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Re: Central working space, video editing and connectivity

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  • David mutua
    Dear Ken and Ricardo, Ken, that you are near to my place and Rachel s office a walking distance from where the bus drops, we can explore the idea of using my
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 5, 2008
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      Dear Ken and Ricardo,
      Ken, that you are near to my place and Rachel's office a walking distance from where the bus drops, we can explore the idea of using my living room as office as i do that and my laptop to edit the videos we have been able to collect during the visits, i am using a Mac system that comes with a video editing tool/application, i was using the same system in Nigeria for video editing in developing Open and Distance Learning videos that we translated in different languages,  though i am not a professional but i believe with support from our network we can  explore the possibility of developing evidence of our work  together.
      We can do this from my house as a central office though i am not connected to internet and you are not too, can we together explore such possibilities, we can follow Ricardo's advice and make it a central reporting area.

      Regards,

      David



      ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@...> wrote:
      Hi Ken and David
      if you can have a central office with internet-
      access, that would be great. If you want, I can help in any way I
      can, with technical advice, etc, by text or email.

      You may not want to get into the technical detail straight away, but
      here are some things you can read...

      My Worknets 'InternetAccessByMo bilePhone' page, has most of the
      details of using laptop/PC + Bluetooth/Infrared/ USB Phone. It still
      needs a few little details of GPRS settings etc for Kenya and
      Safaricom.

      http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?InternetAcce ssByMobilePhone

      You said your phone is a Nokia 6070. I looked at the manual online
      to see what it can do (a downloadable .PDF file).

      http://www.nokia. co.uk/A4222162

      The manual says that it has an Infrared interface. As you know, this
      lets you connect to a laptop with built-in Infrared interface by
      line-of-site Infrared light beam. People find this a little harder
      to use than a Bluetooth radio connection, but it should work if the
      Infrared interface on your phone points straight at the Infrared
      port on your laptop (on the side usually).

      If you use a desktop PC, you can add a USB Infrared (IrDA Infrared
      Data Association) adapter, which looks like a memory stick,
      sometimes called a 'dongle'. You may be able to buy one in a
      computer shop in Nairobi. Alternatively, I sent one to Samwel, in
      the parcel of books. Talk to Sam or Dan Otedo. Perhaps they can post
      it to you, and a spare Bluetooth adapter for other people's
      Bluetooth phones.

      There are then several stages, to get internet access...

      1. Get the Infrared link working from the laptop to/from the phone.
      You can test this by transferring files, such as MP3 music or some
      text files to/from the phone's internal memory. Your phone manual
      explains how to do this. If you need help, there are articles on the
      internet or you can email me or talk to friends who have done it.

      2. The next step is to get GPRS internet access working on your
      phone, using the Safaricom GPRS service. You can either go to a
      Safaricom shop or call customer services on 123. They may give you
      some settings to type in during the set-up process or just send you
      an SMS, with a link that you click to store all the settings in your
      phone automatically.

      3. Your phone may have a built-in browser program. This will allow
      you to test GPRS internet-access, just using your phone, not a
      laptop+phone yet.

      4. If the built-in browser isn't very good and doesn't display pages
      properly, you can download the free Opera Mini browser to your
      phone. It's very good.

      http://www.opera. com/products/

      It's a good idea to program your home-page and favourite pages into
      the phone, to save entering long web-addresses. I use the search
      engine http://www.google. co.uk/ as my home page. I have Yahoo Groups
      as a bookmarked page.

      5. GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) is fairly fast, but your
      Nokia 6070 phone can also use GPRS/EDGE, the faster Enhanced Data
      Rate GPRS. See Wikipedia GPRS articles and the 'How stuff works'
      website for explanations. ..

      http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ General_Packet_ Radio_Service

      6. With normal phone calls, you pay by the minute, because your
      phone has exclusive use of one phone channel to the phone-mast. With
      GPRS, many people's phones share many channels, just sending and
      receiving data packets. You pay by the kilobyte, for the data you
      transfer, such as web-pages, emails and files. Large files like
      videos may cost a lot to transfer. If so, then you could burn it to
      a CD or DVD using a laptop or PCs built-in or external USB CD/DVD
      writer. You can then get someone to take the disk to a friend in the
      local area, such as Nairobi, who has an unlimited usage internet
      subscription, to upload to YouTube. Alternatively, you could mail it
      to a friend further away, even to Europe, so they can upload it.
      This is a single-link Sneakernet. See these pages that I wrote...

