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Lean Study Tour, Day 0 - Sunday

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  • Mary Poppendieck
    Sunday is arrival day for the Lean Study tour, but Henrik Kniberg got here earlier with his family. His blog about Lean at Tokyo Disney Resort is at
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 19 1:54 PM
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      Sunday is arrival day for the Lean Study tour, but Henrik Kniberg got here earlier with his family.  His blog about Lean at Tokyo Disney Resort is at http://blog.crisp.se/henrikkniberg/2009/04/14/1239725880000.html

       

      As we returned to our hotel from the restaurant about 10:30 in the evening, we passed a small construction area.  I have heard that construction areas are small in Japan, and here was a case in point.  The construction area consumed the curb lane of one-half of a short block.  There were two small dump trucks side-by-side – one with dirt and the other perhaps some other construction material.  The one with dirt was being backed up to fill a deep hole about 2m by 6m.  Except for that hole, there was no other construction and no debris.  There were perhaps a half dozen people at the site, all obviously busy, working with a bank of floodlights which brightly lit the small area being worked on.  If this was like other construction sites I’ve heard of, work will be finished and the barriers cleared by morning.  Economies of scale (tear up a few KM at once) are not used. Instead, economies of flow (don’t disrupt traffic during the day – do one small batch of work every night) predominate. And I have no doubt that a small batch every night is not only more convenient for the road users, I’ll guess that it’s a lot cheaper too.

       

      Mary Poppendieck

      952-934-7998

      www.poppendieck.com

      Author of: Lean Software Development & Implementing Lean Software Development

       

    • Mike Dwyer
      Mary What you describe is exactly what my neighbor does as a foreman for a construction company in the Boston Metro area. They concentrate on urban
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 20 4:12 AM
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        Mary
        What you describe is exactly what my neighbor does as a foreman for a construction company in the Boston Metro area.
        They concentrate on urban infrastructure repair and work from 9pm to 6am. The only variance to this is to comply with some towns noise and excessive light laws which do not allow loud noises or disruptive lights at night. Apparently these communities want to be rested when they face driving to work through construction zones. Can I assume that this type of local legislative capability is not a contingency?

        Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T


        From: "Mary Poppendieck"
        Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 05:54:26 +0900
        To: <leandevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [leandevelopment] Lean Study Tour, Day 0 - Sunday

        Sunday is arrival day for the Lean Study tour, but Henrik Kniberg got here earlier with his family.  His blog about Lean at Tokyo Disney Resort is at http://blog. crisp.se/ henrikkniberg/ 2009/04/14/ 1239725880000. html

         

        As we returned to our hotel from the restaurant about 10:30 in the evening, we passed a small construction area.  I have heard that construction areas are small in Japan, and here was a case in point.  The construction area consumed the curb lane of one-half of a short block.  There were two small dump trucks side-by-side – one with dirt and the other perhaps some other construction material.  The one with dirt was being backed up to fill a deep hole about 2m by 6m.  Except for that hole, there was no other construction and no debris.  There were perhaps a half dozen people at the site, all obviously busy, working with a bank of floodlights which brightly lit the small area being worked on.  If this was like other construction sites I’ve heard of, work will be finished and the barriers cleared by morning.  Economies of scale (tear up a few KM at once) are not used. Instead, economies of flow (don’t disrupt traffic during the day – do one small batch of work every night) predominate. And I have no doubt that a small batch every night is not only more convenient for the road users, I’ll guess that it’s a lot cheaper too.

         

        Mary Poppendieck

        952-934-7998

        www.poppendieck. com

        Author of: Lean Software Development & Implementing Lean Software Development

         

      • Mary Poppendieck
        Well the point here is not the HAVE construction zones during the day. Mary Poppendieck 952-934-7998 www.poppendieck.com Author of: Lean Software Development &
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 21 2:37 PM
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          Well the point here is not the HAVE construction zones during the day. 

           

          Mary Poppendieck

          952-934-7998

          www.poppendieck.com

          Author of: Lean Software Development & Implementing Lean Software Development

           

          From: leandevelopment@yahoogroups.com [mailto:leandevelopment@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mike Dwyer
          Sent: Monday, April 20, 2009 08:12 PM
          To: leandevelopment@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [leandevelopment] Lean Study Tour, Day 0 - Sunday

           




          Mary
          What you describe is exactly what my neighbor does as a foreman for a construction company in the Boston Metro area.
          They concentrate on urban infrastructure repair and work from 9pm to 6am. The only variance to this is to comply with some towns noise and excessive light laws which do not allow loud noises or disruptive lights at night. Apparently these communities want to be rested when they face driving to work through construction zones. Can I assume that this type of local legislative capability is not a contingency?

          Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T


          From: "Mary Poppendieck"
          Date: Mon, 20 Apr 2009 05:54:26 +0900
          To: <leandevelopment@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [leandevelopment] Lean Study Tour, Day 0 - Sunday

          Sunday is arrival day for the Lean Study tour, but Henrik Kniberg got here earlier with his family.  His blog about Lean at Tokyo Disney Resort is at http://blog.crisp.se/henrikkniberg/2009/04/14/1239725880000.html

           

          As we returned to our hotel from the restaurant about 10:30 in the evening, we passed a small construction area.  I have heard that construction areas are small in Japan, and here was a case in point.  The construction area consumed the curb lane of one-half of a short block.  There were two small dump trucks side-by-side – one with dirt and the other perhaps some other construction material.  The one with dirt was being backed up to fill a deep hole about 2m by 6m.  Except for that hole, there was no other construction and no debris .  There were perhaps a half dozen people at the site, all obviously busy, working with a bank of floodlights which brightly lit the small area being worked on.  If this was like other construction sites I’ve heard of, work will be finished and the barriers cleared by morning.  Economies of scale (tear up a few KM at once) are not used. Instead, economies of flow (don’t disrupt traffic during the day – do one small batch of work every night) predominate. And I have no doubt that a small batch every night is not only more convenient for the road users, I’ll guess that it’s a lot cheaper too.

           

          Mary Poppendieck

          952-934-7998

          www.poppendieck.com

          Author of: Lean Software Development & Implementing Lean Software Development

           

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