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can lean development be applied to education industry

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  • yadav_jyo_1986
    hello Lean development is a concept already applied to automobile,spinning & weaving and software industry.Does anyone think it can be applied to education
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 10, 2011
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      hello
      Lean development is a concept already applied to automobile,spinning & weaving and software industry.Does anyone think it can be applied to education industry?If yes,how do you think it can be done.
    • garthtut
      ... I toured a grade school in Seattle (University Child Development School) that I believe falls into this category. There were obvious things that are done
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 11, 2011
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        --- In leanprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "yadav_jyo_1986" <yadav_jyo_1986@...> wrote:
        >
        > hello
        > Lean development is a concept already applied to automobile,spinning & weaving and software industry.Does anyone think it can be applied to education industry?If yes,how do you think it can be done.
        >

        I toured a grade school in Seattle (University Child Development School) that I believe falls into this category.

        There were obvious things that are done in many schools (student to teacher ratio is low - limiting WIP; Students are thoroughly vetted prior to admission - High quality raw material) but, not as common is the tailoring of curriculum to the individual students (design), cross domain projects (e.g. science project overlapping with music class project), high degree of partnering with parents (customer collaboration and establishing a relation with your supply chain), and one of the coolest things IMHO is that the teachers gathered nearly every day after school in a sort of kaizen event to discuss how to keep the kids challenged, to sort out problems and to share success stories.

        Also, the students are given a lot of say in their own curriculum and are empowered to solve problems (and not just personal or classroom problems, but school wide problems as well.) I believe I even remember being told that at any point during class any student can call a meeting to bring up an issue and work to resolve it (Jidoka).

        I was pretty impressed and I brought up the analogies to the staff, but they were unfamiliar with Lean/Deming/Agile/etc...

        I hope that helped.
        Garth
      • vic_williams_facilitator
        Hi, There s a side shift for some in this in that, as Johnson below points out, lean merges into natural patterns. Not industry. A good learning place is a
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 12, 2011
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          Hi,

          There's a side shift for some in this in that, as Johnson below points out, lean merges into natural patterns. Not industry. A good learning place is a Japanese tea ceremony with no teacher.

          He teaches per lean principles "H. Thomas Johnson". A google on him gives some publications. Naturally, he's widely ignored in industrial society.

          (here's a more industrial approach)
          Improving business school courses by applying lean princples and practices - M.L. Emiliani (free downloadable pdf)

          Abstract
          Describes the application of lean principles and practices to the
          design and delivery of a graduate business course on leadership
          taken by part-time working professional students in a classroom
          setting. The principal objectives were to improve consistency
          between what was taught in the course and how the course was
          taught, eliminate waste, improve the quality and relevance of
          course materials, and deliver greater value as perceived by
          students. Results indicate a higher level of student satisfaction,
          in part through clearer expectations, less ambiguity regarding
          lectures and assignments, standard formats for assignments,
          smoothing individual and team assignments over the semester,
          and better management of students' time both in and outside
          class. This joins a growing body of work that demonstrates the
          applicability of lean principles and practices to service
          businesses, and the achievement of improved outcomes.


          --- In leanprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "yadav_jyo_1986" <yadav_jyo_1986@...> wrote:
          >
          > hello
          > Lean development is a concept already applied to automobile,spinning & weaving and software industry.Does anyone think it can be applied to education industry?If yes,how do you think it can be done.
          >
        • yadav_jyo_1986
          That was indeed helpful Garth.Thank you.Keep sharing such experiences. Jyoti
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 14, 2011
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            That was indeed helpful Garth.Thank you.Keep sharing such experiences.


            Jyoti
            --- In leanprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "garthtut" <garthtutor@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > --- In leanprogramming@yahoogroups.com, "yadav_jyo_1986" <yadav_jyo_1986@> wrote:
            > >
            > > hello
            > > Lean development is a concept already applied to automobile,spinning & weaving and software industry.Does anyone think it can be applied to education industry?If yes,how do you think it can be done.
            > >
            >
            > I toured a grade school in Seattle (University Child Development School) that I believe falls into this category.
            >
            > There were obvious things that are done in many schools (student to teacher ratio is low - limiting WIP; Students are thoroughly vetted prior to admission - High quality raw material) but, not as common is the tailoring of curriculum to the individual students (design), cross domain projects (e.g. science project overlapping with music class project), high degree of partnering with parents (customer collaboration and establishing a relation with your supply chain), and one of the coolest things IMHO is that the teachers gathered nearly every day after school in a sort of kaizen event to discuss how to keep the kids challenged, to sort out problems and to share success stories.
            >
            > Also, the students are given a lot of say in their own curriculum and are empowered to solve problems (and not just personal or classroom problems, but school wide problems as well.) I believe I even remember being told that at any point during class any student can call a meeting to bring up an issue and work to resolve it (Jidoka).
            >
            > I was pretty impressed and I brought up the analogies to the staff, but they were unfamiliar with Lean/Deming/Agile/etc...
            >
            > I hope that helped.
            > Garth
            >
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