      http://wiki. laptop.org/ go/Sneakernet

      http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Sneakernet

      If you do decide to operate a 'Sneakernet' on CD or flash-drive, it
      would be good to have a regular weekly service to/from a friend with
      fast internet access or to Europe. A CD is 700MB and a DVD is 4.7GB,
      so there is room for thousands of files. This means that when you
      send CDs/DVDs just for videos, you can also operate a
      complete 'mail' service for anyone in your area from our network of
      friends to upload/download files to the internet, send/recieve
      emails as text files to their friends and colleagues, etc, without
      the cost of internet-cafes. They can use the service for files,
      photos, computer-programs and emails where a few days delay don't
      matter, then just use expensive internet-cafes for fast interactive
      web-browsing.

      My Sneakernet articles describe extending it into a complete
      network, passing files or physical disks/flash- drives from village-
      to-village-to- village to reach a place with internet access. This
      means a whole area can have cheap indirect, delayed internet access
      for email, photos, etc. Its not perfect, but its much, much better
      than no electronic communication at all. You can ask friends by
      email-text-file to send you something, such as copies of Yahoo Group
      messages, emails, web-pages, freeware software, photos or videos,
      government forms, shop price-lists, etc. This would be good for
      schools, health projects, peace projects, etc, even for an 'offline
      cyber-cafe business' where an isolated village only has Sneakernet
      access to the rest of the world.

      7. Internet-access using Laptop+Phone

      I have never set this up using Infrared, but I have got it working
      with a Desktop PC, Bluetooth Adapter/Dongle + Nokia N73 Bluetooth
      Phone. It can do Infrared and I have an Infrared dongle, so I may be
      able to try it myself, then send you further instructions if you
      need them.

      There are articles on the internet about how to do this, and some
      info in your phone manual. You need to set up a 'Dial Up Networking'
      connection.

      See the info about setting up Dial Up Networking on this page and
      talk to Fred Kayiwa as well (he's using Bluetooth Dial-Up
      Networking). ..

      http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?InternetAcce ssByMobilePhone

      8. When you look at articles on the internet about accessing the
      internet using Laptop+Infrared Phone, note that some articles will
      be talking about ordinary WAP (Wireless Access Protocol) internet
      access, where you pay by the minute. Some articles will be talking
      about GPRS, where you pay by the kilobyte.

      This google search for 'infrared laptop phone internet access'
      should give you lots of articles...

      http://www.google. co.uk/search?
      hl=en&q=infrared+ laptop+phone+ internet+ access&meta=

      Well that's a lot of things to look at. Let me know what information
      you really need to get GPRS set up.

      As you mentioned, there are plenty of business opportunities in
      these ideas, for the longer term, for your own income, or to raise
      money for projects.

      You can see a list of all the ideas I want to test sometime at...

      http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?Ricardo

      This page may have a little more info for using phones, and building
      a 'laptop' system around them, with peripherals. ..

      http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?BluetoothPho neIncluder

