3 players, computers at other centres. This could be for
                        > > peace discussion programmers, or raising people's awareness of ICT
                        > > opportunities or ordinary work like brick-laying.
                        > >
                        > > Miscellaneous sales:
                        > >
                        > > If people learn how to produce simple websites, you can boost the
                        > > local economy with free/paid small ads online, and printed as
                        > > posters for those without computer access. In time, it may turn into
                        > > a major auction site like eBay, that don't operate in Africa yet. If
                        > > the sites from all Peace Centres were linked, cross-selling and mail-
                        > > order could boost the economy.
                        > >
                        > > Well that's far too much for one message! What do you think?
                        > >
                        > > Ricardo
                        > >
                        > > --- In learningfromeachother@yahoogroups.com, "Pamela McLean"
                        > > <pam54321@...> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Dear Dan
                        > > >
                        > > > Thank you for your observation that "the post election troubles
                        > > are ... a
                        > > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                        > > felt that
                        > > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                        > > process."
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > There is a need for a genuine reprieve, and perhaps ICT can
                        > > contribute..
                        > > >
                        > > > Regarding ICT I think we are thinking the same in many ways but
                        > > from a
                        > > > slightly different angle, and perhaps with a different image of
                        > > the future
                        > > > benefits of ICT.
                        > > >
                        > > > I think that we are both looking at using ICT for Development, but
                        > > from a
                        > > > different starting point. I do not have any personal direct
                        > > connection with
                        > > > the telecentre movement, but I think that it is a movement that
                        > > has relied
                        > > > on top-down provision of equipment and staffing with a view to
                        > > gradual
                        > > > sustainablity. I think that there is a gresat deal of valuable
                        > > knowledge and
                        > > > experience in the telecentre movement, which it would be good to
                        > > share.
                        > > > However the telecentre model does not seem to me to fit the way
                        > > Minciu Sodas
                        > > > works. "Top down" is not the Minciu Sodas way.
                        > > >
                        > > > Minciu Sodas is a collection of independent thinkers and
                        > > activists - we are
                        > > > not a traditional NGO or funding agency. Mincius Sodas is
                        > > an "Orchard of
                        > > > Thoughts" not a collection of money trees ;-) We value ICT
                        > > because we know
                        > > > that we need to communicate in order to think and exchange ideas
                        > > and
                        > > > information.
                        > > >
                        > > > In Minciu Sodas I feel that the communication and the information
                        > > come
                        > > > first, and the technology follows - I think it is the other way
                        > > round in
                        > > > the telecentre movement. Similarly with the work. In the
                        > > telecentres there
                        > > > is recruitment for paid positions. By contrast people start to
                        > > work within
                        > > > Minciu Sodas because they want to achieve something, not because
                        > > there are
                        > > > paid jobs.
                        > > >
                        > > > I think perhaps we also have different ideas of how ICTs can help
                        > > with
                        > > > development - but I am just guessing here. It is just my
                        > > impression that
                        > > > many people see computers as "something to learn" rather
                        > > than "something to
                        > > > use". I don't want to labour that point, but perhaps I should
                        > > breifly
                        > > > explain what I mean. I know people who have "leart computers"
                        > > I.e. they
                        > > > have learned to operate a computer and they could get a job doing
                        > > word
                        > > > processing or accounts. I know other people who use computes in
                        > > their daily
                        > > > life in a way that is life changing - because they are renewing
                        > > their minds
                        > > > and learning new things, I think it is those who use computers who
                        > > will
                        > > > really be change makers and benefit their local communities - not
                        > > just those
                        > > > who learn computers to get jobs.
                        > > >
                        > > > I am very happy that you have joined us at LFEO and that you bring
                        > > the
                        > > > knowledge and skills of the telecentre movement to share with us.
                        > > Certainly
                        > > > the existing telecentres have a lot to offer the Pyramid of Peace
                        > > and I hope
                        > > > they will all get to know about PoP for closer collaboration.