      Ricardo

      --- In mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com, Kennedy Owino <nafsiafricaacro@ ...>
      wrote:
      >
      > David,
      >
      > You have a profound thinking, this is a moment that we have to
      be more focussed towards centralising our activities and efforts in
      Kenya.
      > As much as we are independent thinkers linked up by a network,
      organisational structures are necessary.
      > As much as we have autonomous efforts towards one goal, we need
      one entity that would define what we are doing all together here in
      Kenya.
      > Regular meetings, set goals, objectives will bring us together
      in oneness that will add up the other faces of our Kenyan
      slogan "Peace, Love and Unity"
      >
      > David, i have loads of videos that i would like to edit and
      upload on u-tube, but i have to go to the cyber to do this.
      > If we had an office with ICT facilities, our work would be
      easened and expenses saved.
      > I don't mind working from your place, does your laptop have
      video editing programmes?
      > I wanted to gather all the pics and video images and stories
      captured from all the activities we have had (Naivasha trip, Koffi
      Anan Meeting, or any other materials that you or Rachael may have).
      > These need to be compiled into one or broken presentations for
      documentation, archiving or use in raising funds.
      > Perhaps you can help me in this, i want to avoid instances where
      i have to send videos over the country for editing, yet we can do it
      from here.
      > We have skills and what you are providing here David, is
      capacity to do things.
      > I have already edited our "Amani Circus Event " video and
      waiting to upload it into u-tube, I will provide the links later.
      > It cost me Ksh 8,000, most of the amount met by friends.
      > So this gives me another business opportunity lying in waiting
      here.
      >
      > For internet connectivity, i have very limited resource of
      knowledge to share with you;
      > One way, to have a connection, you will have to buy a line from
      any ISP company as Telecom or Jambonet
      > Swift global offer fast ADSL service but expensive,Sasa Net also
      offer ADSL which is a wire less service.
      > The other option is LAN offered by Telecom.
      >
      > You can also buy a onepot modem from Telecom which is mostly for
      home use, it cost Ksh 8,000 subscription fee and the rates depend on
      wether you choose a limited or unlimited service.
      > Safaricom also has a similar service that they launched recently.
      > Anyway confirm with this companies for more comprehensive info.
      >
      > The third option, is as explained by Ricardo, If your phone has
      internet options, you can go to Safaricom offices to configure your
      phone settings and they will give you an account to enable it.
      > If your phone has a GPRS access point then you can easily access
      the internet , and you will be charged based on the capacity of the
      any webpage you open.
      > Their charges are very negligible, and most people use their
      phones to check mails and respond to mails.
      > Ask Rachael, she will be able to give you more details.
      > Unfortunately mine has never been able to open up any Yahoo page
      and this is also a true case to many.
      > But most people have been able to easily access G-mail and also
      some websites.
      > I have a Nokia 6070,
      > You can then connect your phone to your laptop (i haven't been
      able to do this, i tried using a friend's laptop but didn't manage)
      using blue tooth, USB cable or infrared.
      > Fred as been able to do this, please go through Ricardos
      explanation below.
      >
      > If you succeed in this, then our idea of creating a negotiation
      forum between the battling tribes using teleconfrencing will come in
      well.
      > Thanks for opening up your space to us, it's rare to find people
      willing to share their living quaters with others.
      > You are a rare gift David,
      >
      > Peace,
      >
      > Ken Owino
      > Nafsi Afrika Acrobats
      > www.nafsiafrica. org
      > +254723568251
      > P.S; note by the change in our domain name.
      >
      > More technical stuff
      > ------------ --------- --------- --------- ---
      > You mentioned that you want to write articles when out in the
      field. The laptop will be good for that, but here's another option
      you could use from time to time, if its more convenient than
      carrying a laptop. Other people might use it too :-
      >
      > You said your phone has Bluetooth and Infrared interfaces. This
      means...
      >
      > 1. If you can get hold of a Bluetooth or Infrared QWERTY
      keyboard (perhaps a 'fold-in-half' keyboard), you could use that to
      type text quickly into a word-processor program on the phone, or a
      text-editor or email/SMS editor. It's much faster than the keypad.
      >
      > 2. If you buy a USB Bluetooth adaptor, you can connect by short-
      range radio link (up to 10 metres) to your desktop PC or laptop, to
      transfer your articles to the PC when you get home. You can do this
      via an Infrared adaptor or your phone's Sony Ericsson USB cable too.
      I find Bluetooth a lot easier to use than USB cable. You can
      transfer any type of file to/from the phone for editing text,
      viewing photos, listning to MP3 music. You can treat the phone like
      a USB Flash Drive, a removeable storage device, where you drag-and-
      drop files to and from it to/from the PC (or laptop).
      >
      > 3. The new laptop will have Infrared built in. You can link to
      your phone to transfer files or to link the laptop to the internet
      via the phone's GPRS modem. The phone infrared interface needs to be
      in line-of-site and point at the laptop infrared interface. It may
      be on the left or right side of the laptop.
      >
      > 4. If the laptop keyboard is a bit small or hard to use, then if
      you decide to buy a full-size QWERTY keyboard to use with the phone,
      then it could be used with the laptop via the built-in infrared
      interface or a plug-in USB Bleutooth adapter/dongle.
      >
      > For your phone, there are plenty of free programs on the
      internet for word-processing, spreadsheets, photo-viewing/ editing,
      video-playing, instant messaging, accessing yahoo groups, etc. You
      can do a lot of the things you do on a laptop if you find the right
      free software. The programs can be downloaded via the phone network,
      or via the internet to a PC, then loaded to the phone via USB,
      Bluetooth or Infrared. It helps to carry a Bluetooth adaptor around
      all the time, to access any PC (with some adapters, you need to
      carry the Bluetooth software one-time installation CD, others use
      Windows XP drivers). I don't know whether cyber-cafe owners let you
      download files from the internet, then transfer them to your phone
      via a Bluetooth adapter, or do similar uploads. They may worry about
      viruses.
      >
      > There's also USB flash-drive file transfer from cyber-cafe PC to
      your laptop, then by Bluetooth/Infrared/ USB Cable to your phone.
      >
      > Samwel has some spare Bluetooth adapters. I sent him 10 adapters
      in a parcel of books recently, and he should have about 3 spare. You
      can talk to Sam's friend Dan Otedo about that (dotedo@..., +254 720
      366 094 ). The parcel may still be at the Mbita post-office.
      >
      > All this info, some of which you may know already, is just to
      give you plenty of options for building complete systems around a
      phone, laptop or desktop PC. If it's of no use at the moment, then
      you may want to save it for later, or for other people to use.
      >
      > All the best.
      >
      > Ricardo
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I have also thought
      >
      > David mutua <davenzainga@ ...> wrote:
      > Dear Ricardo,Sam, Ken, Pam and All,
      > I am interested to know how this works,i have tried to have
      internet connection in my living room, that, have converted it to be
      an office to most of the project work that i do,Pam,Sam and Ken have
      been in my house and had a meeting there, i won't mind if i
      volunteer for our network to use the space when in Nairobi for a
      centralised area of work and can offer accommodation for our group
      members when in Nairobi, meetings for our activities can be held
      there with enabled means of communication (such like
      teleconferencing) .
      > My experience is been setting up Community Learning Centres or
      resource centres or telecenters, this started in Nigeria,i have been
      involved in developing the African telecentre community, my interest
      is how ICT's can enable quality education and development in rural
      information and financial poor communities in developing world, what
      is the best technology that fits in with the local situations in the
      developing world? Have had the opportunity to research and involved
      in the technology projects aimed at addressing the connectivity
      issues in the developing world,tools that are believed to address
      those issues of hardware and software problems faced by the
      developing nations.
      >
      > Can we explore this ideas together?
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > David N. Mutua
      > CAWD - Kenya/ Returned VSO Volunteer,
      > ICT4D and Education Consultant.
      > Tel: +254 720 462 559
      > E-mail: david@... or davenzainga@ ...
      > www.worknets. org/wiki. cgi?DavidMutua
      > http://cawdkenya. blogspot. com/
      >
      > ----- Original Message ----
      > From: ricardoolpc <ricardoolpc@ ...>
      > To: mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com
      > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2008 2:09:30 PM
      > Subject: [mendenyo] Re: sam is ok
      >
      > Hi Fred
      > I heard from Sam 2 days ago (Saturday 02-Feb-2008) and he is
      > feeling okay. He needs to go to Nairobi sometime for some more
      > tests, but he is waiting for the chaos in Kenya to die down.
      >
      > Did you get the Bluetooth working yet, from laptop to bluetooth
      > phone? I hope you got my email or text to say that I've got a
      > similar setup working here. I've got my Desktop PC configured to
      use
      > a Bluetooth Dial-Up Networking connection via my Nokia N73
      Bluetooth
      > phone. The key detail I found on the internet was to use phone
      > number *99#. Some articles said to use a blank phone number. It
      now
      > works fine and I can access any web-page, google, yahoo email, etc.
      >
      > I think you said you were going to contact your phone company MTN
      > Uganda to try to set it up. Have you had time to do that?
      >
      > If you could get that working, so that you know all the details,
      > that would be great. As soon as it's working, I wondered whether
      you
      > could talk to Ken Owino about it, in case Ken or anyone he knows
      > wants to get GPRS phones or a Laptop + GPRS Phone in Kenya, for
      his
      > peace work. He is going to get a laptop soon. Do you both speak
      > Kiswahili?
      >
      > There is some info on this page, but a few missing details...
      >
      > http://www.worknets .org/wiki. cgi?InternetAcce ssByMobilePhone
      >
      > Ricardo
      >
      > --- In mendenyo@yahoogroup s.com, kayiwa fred <fdkayiwa@ .> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > I cant wait to thank all of you who have done alot to
      > > Samuel
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
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