                        > > >
                        > > > Pam
                        > > >
                        > > > On 07/02/2008, Dan Otedo <dotedo@...> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Pam,
                        > > > > We seem to be thinking about the same thing, and that is very
                        > > good.I also
                        > > > > concur with Tom about the apparent twist in the violence . The
                        > > bringadadge
                        > > > > that we are seeing ,stems from a debilitating anger which is
                        > > due to a
                        > > > > build-up of emotions over time.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > The post election troubles are not a Raila - Kibaki affair. This
                        > > is a
                        > > > > reaction to the injustice done to the Kenyan voter who kindof
                        > > felt that
                        > > > > some reprieve to their situation would come through the electoral
                        > > > > process.believe you me , The people are keenly watching the
                        > > outcome of
                        > > > > the Mediation and should no appropriate solution bases on
                        > > justice and truth
                        > > > > not see the light of day, i fear we will be plunged into the
                        > > Dark
                        > > > > ages. Woe unto Kenya if this ever happens.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Peace Centres/Telecentres or whatever we chose to call th em is
                        > > a noble
                        > > > > idea of going about solving this problem.It is very true like
                        > > in n any
                        > > > > conflict, there is the presenting issue and the emmerging
                        > > issues. The
                        > > > > former in this case is the alleged rigging( the spark) while
                        > > the bigger
                        > > > > one is the myriad of injustices kenyans of different ethno-
                        > > political
                        > > > > persuation have had to live with.(the fuel) This is more of a
                        > > class
                        > > > > struggle.Too bad politics innkenya has been ethnicised.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Am a very strong believer in ICT4D.Major world economies today
                        > > are
                        > > > > Information Technology driven.Here in Africa, Rwanda has already
                        > > become a
                        > > > > ICT hub ( just look at the peace and tranquility they enjoy
                        > > after the
                        > > > > genocide? We cannot undescore the role of ICT in creation of
                        > > new jobs,
                        > > > > new markets ,new revenue and secure livelihoods for millions of
                        > > otherwise
                        > > > > idle Kenyan youths who only look at their- well -to -do
                        > > technosavy
                        > > > > relatives with jealosy. This is the basis of the vision of my
                        > > programme
                        > > > > *Reaching the Unreached.*
                        > > > > **
                        > > > > The peace Centres will go a long way in reaching this critical
                        > > > > mass .My only reservations at the moment is onthe issue of land
                        > > for such
                        > > > > centres. Perhaps it would be good to try identify existing but
                        > > moribund
                        > > > > public structures like Playing fields, cooperative
                        > > societies ,Market places
                        > > > > etc, whie involving the local authorities so that the issue
                        > > of unlimited
                        > > > > acess and ownership is put into perspective.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > How about developing a project strategy that revovles around
                        > > several
                        > > > > activities as some practical steps :
                        > > > >
                        > > > > - Community mobilisation/awareness creation and marketing
                        > > > > - Developing Peace Centre specifications
                        > > > > - Sourcing and installing hardware equipment and software
                        > > > > - Recruitment of staff
                        > > > > - Development of local content taking into cognisance the
                        > > social
                        > > > > economic enviroment
                        > > > > - Business incubation ( a kind of informal sector business
                        > > > > institute )
                        > > > > - Strategies for sustainability
                        > > > > - Monitoring and evaluation of the Peace Centres
                        > > > >
                        > > > > The peace centres would be more of community resource
                        > > centres,
                        > > > > complete with several other activities for entertainment to
                        > > help in
                        > > > > bonding the youth towards progressive activities.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Now the challange is how to get our act together while
                        > > appreciating
                        > > > > the different strengths each of us have ,develop some worklplan
                        > > and have
                        > > > > Those with a passion for this to coalesce around it .
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > *Pamela McLean <pam54321@...>* wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Tom and everyone.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > As Tom explains, in Kenya the post-election turmoil has given the
                        > > > > opportunity and excuse for looting, but poverty is the
                        > > cause.Somehow we
                        > > > > have to create work for people - and not just in Kenya. I
                        > > understand that
                        > > > > the anger and hopelssness of unenemployed youth also drives much
                        > > of the
                        > > > > robbery and violence in Nigeria. (It is probably something
                        > > similar with the
                        > > > > killings we have here, and in many countries. It is very
                        > > terrible.)
                        > > > >
                        > > > > How can we help to promote sustainable economic growth - a new
                        > > model for
                        > > > > the future sustainability (and stablilty) of the world.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > My knowledge of history is not good, but I have a vague feeling
                        > > that in
                        > > > > the great depression of the 1930's, there was a programme of
                        > > public work in
                        > > > > the USA (called the Marshall plan?) which put people to work on
                        > > projects of
                        > > > > value to the community as a whole - thus kick starting the
                        > > economy. Could
                        > > > > PoP initiate something similar?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > There has been much damage so there will need to be rebuilding.
                        > > What if
                        > > > > PoP was able to help with rebuilding in some way? What if PoP
                        > > started by
                        > > > > building local Peace Centres. People could start now, finding
                        > > appropriate
                        > > > > sites and starting to prepare the ground. Somehow we must find
                        > > money to feed
                        > > > > the workers, even if at first they could not be paid a wage.
                        > > Work also uses
                        > > > > energy and time that can otherwise go on violence - and
                        > > productive work
                        > > > > gives purpose and is a source of pride. Good workers would be
                        > > first in line
                        > > > > as paid jobs begin to come through - but the opportunities need
                        > > to be spread
                        > > > > as widely s possible for community benefit - not individual
                        > > gain - local
                        > > > > peopel will know how it should be done.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > I have often seen ideas within Minciu Sodas and elsewhere on the
                        > > internet
                        > > > > for sustainable local solutions to problems. I suggest that to
                        > > begin with we
                        > > > > only use well tried examples of good practice (such as water
                        > > harvesting,
                        > > > > already familiar in Kenya). People will not be in the right
                        > > mood for
                        > > > > experiments that may not work. Experimentation can come later.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Initially the Peace Centres could help to provide temporary
                        > > shelter or
                        > > > > other facilities for displaced people if necessary. They would
                        > > of course
                        > > > > have good communication links from the start - thanks to PoP
                        > > phones
                        > > > > initially; then sneakernet, Includers etc; and, later on, full
                        > > connectivity.
                        > > > > The centres could gradually become centres of education and
                        > > training, as
                        > > > > well as sports and arts and general community centres - power
                        > > houses of
                        > > > > innovation, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, vocational
                        > > skiil
                        > > > > building, health education, enterprise development incorporating
                        > > micro
                        > > > > finance and other enabling services etc. They could also become
                        > > experimental
                        > > > > centres for sustainable technology - biogas etc. This would all
                        > > be done
                        > > > > through local small steps but with big vision - e.g. sports
                        > > starts with a
                        > > > > couple of footballs - but with a vision for tournaments and so
                        > > on.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > My feeling is that preference should always be given to local
                        > > labour and
                        > > > > local materials - even if that involves more skill building,
                        > > slower results
                        > > > > and an approach that is initially low tech. However there
                        > > should be an
                        > > > > emphasis on quality and pride in results. Anything that is not
                        > > sustainable
                        > > > > should be seen as a temporary solution with plans to replace it.
                        > > Gradually
                        > > > > the centres should become models of excellence of local - really
                        > > local -
                        > > > > developments - locally individual solutions to local needs - but
                        > > with a
                        > > > > shared vision and 'feel' to them. They would share openly good
                        > > ides that
                        > > > > work - and share problems and difficulties so that everyone can
                        > > learn from
                        > > > > them.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Perhaps the builders would help with rebuilding houses etc once
                        > > the centre
                        > > > > was constructed. Maybe new housing could be influenced by
                        > > sustainable
                        > > > > housing ideas coming from the Peace Centres.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Building the local economy would be on a Small is Beautiful
                        > > approach - not
                        > > > > some top down model.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Does this idea have any merit? If so how could it be developed
                        > > into
                        > > > > something workable? What practical first steps could we take?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Maybe we could share ideas on buiding Peace Centres at this
                        > > afternoons
                        > > > > chat, as well as collecting PoP stories.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Pam
                        > > > >
                        > > > > 07/02/2008, tom ochuka <tomochuka@...> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Dear All,
                        > > > > > Wellwe dont ned toproject what doesnot fir us..Ihave
                        > > > > > rerad sukuma for sure i have not had any other killing
                        > > > > > on ..different comunities here even..what ishapenning
                        > > > > > in Naivashais not here..No Luo has gone to ..kill
                        > > > > > another comunity..What has been here is looting.
                        > > > > > This time because of poverty..theft islikely tobe high
                        > > > > > with noplacesof employment.
                        > > > > > weare working it out with ken..odhisand Ron on
                        > > > > > acentre.
                        > > > > > Iplan tomet ken..whohadbeen away..weare affiliating
                        > > > > > with joytang about this.
                        > > > > > Theres aswecomunicated wehadgoodheavydownpor
                        > > > > > alliscalm..now day 6.
                        > > > > > Wehope the situation willjust be thismuch..many
                        > > > > > scholsare on.
                        > > > > > Thanksto police for being alert apickpocket died under
                        > > > > > mobjustice killing..thisbroght acomotiontomany..it
                        > > > > > wasanother violence.
                        > > > > > We donot really want tosomuch givesobad image to
                        > > > > > 100yrsoldcity.
                        > > > > > I LIVE 5MINSDRIVE FROMTHE CITY..Ihave been personally
                        > > > > > avictimof looting ..whilegand.invaded my house.
                        > > > > > Thisismuchidleness..lets creat jobsfor thisyoug
                        > > > > > people..and they willstopit...they just..got
                        > > > > > opportunity hiding under election but..they really
                        > > > > > aare jobless.
                        > > > > > Thanks
                        > > > > > TOM.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Dan Andrew Otedo
                        > > > > Administrator
                        > > > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                        > > > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                        > > > > Kenya
                        > > > > +254720366094
                        > > > >
                        > >
                        > > Dan Andrew Otedo
                        > > Administrator
                        > > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                        > > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                        > > Kenya
                        > > +254720366094
                        >
                        > Dan Andrew Otedo
                        > Administrator
                        > Tom Mboya Community Technology Learning Center
                        > P.O.box 18 Mbita Code 40305
                        > Kenya
                        > +254720366094
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